WinTuition

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WinTuition
Genre Game show
Presented by Marc Summers
Starring "Gorgeous George" Davidson
Narrated by Burton Richardson
Country of origin United States
No. of seasons 1
Production
Running time 22 minutes
Production company(s) LMNO Cable Group
Fair Dinkum Productions
Sugar Bros. Entertainment
Game Show Originals
Sony Pictures Television
Release
Original channel Game Show Network
Original release December 9, 2002 (2002-12-09) –
April 1, 2003 (2003-04-01)

WinTuition is an American game show created as an original series for Game Show Network, on which it ran from December 9, 2002 to April 1, 2003, with reruns airing until 2004. The game had a school-oriented theme in which three contestants competed to answer questions on general school-based subjects in an attempt to win $50,000 in college tuition. The show was hosted by Marc Summers and announced by Burton Richardson. Henry Winkler served as the show's executive producer.

History[edit]

WinTuition went into production and first aired on GSN in late 2002.[1] The show was produced by Henry Winkler and hosted by Marc Summers, known for his role as the host of the 1980s and 1990s kids' game show Double Dare. Kennedy, who at the time was the host of Friend or Foe?, hosted one episode in 2003 as part of an April Fool's Day prank in which the hosts of Game Show Network's original series traded places.

Burton Richardson announced the show, and a male model identified as "Gorgeous George" Davidson occasionally brought out props related to the questions.

Gameplay[edit]

The main game was divided into twelve levels, or "grades," with each level containing question material appropriate to that particular grade The subject of each grade was announced before the question was asked. All three players started the game with 500 points.

Round 1: Elementary School (1st-5th Grade)[edit]

One buzz-in question per grade level was asked for the first four grades, while in fifth grade every player had a chance to score with either a spelling bee or some other game. Correct answers were worth 100 points each; missed questions cost the player 100. On some episodes, an elementary school age student provided a home viewer question before the commercial break at the end of this round, then gave the answer after the break ended.

Round 2: Middle School (6th-8th Grade)[edit]

Questions in this round had several correct answers, each of which was worth 250 points. Each player got to give one answer, starting with whoever buzzed in first, after which any player who had answered correctly could try to give answers to any or all remaining parts of the question. A miss at any time cost the player no points, but froze him/her out of the rest of the question. Four correct answers were possible in 6th and 7th grades, seven correct in 8th; after all three grades had been played, the lowest-scoring player was "expelled" from the game and went home with the complete 2002 set of the World Book Encyclopedia as a consolation prize.

The first player to give a correct answer in this round won a $200 bonus prize, either as a gift certificate for Domino's Pizza or as quarters ostensibly for "washing machines".

Round 3: High School (9th-12th Grade)[edit]

Players alternated answering questions, one per grade, starting with the leader. Correct answers scored 500 points, while wrong ones deducted 500. In addition, each player could use a "Cut Class" card once in this round, forcing the opponent to answer the question with the goal of reducing his/her score in the event of a miss. The buzzers were not used in this round.

After the 12th grade question, the "Senior Year Showdown" was played, focusing on a single subject chosen from two alternatives offered by Summers. Players continued to answer alternating questions worth 500 points each, starting with the leader. As soon as a player missed a question, he/she was out of the round, meaning that the trailing player would have a chance to catch up if the leader made a mistake. The player with the most points won the game and moved on to the bonus round while the other went home with the World Book Encyclopedia as well as a CD audio system from Fisher Electronics as a consolation prize. The winner received a prize package.

Bonus Round: The $50,000 Final Exam[edit]

Seated at the "Desk of Destiny" (a small wooden school desk), the winner had 60 seconds to answer up to 10 questions in various subjects. He/she could not return to passed or missed questions. A $50,000 college fund was awarded for getting 10 (achieved in three episodes),[1] or $250 for each right answer if the player fell short.

Airing history[edit]

WinTuition aired daily at 8:30 PM eastern time on GSN.[2] The show lasted for one season.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Marc Summers Named Host of 'WinTuition' on Game Show Network; Popular Game Show Host Turns 'Knowledge Into College' on Network Original Series.". PR Newswire. 2002-08-30. Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  2. ^ Byrne, Bridget (2003-01-03). "Winkler employs a new game plan". The Record. Retrieved 2009-03-01.