Willie Morris (diplomat)

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Willie Morris
British Ambassador to Egypt
In office
1968–1972
Preceded by Horace Phillip
Succeeded by Alan Rothnie
British Ambassador to Ethiopia
In office
1972–1975
Preceded by Alan Campbell
Succeeded by Derek Day
British Ambassador to Saudi Arabia
In office
1975–1979
Preceded by Philip Adams
Succeeded by Michael Scott Weir
Personal details
Born Willie Morris
1919
Died 13 April 1982
Oxford, England, UK
This article is about the British diplomat. For the American writer, see Willie Morris.

Sir Willie Morris KCMG (1919[1] – 13 April 1982[2]) was a British diplomat from Yorkshire. He joined the Foreign Office in 1947 and retired in 1979.[1] He spent most of his career in the Middle East, and served as the United Kingdom's ambassador to Saudi Arabia (1968–1972), Ethiopia (1972–1975) and Egypt (1975–1979).[3] Morris insisted on the importance of strong ties between the United States and the Arab World, and called on Israel to recognize a Palestinian state in the West Bank.[4] A resident of Oxford, he died there after a brief illness.[2]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b Leigh, David; Evans, Rob (8 June 2007). "Willie Morris". The Guardian. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  2. ^ a b "Sir Willie Morris, A Diplomat" (fee required). The New York Times. Late City Final Edition, Section B: 6. 19 April 1982. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2009-05-04. 
  3. ^ "Previous Ambassadors". UK in Egypt: The official website for the British Embassy in Egypt. Archived from the original on 2009-05-02. Retrieved 2009-05-02. 
  4. ^ Liman, Lewis J. (29 April 1980). "Former Ambassador to Egypt Sees New Mid-East Tensions". The Harvard Crimson. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Sir Horace Phillips
British Ambassador to Saudi Arabia
1968–1972
Succeeded by
Sir Alan Rothnie
Preceded by
Sir Alan Campbell
British Ambassador to Ethiopia
1972–1975
Succeeded by
Derek Day
Preceded by
Sir Philip Adams
British Ambassador to Egypt
1975–1979
Succeeded by
Sir Michael Weir