Wisting (TV series)

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Wisting
GenreScandinavian noir
police procedural
thriller
Created byTrygve Allister Diesen
Kathrine Valen Zeiner
Based onThe Caveman
The Hunting Dogs
by Jørn Lier Horst
Screenplay byVegard Steiro Amundsen
Anne Elvedal
Kjersti Ugelstad
Trygve Allister Diesen
Kathrine Valen Zeiner
Directed byTrygve Allister Diesen
Katarina Launing
StarringSven Nordin
Carrie-Anne Moss
Mads Ousdal
Thea Green Lundberg
ComposersOle Bo
Jacob Groth
Sören Möller
Country of originNorway
Original languagesEnglish
Norwegian
No. of seasons1
No. of episodes10
Production
Executive producersJulia Angelin
Alexander Eik
Silje Hopland Eik
Anni Faurbye Fernandez
Jørn Lier Horst
Fredrik Ljungberg
Nanna Mailand-Mercado
Jakob Mejlhede
Matilde Nørgaard
ProducerTerez Hollo-Klausen
CinematographyLinus Eklund
Jørgen Johansson
Ian N. Tomkins
Håvar Karlsen
EditorSofia Lindgren
Running time45 minutes
Production companiesCinenord
Good Company
Budget€12 million
Release
Original networkViaplay
TV3 (Viasat)
Original releaseApril 11, 2019 (2019-04-11)

Wisting is a Norwegian police procedural television series starring Sven Nordin as widower William Wisting, a senior police detective, and in the first five episodes, co-starring Carrie-Anne Moss as FBI Special Agent Maggie Griffin.[1]

Wisting is the most expensive television drama series produced in Norway. This ten episodes thriller is based on two Jørn Lier Horst novels, The Caveman (2012) and The Hunting Dogs (2013). In episodes 1–5, Wisting heads a murder investigation with FBI collaboration since the suspect is a serial killer hunted in the US. In episodes 6-10, Wisting has to defend himself against accusations of tampering with evidence in a previous murder case.[2]

Plot[edit]

A man's body is found, hidden in the snow, under a tree on a Christmas tree farm near Larvik, Norway. This is investigated by William Wisting and his team of detectives. Fingerprints link the death to Robert Godwin, an American serial killer who has been on the run for more than 20 years. He is believed to have fled to Larvik, "hiding in plain sight", having assumed the identity of a local resident. In response the FBI sends Special Agents Maggie Griffin and John Bantham to assist the Norwegian investigation. But they must keep their presence secret to avoid alerting the killer, who they fear will flee again. Wisting's daughter, Line, is a journalist writing a story about their next-door neighbour, who had died alone in his house. Unwittingly, her investigating opens up connections with the police murder investigation and she becomes a target. Line's liaison with Bantham, allowing her to discover his identity, compromises his cover. Meanwhile, the police discover the killer's principal dumpsite, the body count sharply rises and the hunt moves over the border into Sweden before Wisting and Griffin corner the killer in a dramatic climax.

Wisting appears on a national television show to discuss the Robert Godwin case. Instead he is ambushed by Philip Henden, a lawyer representing Vidar Haglund, who was jailed for 17 years in a different murder case. Now released, Haglund has always maintained his innocence. The crucial DNA evidence, placing him at the crime scene, is shown to have been tampered with, so Wisting is suspended while the investigation is carried out. Line Wisting is outraged that her father is being hounded by the newspaper for which she works and resolves to clear his name, but a murder case she is working on starts to become connected to everything else.

Cast[edit]

  • Sven Nordin as William Wisting, police detective
  • Carrie-Anne Moss as Maggie Griffin, FBI Special Agent
  • Thea Green Lundberg as Line, Wisting's daughter, journalist
  • Jonas Strand Gravli as Thomas, Wisting's son
  • Kjersti Sandal as Torunn Borg, Wisting's deputy
  • Mads Ousdal as Nils Hammer, police detective
  • Mariann Hole as Sissel
  • Lars Berge as Benjamin Fjeld, police detective
  • Richie Campbell as John Bantham, FBI Special Agent
  • Ulrikke Hansen Døvigen as Christine Thiis, police prosecutor
  • Irina Eidsvold Tøien as Andrea Vetti, police chief
  • Gard B. Eidsvold as Frank Robekk, retired police detective
  • Fridtjov Såheim as Philip Henden, lawyer
  • Christoffer Staib as Vidar Haglund, hunted murderer
  • Lasse Vermeli as Erik, press photographer
  • Jon Øigarden as Terje Nordbo, Chief Inspector, Independent Office for Police Conduct

Production[edit]

Wisting is based on two books by Jørn Lier Horst namely The Caveman (2012) and The Hunting Dogs (2013).[3] Horst is a best-selling author in Norway and has been translated into over 30 languages. Filming started in January 2018 on a 150-day schedule.[4] The adaptation was written by Trygve Allister Diesen and Kathrine Valen Zeiner. Diesen also directed episodes along with Katarina Launing.[5]

Wisting had a budget of NOK 110 million (€11.4 million). This sum incorporated a €1 million grant from Creative Europe as well as a grant of NOK 26.05 million (€2.7 million) from the Norwegian Film Institute.[4] This makes the show the most expensive drama ever produced in Norway.[6]

Release[edit]

The Norway and Sweden broadcast commenced in April 2019.[7] In the US, the series was launched on December 18, 2019 via the Sundance Now streaming service.[8] In the United Kingdom, the series was acquired by BBC Four from Banijay Rights and commenced broadcast on 28 December 2019, with two episodes being shown back-to-back for five weeks.[9][10]

Reception[edit]

The Nordic press viewed the series favourably. Stavanger Aftenblad commented that it was "intricate and riveting", Jyllands-Posten called it “a sure winner” and Aftenposten praised its “nonstop momentum”.[11]

Writing in The Wall Street Journal, Dorothy Rabinowitz found the series "seamlessly woven" and "superbly layered".[2]

Writing in UK's The Guardian, Euan Ferguson described the series as "... the best Nord-noir ever. Since the last one. What did Scandinavian film-makers think they were ever doing, 80 years of existential angst and Death playing nihilist chess, before remembering: we have crime. Coal. Snow. Blood. Fire. Cheekbones. Let’s do that."[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ago, 11 Hours (2019-04-10). "Scripted Hot Pick: Wisting". TBI Vision. Archived from the original on 2019-04-10. Retrieved 2019-04-10.
  2. ^ a b Rabinowitz, Dorothy (12 December 2019). "'Wisting' Review: A Detective at Work". WSJ. Archived from the original on 22 December 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  3. ^ "Wisting: from book to screen". Dead Good. 2018-09-04. Archived from the original on 2019-04-10. Retrieved 2019-04-10.
  4. ^ a b Nikel, David (12 June 2018). "Wisting: The Next Nordic Noir Hit?". Life in Norway. Archived from the original on 22 December 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  5. ^ Keslassy, Elsa (31 January 2018). "Banijay Rights Acquires Nordic Crime Drama 'Wisting' (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Archived from the original on 22 December 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  6. ^ Furn, Daniel (9 December 2019). "When is Wisting on TV? What's it about?". Radio Times. Archived from the original on 22 December 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  7. ^ Horst, Jørn Lier (4 September 2018). "Wisting: from book to screen". Dead Good. Archived from the original on 22 December 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  8. ^ Kanter, Jake (2019-11-06). "Sundance Now Snaps Up Carrie-Anne Moss' Norwegian Detective Series 'Wisting' In Drama Deal With Banijay". Deadline. Retrieved 2020-10-03.
  9. ^ "BBC - BBC Four acquires Norwegian drama Wisting - Media Centre". www.bbc.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2019-10-15. Retrieved 2019-10-15.
  10. ^ https://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2019/bbc-four-wisting Archived 2019-10-15 at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ "Sundance Now Announces Jan 2020 Slate". Broadcasting & Cable. Archived from the original on 22 December 2019. Retrieved 22 December 2019.
  12. ^ Ferguson, Euan (January 5, 2020). "The week in TV: Dracula, Doctor Who, The Trial of Christine Keeler and more". Archived from the original on January 7, 2020. Retrieved January 7, 2020 – via www.theguardian.com.

External links[edit]