Wilson County, Kansas

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Wilson County, Kansas
County
Map of Kansas highlighting Wilson County
Location in the U.S. state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1855
Named for Hiero T. Wilson
Seat Fredonia
Largest city Neodesha
Area
 • Total 575 sq mi (1,489 km2)
 • Land 570 sq mi (1,476 km2)
 • Water 4.7 sq mi (12 km2), 0.8%
Population (est.)
 • (2016) 8,723
 • Density 16/sq mi (6/km²)
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5

Wilson County (standard abbreviation: WL) is a county located in the U.S. state of Kansas. As of the 2010 census, the county population was 9,409.[1] Its county seat is Fredonia.[2]

History[edit]

Early history[edit]

For many millennia, the Great Plains of North America was inhabited by nomadic Native Americans. From the 16th century to 18th century, the Kingdom of France claimed ownership of large parts of North America. In 1762, after the French and Indian War, France secretly ceded New France to Spain, per the Treaty of Fontainebleau.

19th century[edit]

In 1802, Spain returned most of the land to France, but keeping title to about 7,500 square miles. In 1803, most of the land for modern day Kansas was acquired by the United States from France as part of the 828,000 square mile Louisiana Purchase for 2.83 cents per acre.

In 1854, the Kansas Territory was organized, then in 1861 Kansas became the 34th U.S. state. In 1855, Wilson County was established.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 575 square miles (1,490 km2), of which 570 square miles (1,500 km2) is land and 4.7 square miles (12 km2) (0.8%) is water.[3]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 27
1870 6,694 24,692.6%
1880 13,775 105.8%
1890 15,286 11.0%
1900 15,621 2.2%
1910 19,810 26.8%
1920 21,157 6.8%
1930 18,646 −11.9%
1940 17,723 −5.0%
1950 14,815 −16.4%
1960 13,077 −11.7%
1970 11,317 −13.5%
1980 12,128 7.2%
1990 10,289 −15.2%
2000 10,332 0.4%
2010 9,409 −8.9%
Est. 2016 8,723 [4] −7.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2016[1]
Age pyramid

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 10,332 people, 4,203 households, and 2,849 families residing in the county. The population density was 18 people per square mile (7/km²). There were 4,937 housing units at an average density of 9 per square mile (3/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.78% White, 0.37% Black or African American, 0.88% Native American, 0.26% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.48% from other races, and 1.19% from two or more races. 1.67% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,203 households out of which 29.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.10% were married couples living together, 7.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.20% were non-families. 29.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.40% under the age of 18, 7.40% from 18 to 24, 23.80% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 19.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 94.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,747, and the median income for a family was $36,990. Males had a median income of $27,255 versus $18,670 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,910. About 7.50% of families and 11.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.40% of those under age 18 and 11.80% of those age 65 or over.

Law and government[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[10]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 77.6% 2,788 16.5% 594 5.8% 209
2012 76.0% 2,825 22.0% 818 2.0% 74
2008 69.2% 2,850 28.4% 1,170 2.5% 101
2004 74.2% 3,263 24.1% 1,060 1.7% 75
2000 67.1% 2,748 29.0% 1,186 3.9% 161
1996 56.4% 2,458 29.8% 1,297 13.8% 602
1992 41.5% 1,925 28.7% 1,331 29.8% 1,379
1988 63.1% 2,743 35.6% 1,545 1.3% 58
1984 72.2% 3,663 26.5% 1,344 1.3% 64
1980 69.3% 3,328 25.1% 1,205 5.6% 268
1976 55.7% 2,682 42.5% 2,047 1.9% 89
1972 74.8% 3,568 21.9% 1,043 3.3% 159
1968 63.4% 3,340 24.2% 1,276 12.4% 656
1964 52.5% 2,919 46.7% 2,592 0.8% 45
1960 67.8% 4,333 31.8% 2,034 0.4% 27
1956 73.0% 4,502 26.7% 1,645 0.3% 20
1952 73.2% 5,180 26.1% 1,845 0.8% 53
1948 59.5% 3,868 39.0% 2,538 1.5% 100
1944 68.6% 4,248 30.9% 1,912 0.6% 35
1940 64.4% 5,288 34.8% 2,859 0.8% 62
1936 55.6% 4,829 43.9% 3,816 0.5% 42
1932 44.9% 3,422 52.5% 4,001 2.5% 193
1928 78.5% 5,603 20.5% 1,465 1.0% 73
1924 65.0% 4,596 24.6% 1,736 10.5% 739
1920 66.2% 4,024 29.1% 1,768 4.7% 284
1916 41.8% 2,970 49.2% 3,494 9.0% 640
1912 19.9% 849 30.6% 1,304 49.5% 2,108[a]
1908 53.1% 2,428 38.9% 1,777 8.0% 364
1904 63.4% 2,583 25.4% 1,034 11.3% 459
1900 55.6% 2,193 43.4% 1,711 1.1% 42
1896 48.4% 1,852 51.2% 1,959 0.4% 17
1892 51.8% 1,803 48.2% 1,678
1888 55.5% 2,191 26.2% 1,035 18.3% 723

Like all of Kansas outside the eastern cities, Wilson County is overwhelmingly Republican. No Democratic Presidential candidate has carried Wilson County since Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932, and none have passed 36 percent since Jimmy Carter in 1976.

Following amendment to the Kansas Constitution in 1986, the county remained a prohibition, or "dry", county until 1998, when voters approved the sale of alcoholic liquor by the individual drink with a 30 percent food sales requirement.[11]

Education[edit]

Unified school districts[edit]

Communities[edit]

2005 KDOT Map of Wilson County from KDOT (map legend)

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Ghost towns[edit]

Townships[edit]

Wilson County is divided into fifteen townships. The cities of Fredonia and Neodesha are considered governmentally independent and are excluded from the census figures for the townships. In the following table, the population center is the largest city (or cities) included in that township's population total, if it is of a significant size.

Sources: 2000 U.S. Gazetteer from the U.S. Census Bureau.
Township FIPS Population
center
Population Population
density
/km² (/sq mi)
Land area
km² (sq mi)
Water area
km² (sq mi)
Water % Geographic coordinates
Cedar 11375 701 8 (19) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.11% 37°31′21″N 95°40′14″W / 37.52250°N 95.67056°W / 37.52250; -95.67056 (Cedar Twp.)
Center 12225 618 6 (16) 103 (40) 0 (0) 0.14% 37°31′5″N 95°49′11″W / 37.51806°N 95.81972°W / 37.51806; -95.81972 (Center Twp.)
Chetopa 13000 188 2 (5) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.11% 37°30′28″N 95°34′14″W / 37.50778°N 95.57056°W / 37.50778; -95.57056 (Chetopa Twp.)
Clifton 14250 414 4 (12) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.53% 37°41′56″N 95°42′23″W / 37.69889°N 95.70639°W / 37.69889; -95.70639 (Clifton Twp.)
Colfax 14825 452 4 (10) 123 (47) 0 (0) 0.17% 37°40′55″N 95°36′20″W / 37.68194°N 95.60556°W / 37.68194; -95.60556 (Colfax Twp.)
Duck Creek 18800 103 1 (3) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.23% 37°26′14″N 95°54′58″W / 37.43722°N 95.91611°W / 37.43722; -95.91611 (Duck Creek Twp.)
Fall River 22825 398 3 (8) 131 (51) 0 (0) 0.16% 37°32′21″N 95°55′33″W / 37.53917°N 95.92583°W / 37.53917; -95.92583 (Fall River Twp.)
Guilford 29200 205 2 (6) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.06% 37°36′32″N 95°43′22″W / 37.60889°N 95.72278°W / 37.60889; -95.72278 (Guilford Twp.)
Neodesha 49675 583 6 (17) 90 (35) 0 (0) 0.52% 37°25′29″N 95°40′52″W / 37.42472°N 95.68111°W / 37.42472; -95.68111 (Neodesha Twp.)
Newark 50200 226 2 (6) 92 (36) 0 (0) 0.18% 37°25′30″N 95°34′56″W / 37.42500°N 95.58222°W / 37.42500; -95.58222 (Newark Twp.)
Pleasant Valley 56650 201 2 (4) 123 (47) 0 (0) 0.09% 37°36′25″N 95°36′21″W / 37.60694°N 95.60583°W / 37.60694; -95.60583 (Pleasant Valley Twp.)
Prairie 57425 118 2 (4) 78 (30) 0 (0) 0.28% 37°36′17″N 95°49′26″W / 37.60472°N 95.82389°W / 37.60472; -95.82389 (Prairie Twp.)
Talleyrand 69900 232 3 (7) 92 (36) 0 (0) 0.06% 37°25′19″N 95°48′25″W / 37.42194°N 95.80694°W / 37.42194; -95.80694 (Talleyrand Twp.)
Verdigris 73500 394 4 (10) 103 (40) 0 (0) 0.27% 37°39′29″N 95°53′51″W / 37.65806°N 95.89750°W / 37.65806; -95.89750 (Verdigris Twp.)
Webster 76300 51 1 (2) 77 (30) 0 (0) 0.15% 37°42′0″N 95°50′1″W / 37.70000°N 95.83361°W / 37.70000; -95.83361 (Webster Twp.)

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ This comprises 1,415 votes (33.21 percent) for Progressive Theodore Roosevelt (who carried the county), and 693 votes (16.26 percent) for Socialist Eugene V. Debs.

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 29, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 29, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 29, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 29, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 29, 2014. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  10. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  11. ^ "Map of Wet and Dry Counties". Alcoholic Beverage Control, Kansas Department of Revenue. November 2006. Retrieved 2007-12-26. 
  12. ^ Rydjord, John (1972). Kansas Place-Names. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma. p. 474. ISBN 0-8061-0994-7. 
  13. ^ Rydjord, John (1972). Kansas Place-Names. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma. p. 88. ISBN 0-8061-0994-7. 

External links[edit]

County
Maps

Coordinates: 37°34′N 95°44′W / 37.567°N 95.733°W / 37.567; -95.733