Winter of Our Dreams

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Winter of Our Dreams
Winter of Our Dreams.jpg
DVD cover
Directed by John Duigan
Produced by Richard Mason
Written by John Duigan
Starring Judy Davis
Bryan Brown
Baz Luhrmann
Music by Sharon Calcraft
Cinematography Tom Cowan
Edited by Henry Dangar
Release date
31 July 1981
Running time
89 minutes
Country Australia
Language English
Budget AU$320,000[1]
Box office $959,000 (Australia)

Winter of Our Dreams is a 1981 Australian film directed by John Duigan. Judy Davis won the Best Actress in a Lead Role in the AFI Awards for her performance in the film. The film was nominated in 6 other categories also.[2] It was also entered into the 13th Moscow International Film Festival where Judy Davis won the award for Best Actress.[3]

Rob (Bryan Brown), a bookshop owner, hears of the suicide of an old girlfriend Lisa (Margie McCrae). While investigating the case he meets Lou (Judy Davis), a prostitute and old friend of Lisa's.

Cast[edit]

  • Judy Davis as Lou
  • Bryan Brown as Rob
  • Cathy Downes as Gretel
  • Baz Luhrmann as Pete
  • Peter Mochrie as Tim
  • Mervyn Drake as Mick
  • Margie McCrae as Lisa Blaine
  • Joy Hruby as Marge
  • Kim Deacon as Michelle

Production[edit]

In the late 1970s Duigan wrote a script called Someone Left the Cake Out in the Rain about a European anti-nuclear campaigner who comes to Australia and meets a 60s radical turned yuppie. The film was never made but the former radical character was re used in Winter of Our Dreams.[1]

There were three weeks of rehearsals and five weeks of shooting in Kings Cross and Balmain.[1]

Box office[edit]

Winter of Our Dreams was popular, grossing $959,000 at the box office in Australia,[4] which is equivalent to $3,107,160 in 2009 dollars.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c David Stratton, The Avocado Plantation: Boom and Bust in the Australian Film Industry, Pan MacMillan, 1990 p138
  2. ^ IMDb - awards
  3. ^ "13th Moscow International Film Festival (1983)". MIFF. Retrieved 2013-01-31. 
  4. ^ Film Victoria - Australian Films at the Australian Box Office

Further reading[edit]

  • Murray, Scott, ed. (1994). Australian Cinema. St.Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin/AFC. p. 312. ISBN 1-86373-311-6. 

External links[edit]