William and Jane Phinney House

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William and Jane Phinney House
William and Jane Phinney House, 1730.jpg
William and Jane Phinney House in 2014
William and Jane Phinney House is located in Cape Cod
William and Jane Phinney House
William and Jane Phinney House is located in Massachusetts
William and Jane Phinney House
William and Jane Phinney House is located in the US
William and Jane Phinney House
Location 555 Phinney's Lane, Barnstable, Massachusetts
Coordinates 41°39′47″N 70°19′42″W / 41.66306°N 70.32833°W / 41.66306; -70.32833Coordinates: 41°39′47″N 70°19′42″W / 41.66306°N 70.32833°W / 41.66306; -70.32833
Built 1730 (1730)
Architect Phinney,William
MPS Barnstable MRA
NRHP Reference #

87000284

[1]
Added to NRHP March 13, 1987

The William and Jane Phinney House is a historic house at 555 Phinney's Lane in the Centerville area of Barnstable, Massachusetts. Built c. 1730, it is the oldest surviving house in the village, and has an early surviving example of a bowed roof, a distinctive regional variation on the Cape style house. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1987.[1]

Description and history[edit]

The William and Jane Phinney House stands in the northern part of the village of Centerville, on the north side of Phinney's Lane at its junction with Richard's Lane. It is a 1-1/2 story wood frame structure, with a bowed gable roof, central chimney, and clapboarded exterior. It has a symmetrical five-bay facade, with a center entrance that has a four-light transom window above. Structural timbers are exposed in its interior, which also retains other original 18th-century features. The only major alterations have been the addition of electricity and plumbing.[2]

By local tradition, the oldest portion of this building is a "half Cape" (three bays wide) built about 1730. It was probably built by William Phinney, its first owner,[2] in a part of Centerville that was one of the earliest areas to be settled by European colonists. It is significant as an early example of a bowed roof, a notable regional variant often associated with carpenters experienced in the shipbuilding trade.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b "MACRIS inventory record for William Phinney House". Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved 2014-05-04. 
  3. ^ "Barnstable Multiple Resource Area Document". Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved 2016-10-31.