Wolstonbury Hill

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Wolstonbury Hill
Site of Special Scientific Interest
Trig Point, Wolstonbury Hill - geograph.org.uk - 1637866.jpg
Area of SearchWest Sussex
Grid referenceTQ 284 138[1]
InterestBiological
Area58.9 hectares (146 acres)[1]
Notification1986[1]
Location mapMagic Map

Wolstonbury Hill is a 58.9-hectare (146-acre) biological Site of Special Scientific Interest south-west of in West Sussex.[1][2] It is owned by the National Trust[3] and part of it is a Scheduled Monument.[4]

Description[edit]

Rising to a maximum height of 206 metres (676 ft), Wolstonbury projects into the Weald from the main ridge of the South Downs giving views of both the Downs and the Weald. Views across the Weald to the north are panoramic, to the east are the Clayton Windmills and Ditchling Beacon beyond. Hollingbury is prominent to the southeast. Looking west one can see Newtimber Hill, West Hill with Devils Dyke just beyond, further out Chanctonbury Ring is clearly visible.

Wolstonbury, owned and maintained by the National Trust[citation needed], is listed as a Scheduled Monument.

Access[edit]

No roads or car parks lie close to the summit so visitors have to ascend on foot or by mountain bike.

Geology[edit]

South of Hurstpierpoint ridge, the clay vale lies beneath the jutting profile and complex scarp and foot of Wolstonbury Hill.

The approach from the north is characterised by a network of linked or closely spaced woodlands (some parts ancient) centred on the designed landscape at Danny House.

Flora and fauna[edit]

Archeology and history[edit]

The remains at the site include a 2.2-hectare (5.4-acre) early Bronze Age enclosure now referred to as Wolstonbury C.[5] A possible inner enclosure known as Wolstonbury A appears to be older, due to it being overlain by C. Wolstonbury B is another possible enclosure sandwiched between A and C, its presence indicated by a survey conducted in 1994 by the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England. Excavations done by Bournemouth University in 1995 suggest that Wolstonbury A and B may be field lynchets.[6]

Skeletons were reportedly unearthed during flint digging operations begun in 1765. This digging continued until the mid-19th century, resulting in extensive damage to the site. Unknown quantities of Neolithic and early Bronze Age flintwork were discovered in a 1929 dig as well as "Romano-British" pottery, animal bones, and hammerstones.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Wolstonbury Hill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 24 May 2019.
  2. ^ "Map of Wolstonbury Hill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 24 May 2019.
  3. ^ "Wolstonbury Hill". National Trust. Retrieved 24 May 2019.
  4. ^ "Wolstonbury Camp: a Ram's Hill type enclosure on Wolstonbury Hill and associated later remains". Historic England. Retrieved 24 May 2019.
  5. ^ "Introduction to Wolstonbury". Bournemouth University. Retrieved 20 November 2017.
  6. ^ "Research by Bournemouth University - Wolstonbury Prehistoric Enclosures". Bournemouth University. Retrieved 20 November 2017.
  7. ^ "Summary of Archaeological History - Wolstonbury". Bournemouth University. Retrieved 20 November 2017.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 50°54′32″N 0°10′30″W / 50.909°N 0.175°W / 50.909; -0.175