Women's discus throw world record progression

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The first world record in the women's discus throw was recognized by the International Association of Athletics Federations in 1923. As of 2013, 55 world records have been ratified by the IAAF in the event.[1]

World record progression[edit]

Ratified
Not ratified
Ratified but later rescinded
Mark Athlete Location Date
24.90 m (81 ft 8 14 in)  Lilli Henoch (GER) Berlin 1 October 1922
26.62 m (87 ft 4 in)  Lilli Henoch (GER) Berlin 8 July 1923
27.39 m (89 ft 10 14 in)  Yvonne Tembouret (FRA) Paris 23 September 1923[1]
27.70 m (90 ft 10 12 in)  Lucie Petit (FRA) Paris 14 July 1924[1]
28.325 m (92 ft 11 in)  Lisette Petré (BEL) Brussels 21 July 1924[2][3]
30.225 m (99 ft 1 34 in)  Lucienne Velu (FRA) Paris 14 September 1924[1]
31.15 m (102 ft 2 14 in)  Maria Vidlaková (TCH) Prague 11 October 1925[1]
34.15 m (112 ft 14 in)  Halina Konopacka (POL) Warsaw 23 May 1926[1]
38.34 m (125 ft 9 14 in)  Milly Reuter (GER) Braunschweig, Germany 22 August 1926[1]
39.18 m (128 ft 6 12 in)  Halina Konopacka (POL) Warsaw 4 September 1927[1]
39.62 m (129 ft 11 34 in)  Halina Konopacka (POL) Amsterdam 31 July 1928[1]
40.345 m (132 ft 4 14 in)  Jadwiga Wajs (POL) Pabianice, Poland 15 May 1932[1]
40.39 m (132 ft 6 in)  Jadwiga Wajs (POL) Łódź, Poland 16 May 1932[1]
40.84 m (133 ft 11 34 in)  Grete Heublein (GER) Hagen, Germany 19 Jun 1932[1]
42.43 m (139 ft 2 14 in)  Jadwiga Wajs (POL) Łódź, Poland 19 June 1932[1]
43.08 m (141 ft 4 in)  Jadwiga Wajs (POL) Królewska Huta, Poland 15 July 1933[1]
43.795 m (143 ft 8 in)  Jadwiga Wajs (POL) London 11 August 1934[1]
44.34 m (145 ft 5 12 in)  Gisela Mauermayer (GER) Ulm, Germany 2 June 1935[1]
44.76 m (146 ft 10 in)  Gisela Mauermayer (GER) Nuremberg, Germany 4 June 1935[1]
45.53 m (149 ft 4 12 in)  Gisela Mauermayer (GER) Munich 23 June 1935[1]
46.10 m (151 ft 2 34 in)  Gisela Mauermayer (GER) Jena, Germany 29 June 1935[1]
47.12 m (154 ft 7 in)  Gisela Mauermayer (GER) Dresden, Germany 25 August 1935[1]
48.31 m (158 ft 5 34 in)  Gisela Mauermayer (GER) Berlin 11 July 1936[1]
53.25 m (174 ft 8 14 in)  Nina Dumbadze (URS) Moscow 8 August 1948[1]
53.37 m (175 ft 1 in)  Nina Dumbadze (URS) Gori, Soviet Union 27 May 1951[1]
53.61 m (175 ft 10 12 in)  Nina Romashkova (URS) Odessa, Soviet Union 9 August 1952[1]
57.04 m (187 ft 1 12 in)  Nina Dumbadze (URS) Tbilisi, Soviet Union 18 October 1952[1]
57.15 m (187 ft 6 in)  Tamara Press (URS) Rome 12 September 1960[1]
57.43 m (188 ft 5 in)  Tamara Press (URS) Moscow 15 July 1961[1]
58.06 m (190 ft 5 34 in)  Tamara Press (URS) Sofia, Bulgaria 1 September 1961[1]
58.98 m (193 ft 6 in)  Tamara Press (URS) London 20 September 1961[1]
59.29 m (194 ft 6 14 in)  Tamara Press (URS) Moscow 18 May 1963[1]
59.70 m (195 ft 10 14 in)  Tamara Press (URS) Moscow 11 August 1965[1]
61.26 m (200 ft 11 34 in)  Liesel Westermann (FRG) São Paulo, Brazil 5 November 1967[1]
61.64 m (202 ft 2 34 in)  Christine Spielberg (GDR) Regis-Breitingen, East Germany 26 May 1968[1]
62.54 m (205 ft 2 in)  Liesel Westermann (FRG) Werdohl, West Germany 24 July 1968[1]
62.70 m (205 ft 8 12 in)  Liesel Westermann (FRG) East Berlin, East Germany 18 June 1969[1]
63.96 m (209 ft 10 in)  Liesel Westermann (FRG) Hamburg, West Germany 27 September 1969[1]
64.22 m (210 ft 8 14 in)  Faina Melnik (URS) Helsinki 12 August 1971[1]
64.88 m (212 ft 10 14 in)  Faina Melnik (URS) Munich 4 September 1971[1]
65.42 m (214 ft 7 12 in)  Faina Melnik (URS) Moscow 31 May 1972[1][4]
65.48 m (214 ft 9 34 in)  Faina Melnik (URS) Augsburg, West Germany 24 June 1972[1][4]
66.76 m (219 ft 14 in)  Faina Melnik (URS) Moscow 4 August 1972[1][4]
67.32 m (220 ft 10 14 in)  Argentina Menis (ROU) Constanța, Romania 23 September 1972[1][4]
67.44 m (221 ft 3 in)  Faina Melnik (URS) Riga, Soviet Union 25 May 1973[1][4]
67.58 m (221 ft 8 12 in)  Faina Melnik (URS) Moscow 10 July 1973[1][4]
69.48 m (227 ft 11 14 in)  Faina Melnik (URS) Edinburgh 7 September 1973[1][4]
69.90 m (229 ft 3 34 in)  Faina Melnik (URS) Prague 27 May 1974[1][4]
70.20 m (230 ft 3 34 in)  Faina Melnik (URS) Zurich 20 August 1975[1][4]
70.50 m (231 ft 3 12 in)  Faina Melnik (URS) Sochi, Soviet Union 24 April 1976[1][4]
70.72 m (232 ft 14 in)  Evelin Jahl (GDR) Dresden, East Germany 12 August 1978[1][4]
71.50 m (234 ft 6 34 in)  Evelin Jahl (GDR) Potsdam, East Germany 10 May 1980[1][4]
71.80 m (235 ft 6 34 in)  Mariya Petkova (BUL) Sofia, Bulgaria 13 July 1980[1][4]
73.26 m (240 ft 4 14 in)  Galina Savinkova (URS) Leselidze, Soviet Union 22 May 1983[1][4]
73.36 m (240 ft 8 in)  Irina Meszynski (GDR) Prague 17 August 1984[1][4]
74.56 m (244 ft 7 14 in)  Zdeňka Šilhavá (TCH) Nitra, Czechoslovakia 26 August 1984[1][4]
76.80 m (251 ft 11 12 in)  Gabriele Reinsch (GDR) Neubrandenburg, East Germany 9 July 1988[1][4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc "13th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook, Berlin 2011". Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2011. pp. 647–48. Archived from the original (pdf) on November 23, 2012. Retrieved 8 March 2013.
  2. ^ (in Dutch) Nieuw wereldrecord voor dames, Utrechts Nieuwsblad, 23 July 1924
  3. ^ (in French) Les Sports - en vitesse, Le radical, 23 July 1924
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Larsson, Peter (February 28, 2013). "All-time women's best discus throw". Track and Field all-time Performances Homepage. Peter Larsson. Archived from the original on March 8, 2013. Retrieved March 8, 2013.