Winterslow

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Winterslow
All Saints Parish Church - Winterslow - geograph.org.uk - 472222.jpg
All Saints parish church
Winterslow is located in Wiltshire
Winterslow
Winterslow
Winterslow shown within Wiltshire
Population 2,064 (in 2011)[1]
OS grid reference SU2332
Civil parish
  • Winterslow
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Salisbury
Postcode district SP5
Dialling code 01980
Police Wiltshire
Fire Dorset and Wiltshire
Ambulance South Western
EU Parliament South West England
UK Parliament
Website Parish Council
List of places
UK
England
Wiltshire
51°05′38″N 1°39′43″W / 51.094°N 1.662°W / 51.094; -1.662Coordinates: 51°05′38″N 1°39′43″W / 51.094°N 1.662°W / 51.094; -1.662

Winterslow is a civil parish with a population of around 2,000, located about 6 miles (10 km) northeast of Salisbury in Wiltshire, England, south of the A30 London Road. It is sited on the Roman road between Old Sarum and Winchester.

Settlements in the parish are the villages of West Winterslow and Middle Winterslow, and the hamlets of East Winterslow and The Common.

History[edit]

The area has evidence of prehistoric settlements, including Bronze Age features[2] and an Iron Age hillfort at Ashley's Copse.[3]

Middle Winterslow is located along a Roman road towards Old Sarum. The three settlements (today's West, Middle and East Winterslow) are recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as Wintreslei,[4] meaning "Winter's mound or burial place".[5]

The Winterslows developed as separate manors, with Middle Winterslow known for a time as Middleton.[5] As recently as 1958, the village around All Saints' church was named on maps as Winterslow, with West Winterslow adjacent to its southeast.[6] On current maps and road signs, both areas are West Winterslow.

Governance[edit]

The civil parish elects a parish council. It is in the area of Wiltshire Council unitary authority, which is responsible for all significant local government functions.

An electoral ward in the same name exists. This ward starts on the outskirts of Salisbury in the south west and stretches in a northeasterly direction to Winterslow. The total ward population taken at the 2011 census was 3,894.[7]

Churches and chapels[edit]

The Church of England parish church of All Saints at West Winterslow is Grade II* listed.[8] It has 12th-century origins but was rebuilt in the 19th century by T.H. Wyatt.[9]

A chapel of ease dedicated to St John the Baptist was opened at The Common in 1860.[10]

A Methodist chapel was built at The Common in 1810; the present building dates from 1865.[11]

An Evangelical church, the Gospel Lifeboat Mission, was opened at Middle Winterslow in 1891. The present building is from 1979.[12]

Winterslow Baptist Church, at West Winterslow, is a tin tabernacle built in 1908.[13][14]

Notable buildings[edit]

Roche Old Court[15] (early 17th century) and Roche Court[16] (1805), near East Winterslow, are Grade II* listed.

Notable people[edit]

William Hazlitt (1778–1830), writer and critic, lived here. Peter Bellinger Brodie (1778–1854, conveyancer) and his brother Sir Benjamin Collins Brodie (1783–1862, pioneering physiologist and surgeon) were born here.

Amenities[edit]

Winterslow CE Primary School, Middle Winterslow, serves the parish and nearby villages.[17] It was built as a National School in 1856 and educated children of all ages until 1962.[18]

At Middle Winterslow is a large modern village hall with a tennis court. There are two pubs: the Lord Nelson at Middle Winterslow and the Lion's Head at The Common.

Roche Court near East Winterslow has a sculpture park and gallery.[19]

The Clarendon Way long-distance footpath passes through Middle Winterslow and West Winterslow; its route along the Roman road is shared with the Monarch's Way.

Development controversy[edit]

A housing development at Middle Winterslow was proposed in 2011[20] and met with objections from some residents.[21] As of July 2015 the plans are not yet approved.[22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Wiltshire Community History – Census". Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  2. ^ Historic England. "Bell barrow, bowl barrow and section of hollow way 600m NNW of Long Orchard (1013983)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  3. ^ Historic England. "Iron Age hillfort in Ashley's Copse (1001796)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  4. ^ East and West Winterslow in the Domesday Book
  5. ^ a b "Winterslow". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  6. ^ "SU23". Ordnance Survey maps. National Library of Scotland. 1958. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  7. ^ "Ward population 2011". Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 18 March 2015. 
  8. ^ Historic England. "Church of All Saints, Winterslow (1299950)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  9. ^ "Church of All Saints, Winterslow". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  10. ^ "St. John's Chapel School, Winterslow". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  11. ^ "Winterslow Methodist Church". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  12. ^ "Gospel Lifeboat Mission". Winterslow village. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  13. ^ "Winterslow Baptist Church". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  14. ^ "Winterslow Baptist". Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  15. ^ Historic England. "Roche Old Court (1300012)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  16. ^ Historic England. "Roche Court (1300004)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  17. ^ "Winterslow CE Primary School". Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  18. ^ "Winterslow C. of E. Aided Primary School". Wiltshire Community History. Wiltshire Council. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  19. ^ "New Art Centre". Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  20. ^ "Land at Middleton Road, Winterslow" (PDF). Savills for Primetower. Retrieved 30 July 2015. 
  21. ^ Harding, Jill (9 May 2011). "WOOD campaign gathers pace". Salisbury Journal. Retrieved 30 July 2015. 
  22. ^ Kemble, Elizabeth (2 May 2015). "Farmer close to victory after £20,000 battle to keep his land". Salisbury Journal. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Winterslow at Wikimedia Commons