Wilson County, Tennessee

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Wilson County
County of Wilson
Wilson County Courthouse in Lebanon
Wilson County Courthouse in Lebanon
Official seal of Wilson County
Map of Tennessee highlighting Wilson County
Location within the U.S. state of Tennessee
Map of the United States highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°10′N 86°18′W / 36.16°N 86.3°W / 36.16; -86.3
Country United States
State Tennessee
FoundedOctober 26, 1799
Named forDavid Wilson, early statesman[1]
SeatLebanon
Largest cityMt. Juliet
Area
 • Total583 sq mi (1,510 km2)
 • Land571 sq mi (1,480 km2)
 • Water12 sq mi (30 km2)  2.1%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total147,737 Increase
 • Density258.73/sq mi (99.90/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district6th
Websitewww.wilsoncountytn.com

Wilson County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. It is in Middle Tennessee. As of the 2020 census, the population was 147,737.[2] Its county seat is Lebanon.[3] The largest city is Mt. Juliet.[4] Wilson County is part of the Nashville-DavidsonMurfreesboroFranklin, TN Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Wilson County was created in 1799 from a portion of Sumner County, and named for Major David Wilson, a Revolutionary War veteran and statesman.[1] The county remained predominantly agrarian throughout the 19th century. The arrival of the railroad after the Civil War boosted the county's timber sector, and several large factories were constructed in the county during the early 20th century.[1]

Wilson County was the site of an important saltpeter mine. Saltpeter, the main ingredient of gunpowder, was obtained by leaching the earth from Valley Cave. Valley Cave is near Statesville. The many saltpeter hoppers still inside the cave indicate that this was a large mining operation. These saltpeter vats may date from the War of 1812 mining era or the Civil War mining era, or perhaps both. Further research is needed to determine when this mine was active.[5]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 583 square miles (1,510 km2), of which 571 square miles (1,480 km2) is land and 12 square miles (31 km2) (2.1%) is water.[6] The Cumberland River flows along the county's northern border with Trousdale and Sumner counties. This section of the river is part of Old Hickory Lake. Several streams in the western part of the county are part of the Stones River basin.

Wilson County is home to a large concentration of cedar glades, a unique ecosystem where the soil is too rocky or shallow for trees to grow. Many of these glades are found in Cedars of Lebanon State Park.

Adjacent counties[edit]

Cedar glade in Wilson County

State protected areas[edit]

  • Cedars of Lebanon State Forest
  • Cedars of Lebanon State Park
  • Couchville Cedar Glade State Natural Area (part)
  • Gattinger's Cedar Glade and Barrens State Natural Area (part)
  • John and Hester Land Cedar Glades State Natural Area
  • Old Hickory Wildlife Management Area (part)
  • Percy Priest Wildlife Management Area (part)
  • Vesta Cedar Glade State Natural Area
  • Vine Cedar Glade State Natural Area

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18003,261
182018,730
183025,47236.0%
184024,460−4.0%
185027,44312.2%
186026,072−5.0%
187025,881−0.7%
188028,74711.1%
189027,148−5.6%
190027,078−0.3%
191025,394−6.2%
192026,2413.3%
193023,929−8.8%
194025,2675.6%
195026,3184.2%
196027,6685.1%
197036,99933.7%
198056,06451.5%
199067,67520.7%
200088,80931.2%
2010113,99328.4%
2020147,73729.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2020[2]
Age pyramid Wilson County[11]

2020 census[edit]

Wilson County racial composition[12]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 118,889 80.47%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 10,099 6.84%
Native American 405 0.27%
Asian 3,086 2.09%
Pacific Islander 44 0.03%
Other/Mixed 6,839 4.63%
Hispanic or Latino 8,375 5.67%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 147,737 people, 51,618 households, and 40,874 families residing in the county.

2010 census[edit]

As of the census of 2010,[13] there were 113,993 people, 42,563 households, and 32,177 families living in the county. The population density was 199.64 persons per square mile. The housing unit density was 74.54 units per square mile. The racial makeup of the county was 89.30% White, 6.40% African American, 1.12% Asian, 0.35% Native American, 0.04% Pacific Islander, and 1.46% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origins constituted 3.24% of the population.

Of all of the households, 33.22% had children under the age of 18 living in them, 60.08% were married couples living together, 4.33% had a male householder with no wife present, 11.19% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.40% were non-families. 19.86% of households were one person and 7.29% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.03.

The age distribution was 25.06% under the age of 18, 62.78% ages 18 to 64, and 12.17% age 65 and older. The median age was 39.3 years. 51.02% of the population were females and 48.98% were males.

The median household income was $60,678, and the median family income was $70,092. Males had a median income of $49,293 versus $36,419 for females. The per capita income for the county was $27,814. About 5.6% of families and 7.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.1% of those under the age of 18 and 8.1% of those age 65 and older.

2000 census[edit]

At the 2000 census there were 88,809 people, 32,798 households, and 25,582 families living in the county. The population density was 156 people per square mile (60/km2).[14] There were 34,921 housing units at an average density of 61 per square mile (24/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 91.50% White, 6.26% Black or African American, 0.32% Native American, 0.48% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.48% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. 1.27% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 32,798 households 37.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.20% were married couples living together, 10.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.00% were non-families. 18.10% of households were one person and 6.10% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.03.

The age distribution was 26.20% under the age of 18, 7.70% from 18 to 24, 31.70% from 25 to 44, 24.70% from 45 to 64, and 9.70% 65 or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.80 males.

The median household income was $50,140 and the median family income was $56,650. Males had a median income of $39,848 versus $26,794 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,739. About 4.60% of families and 6.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.80% of those under age 18 and 11.50% of those age 65 or over.


Education[edit]

Wilson County Schools oversees 22 public schools, including 2 adult education centers and a technical education center. The county has five high schools: Mount Juliet High School, Lebanon High School, Wilson Central High School, Green Hill High School, and Watertown High School.

Lebanon Special School District (LSSD) serves most of Lebanon and some unincorporated areas for K-8, though some parts of Lebanon are with Wilson County schools for all years K-12. Wilson County Schools operates the high schools that serve the LSSD territory.[15]

Cumberland University is located in Lebanon.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Statesville

Town[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Other unincorporated communities[edit]

Former community[edit]

Education[edit]

It has two school districts, Lebanon Special School District and Wilson County School District. The latter has all high school zoning in the entire county,[16] while the former has grades K-8 and special education services.[17]

Notable people[edit]

Politics[edit]

In the 2004 U.S. presidential election, 65 percent of voters supported the reelection of President of the United States George W. Bush. In the 2008 U.S. presidential election, 68 percent of voters favored Republican Senator John McCain. Since 2000 (as of 2020), Wilson County has shifted 31.4 points towards the Republican Party.

United States presidential election results for Wilson County, Tennessee[19][20]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 50,296 67.67% 22,254 29.94% 1,780 2.39%
2016 39,406 69.46% 14,385 25.36% 2,943 5.19%
2012 36,109 69.98% 14,695 28.48% 793 1.54%
2008 34,595 67.62% 15,886 31.05% 678 1.33%
2004 28,924 65.07% 15,277 34.37% 251 0.56%
2000 18,844 52.47% 16,561 46.11% 511 1.42%
1996 13,817 46.77% 13,655 46.22% 2,071 7.01%
1992 12,061 40.33% 13,861 46.35% 3,981 13.31%
1988 13,317 61.11% 8,360 38.36% 116 0.53%
1984 12,858 59.95% 8,433 39.32% 158 0.74%
1980 7,535 39.09% 11,248 58.36% 491 2.55%
1976 4,696 30.57% 10,537 68.59% 129 0.84%
1972 6,486 65.77% 3,096 31.40% 279 2.83%
1968 2,736 24.21% 2,916 25.81% 5,648 49.98%
1964 2,707 30.16% 6,267 69.84% 0 0.00%
1960 3,383 40.77% 4,857 58.54% 57 0.69%
1956 2,266 30.04% 5,221 69.21% 57 0.76%
1952 2,449 32.57% 5,070 67.43% 0 0.00%
1948 854 18.17% 3,133 66.67% 712 15.15%
1944 942 23.03% 3,148 76.97% 0 0.00%
1940 655 17.79% 3,020 82.04% 6 0.16%
1936 534 14.65% 3,108 85.27% 3 0.08%
1932 567 17.19% 2,713 82.26% 18 0.55%
1928 1,049 39.07% 1,629 60.67% 7 0.26%
1924 580 21.85% 2,043 76.95% 32 1.21%
1920 1,532 41.45% 2,160 58.44% 4 0.11%
1916 841 24.91% 2,535 75.09% 0 0.00%
1912 682 20.64% 2,325 70.35% 298 9.02%
1908 902 28.95% 2,212 70.99% 2 0.06%
1904 966 28.52% 2,386 70.45% 35 1.03%
1900 1,061 27.86% 2,674 70.20% 74 1.94%
1896 1,568 31.11% 3,436 68.17% 36 0.71%
1892 1,142 27.94% 2,523 61.72% 423 10.35%
1888 1,676 38.31% 2,518 57.55% 181 4.14%
1884 1,234 35.20% 2,191 62.49% 81 2.31%
1880 1,227 28.74% 2,918 68.34% 125 2.93%


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Frank Burns, "Wilson County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: 24 April 2013.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on December 11, 2013. Retrieved December 7, 2013.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on March 2, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ "Mt. Juliet Tennessee". Census.gov. Census.gov. Retrieved October 12, 2018.
  5. ^ Thomas C. Barr, Jr., "Caves of Tennessee", Bulletin 64 of the Tennessee Division of Geology, 1961, 568 pages.
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 14, 2015.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 14, 2015.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved April 14, 2015.
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 14, 2015.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved April 14, 2015.
  11. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  12. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 26, 2021.
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 5, 2019.
  14. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  15. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Wilson County, TN" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 6, 2021.
  16. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Wilson County, TN" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 22, 2022. - Text list
  17. ^ "History". Lebanon Special School District. Retrieved July 22, 2022. The district provides instruction for pre-kindergarten through eighth grade,[...]
  18. ^ "Dixon Merritt, Editor, Dies". The Nashville Tennessean. January 10, 1972. p. 21. Retrieved August 12, 2022.
  19. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  20. ^ http://geoelections.free.fr/. Retrieved January 13, 2021. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°10′N 86°18′W / 36.16°N 86.30°W / 36.16; -86.30