Women's World Chess Championship 2020

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Defending champion Challenger
Fondation Neva Women's Grand Prix Geneva 11-05-2013 - Ju Wenjun during the press conference.jpg
Alexandra Goryachkina Satka 2018.jpg
 Ju Wenjun (CHN)  Aleksandra Goryachkina (RUS)
Born 31 January 1991
28 years old
Born 28 September 1998
21 years old
6 (2½) 6 (1½)
Winner of the
2018 World Championship
Winner of the
2019 Candidates Tournament
Rating: 2584
(Women's World No. 2)[1]
Rating: 2578
(Women's World No. 4)
2018 tournament 2022

The 2020 Women's World Chess Championship was a chess match for the Women's World Chess Championship title. It was contested by Ju Wenjun (world champion as winner of the 2018 knock-out championship) and her challenger, Aleksandra Goryachkina, the winner of a newly established Candidates Tournament that was held in 2019.[2]

The classical time-control portion of the match ended with a tied score of 6-6, after 3 victories of Ju, 3 victories of Goryachkina, and 6 draws. On 24 January, 4 games of rapid chess were used as a tie-breaker; and Ju Wenjun retained the title with 1 win and 3 draws.

The match was planned in two parts, one held in Shanghai (China) and one in Vladivostok (Russia), from 3 to 24 January 2020. It marked the return to a match only format for the title with qualifying Candidates Tournament, after new FIDE president Arkady Dvorkovich had expressed his dissatisfaction with the knock-out tournaments and resulting frequently changing world champions.

Candidates Tournament[edit]

The newly established candidates tournament started 29 May 2019 in Kazan, Russia. The format was an eight player double round-robin tournament.[3]

Three players qualified by virtue of reaching the semi-finals of the last championship.[4] One spot would have been reserved for Ju Wenjun as 2018 World Championship match winner. All remaining players came from the rating list, by taking the average of all twelve monthly ratings in 2018.[5] Aleksandra Goryachkina replaced Hou Yifan, who declined an invitation.[6]

Qualifiers[edit]

Place Player Points Women's
world no.
Elo
(May 2019)
Women's World champion
1 Russia Aleksandra Goryachkina 9.5 9 2522
2 Ukraine Anna Muzychuk 8 7 2539
3 China Tan Zhongyi 7 10 2513 2017
4 Russia Kateryna Lagno 7 4 2554
5 Ukraine Mariya Muzychuk 6.5 3 2563 2015
6 Georgia (country) Nana Dzagnidze 6.5 11 2510
7 Russia Alexandra Kosteniuk 6 6 2546 2008
8 Russia Valentina Gunina 5.5 13 2506

Goryachkina won with two rounds to spare.[7][8]

Crosstable[edit]

Leading player after each round in green.

No. Player Elo
(May 2019)[9]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Pts Tie-breaks Results by round Place
H2H Wins 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
1  Valentina Gunina (RUS) 2506 1 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 1 0 0 1 0 ½ ½ 2 2 3 8
2  Alexandra Kosteniuk (RUS) 2546 0 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 0 1 ½ ½ ½ 0 6 ½ 1 1 3 3 6 7
3  Aleksandra Goryachkina (RUS) 2522 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 3 4 5 8 9 1
4  Kateryna Lagno (RUS) 2554 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 7 ½ 1 1 2 4 5 6 6 7 3
5  Nana Dzagnidze (GEO) 2510 1 0 0 1 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 ½ 4 4 4 6 5
6  Mariya Muzychuk (UKR) 2563 ½ 0 1 0 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 3 5 6
7  Anna Muzychuk (UKR) 2539 1 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 8 ½ ½ ½ 1 3 5 8 2
8  Tan Zhongyi (CHN) 2513 0 1 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 1 ½ 7 ½ ½ 1 2 4 5 6 7 4

Championship match[edit]

As in 2018, the match was divided into two parts, hosted by the countries of the players. One stage was held in Shanghai, China and the other in Vladivostok, Russia.[10] In Shanghai the match was played in the InterContinental Shanghai Jing'An Hotel, in Vladivostok at the Far Eastern Federal University on Russky Island.[11] The format was increased to twelve games, the last championships consisted of only 10 scheduled games.

Schedule[edit]

Match started off in Shanghai and ended in Vladivostok.

Shanghai 4 Jan Opening ceremony
5–6 Jan Games 1–2
8–9 Jan Games 3–4
11–12 Jan Games 5–6
Vladivostok 15 Jan Opening ceremony
16–17 Jan Games 7–8
19–20 Jan Games 9–10
22–23 Jan Games 11–12
24 Jan Tiebreak games and closing ceremony

Results[edit]

Women's World Chess Championship 2020
Player Rating Standard Time Control Points Rapid Tie-Breaks Tie-Break
Points
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 R1 R2 R3 R4
 Ju Wenjun (China) 2584 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 ½ ½ 0 1 1 ½ 0 6 ½ ½ 1 ½
 Aleksandra Goryachkina (Russia) 2578 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 ½ ½ 1 0 0 ½ 1 6 ½ ½ 0 ½
Game Links Game # 1 on chessgames.com Game # 2 on chessgames.com Game # 3 on chessgames.com Game # 4 on chessgames.com Game # 5 on chessgames.com Game # 6 on chessgames.com Game # 7 on chessgames.com Game # 8 on chessgames.com Game # 9 on chessgames.com Game # 10 on chessgames.com Game # 11 on chessgames.com Game # 12 on chessgames.com Game Rapid #1 on chessgames.com Game Rapid #2 on chessgames.com Game Rapid #3 on chessgames.com Game Rapid #4 on chessgames.com

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://ratings.fide.com/top.phtml?list=women
  2. ^ http://www.fide.com/component/content/article/1-fide-news/11265-fide-on-the-womens-world-championship-cycle.html
  3. ^ https://www.fide.com/images/stories/NEWS_2018/FIDE_NEWS/Rules_for_the_FIDE_Womens_Candidates_Tournament_2019.pdf
  4. ^ https://en.chessbase.com/post/womens-world-ch-2018-round-4-3
  5. ^ https://de.chessbase.com/post/frauen-wm-der-modus-aendert-sich
  6. ^ https://www.fide.com/component/content/article/1-fide-news/11515-kazan-inaugurates-a-new-stage-in-womens-chess.html
  7. ^ https://en.chessbase.com/post/womens-candidates-2019-round-12
  8. ^ https://www.chess.com/news/view/goryachkina-wins-fide-women-candidates-anna-muzychuk-second
  9. ^ "Top 100 Women May 2019 – Archive". FIDE.
  10. ^ https://www.fide.com/component/content/article/1-fide-news/11810-fide-womens-grand-prix-kicks-off-in-skolkovo.html
  11. ^ https://de.chessbase.com/post/frauen-weltmeisterschaft-ju-wenjun-gegen-aleksandra-goryachkina

External links[edit]