Winchester (UK Parliament constituency)

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Coordinates: 51°03′47″N 1°19′01″W / 51.063°N 1.317°W / 51.063; -1.317

Winchester
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Winchester in Hampshire.
Outline map
Location of Hampshire within England.
County Hampshire
Electorate 74,138 (December 2010)[1]
Major settlements Winchester, Chandler's Ford, Hiltingbury and Alresford
Current constituency
Created 1918
Member of parliament Steve Brine (Conservative)
Number of members One
1295–1918
Number of members 1295–1885: Two
1885–1918: One
Type of constituency Borough constituency
Overlaps
European Parliament constituency South East England

Winchester is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Steve Brine, a Conservative.

Boundaries[edit]

The constituency comprises the northern bulk of the large City of Winchester District as well as Chandler's Ford and Hiltingbury in the Borough of Eastleigh, and as such is a swathe of mid-Hampshire. The largest settlement is Winchester. Following their review of parliamentary representation in Hampshire, the Boundary Commission for England has created a new seat in the county: a new Meon Valley constituency was formed in 2010 from parts of the old Winchester seat.

History of boundaries

1918-1950: The Municipal Borough of Winchester, the Urban District of Eastleigh and Bishopstoke, the Rural Districts of Hursley and Winchester, and the Rural District of South Stoneham except the civil parish of Bittern.

1950-1955: The Municipal Boroughs of Eastleigh, Romsey, and Winchester, in the Rural District of Romsey and Stockbridge the civil parishes of Ampfield, Chilworth, East Dean, Lockerley, Melchet Park and Plaitford, Michelmersh, Mottisfont, North Baddesley, Nursling and Rownhams, Romsey Extra, Sherfield English, and Wellow, and part of the Rural District of Winchester.

1955-1974: The Municipal Boroughs of Romsey and Winchester, and parts of the Rural Districts of Romsey and Stockbridge, and Winchester.

1974-1983: The Municipal Boroughs of Andover and Winchester, the Rural District of Andover, and parts of the Rural Districts of Romsey and Stockbridge, and Winchester.

1983-1997: The City of Winchester wards of Bishop's Sutton, Bishop's Waltham, Cheriton, Compton, Durley and Upham, Itchen Valley, Littleton, Micheldever, New Alresford, Olivers Battery, Otterbourne and Hursley, Owlesbury and Colden Common, St Barnabas, St Bartholomew, St John and All Saints, St Luke, St Michael, St Paul, Sparsholt, The Worthys, Twyford, Upper Meon Valley, and Wonston, and the District of East Hampshire wards of Alton Holybourne, Alton North East, Alton North West, Alton South East, Alton South West and Beech, Farringdon, Four Marks, Medstead, North Downland and Ropley, and West Tisted.

1997-2010: The City of Winchester.

2010-present: The City of Winchester wards of Colden Common and Twyford, Compton and Otterbourne, Itchen Valley, Kings Worthy, Littleton and Harestock, Olivers Battery and Badger Farm, St Barnabas, St Bartholomew, St John and All Saints, St Luke, St Michael, St Paul, Sparsholt, The Alresfords, and Wonston and Micheldever, and the Borough of Eastleigh wards of Chandler's Ford East, Chandler's Ford West, Hiltingbury East, and Hiltingbury West.

Parliament accepted the Boundary Commission's Fifth Periodic Review of Westminster constituencies by making slight changes to this constituency for the 2010 general election, removing 11 mostly rural wards in and around Bishops Waltham to a new seat, Meon Valley. In return, Winchester gained four suburban and partially urban wards at the northern edge of Eastleigh.[2]

History[edit]

1295–1885[edit]

The chartered city sent burgesses (equivalent to advisory MPs) to the Model Parliament of 1295 and then to most Parliaments convened by the monarch in the medieval period and thereafter; its representation being fixed at two in number during this long period of English history. As is common, major disruption in representation caused by both infrequency of Parliaments convened and allegiance of the incumbents (whether a Royalist or a Parliamentarian) led to sporadic representation during the Protectorate of England and its Commonwealth which followed the end of most fighting during the English Civil War, in this case the stripping of wealth and status from Sir William Ogle followed his being supportive of the wrong faction at the wrong time.

1885–date[edit]

Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 reduced the narrow borough constituency that elected two MPs to only one, permitting the creation of new broader replacement seats in surrounding Hampshire countryside for two abolished boroughs: Andover and Fareham (also known as West and South Hampshire respectively).

Political history

The seat was a Conservative safe seat in terms of majority and length of time held from 1950 until 1997.

At the 1997 general election the incumbent MP Gerry Malone of the Conservative Party was defeated by Mark Oaten of the Liberal Democrats by just two votes. Malone petitioned the result and it was declared void by the High Court on the grounds of mis-stamped ballots having altered the outcome, necessitating a by-election. This was won definitively by Oaten with a very large majority of 21,556, in an election that saw the Labour vote collapse to 1.7% hence the candidate, Patrick Davies, losing his deposit.

The events of 1997 swung the constituency strongly away from its usual status as a fairly safe Conservative seat.

Avoidance of confusion in party names

The candidacy of Richard Huggett in both 1997 elections as a "Literal Democrat" candidate led in part to the creation of the Registration of Political Parties Act 1998.

Oaten stood down at the 2010 general election and was replaced as Liberal Democrat candidate by Martin Tod. Following significant boundary changes, Tod was defeated by Conservative candidate Steve Brine, who took the seat with a majority of 3,048 votes, a modest majority which cannot be described as either marginal or safe.

Prominent frontbenchers

Constituency profile[edit]

The ancient capital of Wessex, Winchester is a cathedral city with the arts and humanities-oriented University and an affluent population. Deprivation levels are very low, and the population is a mix of students, academics, London and Southampton commuters, and those employed locally in high-tech and creative industries.[3]

The only other large settlement in the constituency is Chandler's Ford which has over 21,000 residents and is largely a dormitory town. The constituency also includes several villages, mostly to the north and east of Winchester, including Micheldever, New Alresford and Kings Worthy. Much of the rural territory previously in the constituency was moved to Meon Valley from the 2010 election.

Workless claimants who were registered jobseekers were in November 2012 significantly lower than the national average of 3.8%, at 1.4% of the population based on a statistical compilation by The Guardian.[4]


Members of Parliament[edit]

  • Constituency created (1295)

1295–1660[edit]

Parliament First member Second member
1386 Richard Frye Mark Le Faire[5]
1388 (Feb) Mark Le Faire Gilbert Forster[5]
1388 (Sep) William Wygge John Blake[5]
1390 (Jan) Mark Le Faire John West[5]
1390 (Nov)
1391 Mark Le Faire Gilbert Forster[5]
1393 Mark Le Faire Edmund Picard[5]
1394 John Peverel Richard Gould[5]
1395 Mark Le Faire John Blake[5]
1397 (Jan) Henry Clerk Nicholas Tanner[5]
1397 (Sep) William Bolt Richard Pachford[5]
1399 Mark Le Faire Edmund Picard[5]
1401
1402 John Snell John Steor[5]
1404 (Jan)
1404 (Oct)
1406 Thomas Smale Edmund Picard[5]
1407 John Steor Robert Archer[5]
1410
1411 Mark Le Faire Robert Archer[5]
1413 (Feb) Mark Le Faire William Wood[5]
1413 (May) Mark Le Faire William Wood[5]
1414 (Apr)
1414 (Nov) Mark Le Faire William Wood[5]
1415 Richard Gould Richard Bolt[5]
1416 (Mar) Mark Le Faire William Wood[5]
1416 (Oct) Richard Turnaunt William Reson[5]
1417 Mark Le Faire Richard Turnaunt[5]
1419 Richard Bolt Richard Turnaunt[5]
1420 William Reson William Wood[5]
1421 (May) John French William Wood[5]
1421 (Dec) John French Thomas Cuter[5]
1510-1523 No names known[6]
1529 William Hawles Thomas Coke, died
and replaced after 1532 by
 ?Walter Chandler[6]
1536  ?William Hawles  ?Walter Chandler[6]
1539 Thomas Lee  ?[6]
1542 Walter Chandler  ?[6]
1545  ?
1547 William Honing John Foster[6]
1553 (Mar) Richard Bethell William Lawrence I[6]
1553 (Oct) Richard Bethell William Lawrence I[6]
1554 (Apr) William Lawrence I Robert Hodson[6]
1554 (Nov) William Lawrence I Robert Hodson[6]
1555 William Lawrence I Robert Hodson[6]
1558 Giles White William Lawrence I[6]
1559 (Jan) William Lawrence Robert Bethell[7]
1562 (Dec) William Lawrence Thomas Michelborne[7]
1571 Thomas Michelborne Richard Birde?[7]
1572 (May) Thomas Michelborne, died
and replaced Jan, 1583 by
William Bethell
John Caplyn[7]
1584 (Nov) John Wolley Thomas Fleming I[7]
1586 (Oct) John Wolley Thomas Fleming I[7]
1588 (Oct) Thomas Fleming I Francis Mylles[7]
1593 Sir Edward Stafford Thomas Fleming I[7]
1597 (Oct) William Badger John Moore[7]
1601 (Oct) Edward Cole Sir Thomas Fleming II[7]
1604 John Moore Edward Cole
1614 Sir William Sandys Sir William Bilson
1621 Richard Tichborne William Savage
1624 Richard Tichborne James Lord Wriothesley
1625 Richard Tichborne Sir Thomas Phelipps
1626 Richard Tichborne Henry Whitehead
1628 Richard Tichborne Robert Mason
1629–1640 No Parliaments summoned
1640 (Apr) John Lisle Sir William Ogle
1640 (Nov) John Lisle Sir William Ogle, disabled June 1643
replaced 1645 by
Nicholas Love
1654 John Hildesley
1656 John Hildesley
1659 John Hildesley Nicholas Love
1659 John Lisle Nicholas Love

MPs 1660–1885[edit]

Year First member[8] First party Second member[8] Second party
1660 John Hooke Thomas Cole
1660 Lord St John of Basing
1661 Richard Goddard Lawrence Hyde
1666 Sir Robert Mason
1669 Sir Robert Holmes
1679 Lord Annesley Sir John Cloberry
1685 Roger L'Estrange Charles Hanses
1689 Francis Morley Lord William Powlett
1690 Frederick Tylney
1701 George Rodney Brydges
1710 Thomas Lewis
1714 George Brydges John Popham
1715 Lord William Powlett
1730 Norton Powlett
1734 Paulet St John
1741 William Powlett
1747 Henry Penton
1751 Paulet St John
1754 Marquess of Carnarvon
1761 Henry Penton Lord Harry Powlett
1765 George Paulet
1774 Lovell Stanhope
1783 Henry Flood
1784 Richard Grace Gamon
1796 Henry Temple, 2nd Viscount Palmerston
1802 Sir Henry St John-Mildmay, Bt
1807 Sir Henry St John Carew St John Mildmay
1812 Richard Meyler
1818 James Henry Leigh
1818 Paulet St John-Mildmay
1823 Sir Edward Hyde East
1831 James Buller East Conservative
1832 William Bingham Baring Liberal[9]
1835 Sir James Buller East Conservative[9]
1837 Paulet St John-Mildmay Liberal[9]
1841 Bickham Escott Conservative[9]
1847 John Bonham Carter Liberal[9]
1864 Thomas Willis Fleming Conservative[9]
1865 William Barrow Simonds Conservative[9]
1874 Arthur Robert Naghten Conservative[9]
1880 Viscount Baring Liberal Richard Moss Conservative[9]
1885 Representation reduced to one member

MPs since 1885[edit]

Election Member[8] Party
1885 Arthur Loftus Tottenham Conservative
1888 by-election Richard Moss Conservative
1892 William Myers Conservative
1906 Guy Baring Conservative
1916 by-election Douglas Carnegie Conservative
1917 National Party
1918 Sir George Hennessy Coalition Conservative
1922 Conservative
1931 Sir Robert Geoffrey Ellis Conservative
1935 Gerald Palmer Conservative
1945 George Jeger Labour
1950 Peter Smithers Conservative
1964 by-election Morgan Morgan-Giles Conservative
1979 John Ernest Douglas Delavalette Browne Conservative
1992 Gerry Malone Conservative
1997 Mark Oaten Liberal Democrat
2010 Steve Brine Conservative

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General Election 2015: Winchester[10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Steve Brine 30,425 55.0 +6.5
Liberal Democrat Jackie Porter 13,511 24.4 -18.7
Labour Mark Chaloner 4,613 8.3 +2.9
UKIP Martin Lyon 4,122 7.5 +5.4
Green Michael Wilks 2,645 4.8 N/A
Majority 16,914 30.6 +25.2
Turnout 53,316 74.6 -1.2
Conservative hold Swing +12.6
General Election 2010: Winchester[11][12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Steve Brine 27,155 48.5 +11.2
Liberal Democrat Martin Tod 24,107 43.1 −7.0
Labour Patrick Davies 3,051 5.5 −3.9
UKIP Jocelyn Penn-Bull 1,139 2.0 −0.2
English Democrat Mark Lancaster 503 0.9 N/A
Majority 3,048 5.4 +18.2
Turnout 55,955 75.8 +3.9
Conservative gain from Liberal Democrat Swing +9.1

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General Election 2005: Winchester[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Mark Oaten 31,225 50.6 −4.0
Conservative George Hollingbery 23,749 38.5 +0.2
Labour Patrick Davies 4,782 7.8 +1.9
UKIP David Abbott 1,321 2.1 +1.0
Independent Arthur Uther Pendragon 581 0.9 N/A
Majority 7,473 12.1
Turnout 61,655 71.9 −0.4
Liberal Democrat hold Swing −2.1
General Election 2001: Winchester[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Mark Oaten 32,282 54.6 +12.5
Conservative Andrew Hayes 22,648 38.3 -3.8
Labour Stephen Wyeth 3,498 5.9 -4.6
UKIP Joan Martin 664 1.1 +0.4
Wessex Regionalist Henrietta Rous 66 0.1 N/A
Majority 9,634 16.3
Turnout 59,158 72.3 -6.0
Liberal Democrat hold Swing

Note: The percentage differences are compared to the previous general election poll, not the by-election.

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

Winchester by-election, 1997[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Mark Oaten 37,006 68.0 +26
Conservative Gerry Malone 15,450 28.4 −13.6
Labour Patrick Davies 944 1.7 −8.8
UKIP Robin Page 521 1.0 +0.2
Monster Raving Loony Screaming Lord Sutch 316 0.6 +0.1
Literal Democrat Richard Huggett 59 0.1 −0.9
Natural Law Rosemary Barry 48 0.1 +0.1
Independent Conservative Roger Everest 40 0.1 +0.1
Majority 21,556 39.6
Turnout 68.7
Liberal Democrat gain from Conservative Swing
General Election 1997: Winchester[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Mark Oaten 26,100 42.1 +4.3
Conservative Gerry Malone 26,098 42.1 −8.0
Labour Patrick Davies 6,528 10.5 +3.1
Referendum Peter Strand 1,598 2.6 +2.6
"Liberal Democrat Top Choice for Parliament" Richard Huggett 640 1.0 +1.0
UKIP Derek Rumsey 476 0.8 +0.8
Independent John Ernest Douglas Delavalette Browne 307 0.5 −4.2
Monster Raving Loony Peter Stockton 307 0.5 +0.5
Majority 2
Turnout 62,054
Void election result Swing

Note: The result reflects the official return made at the time. It was subsequently declared void upon petition. Because of the presence on the ballot paper of Richard Huggett as "Liberal Democrat Top Choice for Parliament", Oaten used the description "Liberal Democrat: Leader: Paddy Ashdown" to identify himself as the official Liberal Democrat candidate.

General Election 1992: Winchester[17][18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Gerry Malone 33,113 50.1 −2.3
Liberal Democrat AD Barron 24,992 37.8 −2.4
Labour PJ Jenks 4,917 7.4 +0.9
Independent Conservative John Ernest Douglas Delavalette Browne 3,095 4.7 +4.7
Majority 8,121 12.3 +0.1
Turnout 66,117 83.2 +2.8
Conservative hold Swing +0.1

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General Election 1987: Winchester[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Ernest Douglas Delavalette Browne 32,195 52.4 −5.2
Social Democratic John Lang MacDonald 24,716 40.2 +6.2
Labour Fred Inglis 4,028 6.6 −1.6
Green Julie Patricia Walker 565 0.9 N/A
Majority 7,479 12.2 −11.4
Turnout 76,507 80.4 +4.2
Conservative hold Swing −5.7
General Election 1983: Winchester[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Ernest Douglas Delavalette Browne 31,908 57.56
Social Democratic J. MacDonald 18,861 34.02
Labour W.H. Allchin 4,512 8.14
Wessex Regionalist S. Winkworth 155 0.28
Majority 13,047 23.54
Turnout 76.16
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General Election 1979: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Ernest Douglas Delavalette Browne 38,198 56.01
Labour W.H. Allchin 15,378 22.55
Liberal J. Morgan 14,228 20.86
Wessex Regionalist M. Mahoney 395 0.58
Majority 22,820 33.46
Turnout 78.02
Conservative hold Swing
General Election October 1974: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Morgan Charles Morgan-Giles 27,671 44.43
Liberal J.W. Matthew 18,451 29.63
Labour W.H. Allchin 16,153 25.94
Majority 9,220 14.81
Turnout 75.22
Conservative hold Swing
General Election February 1974: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Morgan Charles Morgan-Giles 30,843 46.15
Liberal J.W. Matthew 20,339 30.43
Labour W.H. Allchin 15,655 23.42
Majority 10,504 15.72
Turnout 81.49
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1970: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Morgan Charles Morgan-Giles 25,249 55.02
Labour Christopher Perry 11,773 25.66
Liberal John W. Matthew 8,867 19.32
Majority 13,476 29.37
Turnout 74.56
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s[edit]

General Election 1966: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Morgan Charles Morgan-Giles 21,162 51.57
Labour Stanley E. Spicer 12,485 30.42
Liberal E Terence S. Read 7,390 18.01
Majority 8,677 21.14
Turnout 77.87
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1964: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Morgan Charles Morgan-Giles 21,502 53.08
Labour C Patrick Seyd 12,495 30.85
Liberal E Terence S. Read 6,510 16.07
Majority 9,007 22.24
Turnout 79.79
Conservative hold Swing
Winchester by-election, 1964[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Morgan Charles Morgan-Giles 18,032 52.17
Labour C Patrick Seyd 11,968 34.62
Liberal J. Edwards 4,567 13.21
Majority 6,064 17.54
Turnout 34567
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s[edit]

General Election 1959: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Henry Berry Otway Smithers 24,924 67.26
Labour Mrs. Margaret J. Manning 12,132 32.74
Majority 12,792 44.52
Turnout 76.69
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1955: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Henry Berry Otway Smithers 23,827 65.43
Labour Jasper Godwin Ridley 12,591 34.57
Majority 11,236 30.85
Turnout 76.73
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1951: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Henry Berry Otway Smithers 31,700 56.49
Labour Eric Charles Neate 24,418 43.51
Majority 7,282 12.98
Turnout 83.66
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1950: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Henry Berry Otway Smithers 31,462 56.77
Labour L.F. Cornillie 23,955 43.23
Majority 7,507 13.55
Turnout 84.02
Conservative gain from Labour Swing

Election in the 1940s[edit]

General Election 1945: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour George Jeger 30,290 52.63
Conservative Gerald Eustace Howell Palmer 27,259 47.37
Majority 3,031 5.27
Turnout 71.70
Labour gain from Conservative Swing

Elections in the 1930s[edit]

General Election 1935: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Gerald Eustace Howell Palmer 28,506 64.43
Labour Arthur Leonard Williams 15,739 35.57
Majority 12,767 28.86
Turnout 71.15
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1931: Winchester
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Sir Robert Geoffrey Ellis 31,131 69.71
Labour Robert Arthur Lyster 13,529 30.29
Majority 17,602 39.41
Turnout 77.14
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1920s[edit]

General Election 1929: Winchester [22]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist Sir George Richard James Hennessy 17,560 44.8
Labour Robert Arthur Lyster 14,326 36.6
Liberal Frances Louise Josephy 7,278 18.6
Majority 3,234 8.2
Turnout
Unionist hold Swing
West
General Election 1923: Winchester [23]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist George Richard James Hennessy 11240 46.8
Labour Albert Reginald Stamp 6,495 27.1
Liberal William James West 6,252 26.1
Majority 4,745 19.7 -10.9
Turnout 67.9
Unionist hold Swing

Election results 1885-1918[edit]

Elections in the 1880s[edit]

General Election 1885: Winchester [24][25][26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Arthur Loftus Tottenham 1,153 54.0 n/a
Liberal Viscount Baring 982 46.0 n/a
Majority 171 8.0 n/a
Turnout 91.8
Conservative win
General Election 1886: Winchester [24][25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Arthur Loftus Tottenham 1,119 58.8 +4.8
Liberal Thomas Newcomen Archibald Grove 783 41.2 -4.8
Majority 336 17.6 +9.6
Turnout 81.8 -10.0
Conservative hold Swing +4.8
Winchester by-election, 1888 [24][25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Moss 1,364 61.6
Liberal Philip Vanderbyl 849 38.4
Majority 515 23.2
Turnout 90.1
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1890s[edit]

Myers
General Election 1892: Winchester [24][25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative William Henry Myers 1,213 58.5 -3.1
Liberal Charles William Mathews 859 41.5 +3.1
Majority 354 17.0 -6.2
Turnout 86.6 -3.5
Conservative hold Swing -3.1
General Election 1895: Winchester [24][25][27]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative William Henry Myers unopposed n/a n/a
Conservative hold Swing n/a

Elections in the 1900s[edit]

Hemmerde
General Election 1900: Winchester [24][25][28]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative William Henry Myers 1,342 61.3 n/a
Liberal Edward George Hemmerde 846 38.7 n/a
Majority 496 22.6 n/a
Turnout 81.6 n/a
Conservative hold Swing n/a
McCurdy
General Election 1906: Winchester [24][25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Guy Victor Baring 1,322 51.0 -10.3
Liberal Charles Albert McCurdy 1272 49.0 +10.3
Majority 50 2.0 -20.6
Turnout 87.0 +5.4
Conservative hold Swing -10.3

Elections in the 1910s[edit]

Baring
General Election January 1910: Winchester [24][29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Guy Victor Baring 1,729 57.7 +6.7
Liberal George William Ricketts 1,268 42.3 -6.7
Majority 461 15.4 +13.4
Turnout 93.7 +6.7
Conservative hold Swing +6.7
General Election December 1910: Winchester [24][30]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Guy Victor Baring 1,719 60.5
Liberal George William Ricketts 1,121 39.5
Majority 598 21.0
Turnout 88.7
Conservative hold Swing

General Election 1914/15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

Winchester by-election, 1916 [24][31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Douglas George Carnegie 1,218 72.0 +11.5
Independent Henry Charles Woods 473 28.0 n/a
Majority 745 44.0 +23.0
Turnout 52.0 -35.3
Conservative hold Swing n/a

See also[edit]

Notes and References[edit]

Notes
References
  1. ^ "Electorate Figures - Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Retrieved 13 March 2011. 
  2. ^ 2010 post-revision map non-metropolitan areas and unitary authorities of England
  3. ^ 2011 Census - Key Statistics - Industries
  4. ^ Unemployment claimants by constituency The Guardian
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z History of Parliament - constituencies Accessed 2011-10-02
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "History of Parliament". Retrieved 2011-10-02. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "History of Parliament". Retrieved 2011-10-02. 
  8. ^ a b c Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "W" (part 4)[self-published source][better source needed]
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i Craig, F. W. S. (1989) [1977]. British parliamentary election results 1832–1885 (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp. 334–335. ISBN 0-900178-26-4. 
  10. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  11. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  12. ^ "BBC NEWS – Election 2010 – Winchester". BBC News. 
  13. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  14. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  15. ^ United Kingdom Election Results
  16. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  17. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  18. ^ "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 2010-12-06. 
  19. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  20. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  21. ^ "1964 By Election Results". Archived from the original on 2009-08-31. Retrieved 2015-09-19. 
  22. ^ British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949, FWS Craig
  23. ^ British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949, FWS Craig
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j British Parliamentary Election Results 1885-1918, FWS Craig
  25. ^ a b c d e f g The Liberal Year Book, 1907
  26. ^ Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1886
  27. ^ Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1901
  28. ^ Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1901
  29. ^ Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1916
  30. ^ Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1916
  31. ^ Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1916