Wilson Road Synagogue

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Wilson Road Synagogue
Facade of the synagogue
Religion
AffiliationJudaism
RiteIndependent Orthodox
Year consecrated1930
StatusConverted to church
Location
LocationSheffield, England
Wilson Road Synagogue is located in Sheffield
Wilson Road Synagogue
Shown within Sheffield
Geographic coordinates53°22′11″N 1°29′56″W / 53.3696°N 1.4988°W / 53.3696; -1.4988Coordinates: 53°22′11″N 1°29′56″W / 53.3696°N 1.4988°W / 53.3696; -1.4988
Architecture
Architect(s)Mansell Jenkinson
TypeSynagogue
StyleNeo-classical
Capacity970

The Wilson Road Synagogue was the largest synagogue in Sheffield in England for much of the twentieth-century.

Sheffield had a Jewish population from the 1780s, and its first synagogue was built in 1851 on Fig Tree Lane in the city centre. However, communal disputes led to a second congregation being established on North Church Street in 1914. This group constructed a synagogue on Wilson Road, near Hunters Bar, in 1930.[1]

Sukkah, with roof part-open

The building was designed by Mansell Jenkinson in a classical style, featuring a portico in the Doric order. It is built of brick, with faience dressings, and also has notable internal features, including a granite ark, choir gallery and hardwood pews.[2][3] The sukkah is in a neighbouring building, designed so that its flat roof can be slid open.[4]

During World War II, the city centre synagogue was destroyed by bombing, and much of its community came to worship at Wilson Road. However, they later established a new building, Kingfield Hall, in Nether Edge. The Jewish population of the city reached about 1,500 in the 1950s, but then entered a long decline. In the 1960s, the two communities joined together, and in 2000, the resulting independent congregation moved to a new building at the Kingfield Hall site.[5] The Wilson Road Synagogue was subsequently converted into a church.[2]

Both synagogue and sukkah were listed at grade II in 1992, along with the boundary wall and gates.[3][4][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Armin Krausz, Sheffield Jewry, p.128
  2. ^ a b Ruth Harman et al, Pevsner Architectural Guide: Sheffield, p.262
  3. ^ a b Historic England. "Synagogue, Wilson Road (1270715)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 7 September 2015.
  4. ^ a b Historic England. "Succah 2 metres south west of synagogue (1254575)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 7 September 2015.
  5. ^ "History of our community". Sheffield Jewish Congregation and Centre. Retrieved 7 September 2015.
  6. ^ Historic England. "Boundary wall and gates to synagogue, Wilson Road (1067334)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 7 September 2015.