Women's 3000 metres world record progression

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The following table shows the world record progression in the Women's 3,000 metres. The first record officially recognised by the IAAF was set on 6 July 1974 by Lyudmila Bragina from the Soviet Union.

As of June 21, 2009, the IAAF has ratified nine world records in the event.[1]

Pre-IAAF, to 1974[edit]

Time Athlete Date Place
14:44.4  Ana Cicanei (ROM) 1927
10:56.0  Phyllis Perkins (GBR) 1954-05-22 London, United Kingdom
10:55.2  Phyllis Perkins (GBR) 1955-06-25 London, United Kingdom
10:25.8  Leila Buckland (GBR) 1955-08-27 London, United Kingdom
10:16.2  June Bridgland (GBR) 1956-08-25 London, United Kingdom
10:16.0  Phyllis Perkins (GBR) 1956-10-27 London, United Kingdom
9:44.0  Roberta Picco (CAN) 1966-07-23 Don Mills, Canada
9:42.8  Paola Pigni (ITA) 1969-05-11 Formia, Italy
9:38.0  Paola Pigni (ITA) 1969-09-02 Milan, Italy
9:26.9  Doris Brown (USA) 1971-07-10 Bakersfield, United States
9:23.4  Joyce Smith (GBR) 1971-07-16 London, United Kingdom
9:09.2  Paola Pigni (ITA) 1972-05-11 Formia, Italy
8:53.0  Lyudmila Bragina (URS) 1972-08-12 Moscow, Soviet Union

IAAF era, from 1974[edit]

Time Athlete Date Place
8:52.8*  Lyudmila Bragina (URS) 1974-07-06[1] Durham, United States
8:46.6  Grete Andersen-Waitz (NOR) 1975-06-24[1] Oslo, Norway
8:45.4  Grete Waitz (NOR) 1976-06-21[1] Oslo, Norway
8:27.2*  Lyudmila Bragina (URS) 1976-08-07[1] College Park, Australia
8:26.78  Svetlana Ulmasova (URS) 1982-07-25[1] Kiev, Soviet Union
8:22.62  Tatyana Kazankina (URS) 1984-08-26[1] Leningrad, Soviet Union
8:22.06  Zhang Linli (CHN) 1993-09-12[1] Beijing, PR China
8:12.19  Wang Junxia (CHN) 1993-09-12[1] Beijing, PR China
8:06.11  Wang Junxia (CHN) 1993-09-13[1] Beijing, PR China

* - indicates ratified time. Auto times for Bragina's 8:52.8 and 8:27.2 were 8:52.74 and 8:27.12 respectively.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "12th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Berlin 2009." (PDF). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2009. pp. Pages 546, 642. Archived from the original (pdf) on June 29, 2011. Retrieved August 4, 2009.