Winrock International

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Winrock International is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to increase economic opportunity, sustain natural resources, and protect the environment.[1] Based in Little Rock, Arkansas and Washington, D.C., Winrock is named for Winthrop Rockefeller, who served as the 37th governor of Arkansas.[2][3]

History[edit]

In 1953, Winthrop Rockefeller founded Winrock Enterprises and Winrock Farms in Morrilton, Arkansas.[4][5] Winrock Farms served as a model facility to test and demonstrate agricultural practices that other farmers could emulate.[6]

After his death, Rockefeller’s trustees created the Winrock International Livestock Research and Training Center.[7][8] In 1985, the center merged with two other Rockefeller organizations — the Agricultural Development Council (founded by John D. Rockefeller III) and the International Agricultural Development Service (founded by the Rockefeller Foundation).[9][10][11][12] The newly merged organization became known as Winrock International.[13][14]

Initiatives[edit]

Winrock’s projects are focused on four main areas: agriculture,[15] economic development,[16][17] energy and environment,[18][19][20][21][22][23] and human and social capital.[24][25] More than 95% of the organization’s funding comes from the U.S. government, primarily the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

Winrock initiatives include:

• The American Carbon Registry, the first private, voluntary greenhouse-gas registry.[26][27][28] • The Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub, a makerspace that provides facilities, technology, support and equipment for entrepreneurs, artists and makers.[29][30] • Farmer-to-Farmer, a USAID-funded program that sends American agricultural experts to the developing world to provide technical assistance to farmers, agribusinesses, and other groups involved with food production.[31][32][33][34] • Innovate Arkansas, a project funded by the Arkansas Economic Development Commission that helps the state’s technology entrepreneurs move from the startup phase to commercial viability.[35][36] • The Wallace Center, an initiative which convenes producers, businesses and consumers to build healthier food systems and develop regional food hubs.[37][38]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Laurie, Mary. "Winrock International - Encyclopedia of Arkansas". The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture. The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  2. ^ Kirk, John. "The life of Winthrop Rockefeller". Arkansas Times. Arkansas Times. Retrieved August 3, 2018.
  3. ^ Walsh, John. "Nonprofits That Cultivate Development Are Merging". Science Magazine. Science Magazine. Retrieved August 8, 2018.
  4. ^ Walsh, John. "Nonprofits That Cultivate Development Are Merging". Science Magazine. Science Magazine. Retrieved August 8, 2018.
  5. ^ Higgins, Donald. "Petit Jean Mountain". The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture. The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture. Retrieved August 8, 2018.
  6. ^ Payne, Cassie. "Winrock Farms: At home in Arkansas". Progressive Cattleman. Progressive Cattleman. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  7. ^ Walsh, John. "Nonprofits That Cultivate Development Are Merging". Science Magazine. Science Magazine. Retrieved August 8, 2018.
  8. ^ "Farmer-to-Farmer International Leader". Arkansas Times. Arkansas Times. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  9. ^ Walsh, John. "Nonprofits That Cultivate Development Are Merging". Science Magazine. Science Magazine. Retrieved August 8, 2018.
  10. ^ "Sterling Wortman". Rockefeller Foundation. Rockefeller Foundation. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  11. ^ Daniels, Lee. "Arthur Mosher, 82, International Expert On Agricultural Aid". nytimes.com. The New York Times. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  12. ^ Griffith, Susan. "Wharton, Jr., Clifton Reginald (1926- )". BlackPast.org. BlackPast.org. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  13. ^ Walsh, John. "Nonprofits That Cultivate Development Are Merging". Science Magazine. Science Magazine. Retrieved August 8, 2018.
  14. ^ "Farmer-to-Farmer International Leader". Arkansas Times. Arkansas Times. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  15. ^ Mendoza, Naki. "Myanmar's journey to specialty coffee and its lessons for smallholder farmers". Devex. Devex. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  16. ^ Menur, Ansia. "Smart Fish Feeder eFishery Enters Bangladesh and Thailand, Secured 300 Users in Indonesia". Yahoo.com. Yahoo News. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  17. ^ "Feed the Future Through USAID and Winrock International Launch Innovation Challenge to Bring New Technologies to Smallholder Farmers". USAID. USAID. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  18. ^ Rogers, Kelli. "Winrock connects the dots between illegal logging and climate change". Devex. Devex. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  19. ^ "Second Renewable Energy Stakeholder Forum". USAID. USAID. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  20. ^ Jain, Neha. "Deforestation vs. Degradation: How we underestimate tropical forest greenhouse gas emissions". Mongabay. Mongabay. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  21. ^ Rogers, Kelli. "Development actors bet on political power shift to save Cambodia's forgotten forest". Devex. Devex. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  22. ^ Warren, Chris. "Water from the Sun: Solar-Powered Water Pumps Offer African Farmers a Way Out of Poverty". Green Tech Media. Green Tech Media. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  23. ^ Warren, Chris. "In Nigeria, a Template for Solar-Powered Minigrids Emerges". Green Tech Media. Green Tech Media. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  24. ^ "USAID Announces New Project to Counter Trafficking in Persons in Asia". USAID. USAID. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  25. ^ Chandran, Rina. "From Cambodia to India, Job Matching Sites and Mobile Apps Take Aim at Trafficking". Reuters. Reuters. Retrieved July 23, 2018.
  26. ^ Jared, George. "Arkansas Rice Farmers Among the First in the U.S. to Receive Carbon Credits for Sustainable Practices". Talk Business and Politics. Talk Business and Politics. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  27. ^ Bjerga, Alan. "How U.S. Rice Farmers Could Slash Their Emissions (and Costs)". Bloomberg. Bloomberg. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  28. ^ "Farmer-to-Farmer International Leader". Arkansas Times. Arkansas Times. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  29. ^ Brown, Jeffery. "Who becomes an inventor? This Arkansas innovation hub is trying to spark a new generation". PBS.org. Public Broadcasting Service. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  30. ^ "Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub: What We Do". arjun.org. Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub.
  31. ^ "The John Ogonowski and Doug Bereuter Farmer-to-Farmer Program". USAID.gov. USAID. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  32. ^ Marshall, Sam. "NC State Extension in Guinea: A Volunteer Experience". NCSU.edu. North Carolina State University. Retrieved August 1, 2018.
  33. ^ Hehemann, Will. "UAPB Extension Specialist Teaches Young Farmers in Bangladesh". uapb.edu. The Commercial.
  34. ^ "Farmer-to-Farmer International Leader". Arkansas Times. Arkansas Times. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  35. ^ Brawner, Steve. "Winrock International, Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub Merge; Governor Praises the Move". TalkBusiness.net. Talk Business and Politics. Retrieved July 24, 2018.
  36. ^ Cater, Mark. "Innovate Arkansas Helping Build Tech Startup Scene". ArkansasBusines.com. Arkansas Business. Retrieved August 3, 2018.
  37. ^ Dalmut, Hanne. "Public-Private Partnerships to Lead Next Agricultural Revolution". thehill.com. The Hill.
  38. ^ Newton, Patrick. "Partner Profile: The Wallace Center at Winrock International". https://clintonschool.uasys.edu. University of Arkansas Clinton School of Public Service. Retrieved August 8, 2018. External link in |website= (help)