Women's shot put world record progression

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The first world record in the women's shot put was recognised by the Fédération Sportive Féminine Internationale (FSFI) in 1924. The FSFI was absorbed by the International Association of Athletics Federations in 1936. These women's distances were achieved with an 4 kilograms (8.8 lb) shot put.

As of June 21, 2009, the IAAF (and the FSFI before it) have ratified 50 world records in the event.[1]

World record progression[edit]

Mark Athlete Date Location
10.15 m  Violette Gouraud-Morris (FRA) 14 July 1924 Paris, France[1]
10.84 m  Ruth Lange (GER) 28 May 1927 Prague, Czechoslovakia[1]
11.32 m  Ruth Lange (GER) 6 August 1927 Breslau, Germany[1]
11.52 m  Ruth Lange (GER) 3 June 1928 Berlin, Germany[1]
11.96 m  Grete Heublein (GER) 15 July 1928 Berlin, Germany[1]
12.85 m  Grete Heublein (GER) 21 July 1929 Frankfurt am Main, Germany[1]
12.88 m  Grete Heublein (GER) 28 June 1931 Paris, France[1]
13.70 m  Grete Heublein (GER) 16 August 1931 Bielefeld, Germany[1]
14.38 m  Gisela Mauermayer (GER) 15 July 1934 Warsaw, Poland[1]
14.59 m  Tatyana Sevryukova (URS) 4 August 1948 Moscow, Soviet Union[1]
14.86 m  Klavdia Tochonova (URS) 30 October 1949 Tbilisi, Soviet Union[1]
15.02 m  Anna Andreeva (URS) 9 November 1950 Ploiești, Romania[1]
15.28 m  Galina Zybina (URS) 26 July 1952 Helsinki, Finland[1]
15.37 m  Galina Zybina (URS) 20 September 1952 Frunze, Soviet Union[1]
15.42 m  Galina Zybina (URS) 1 October 1952 Frunze, Soviet Union[1]
16.20 m  Galina Zybina (URS) 9 October 1953 Malmö, Sweden[1]
16.28 m  Galina Zybina (URS) 14 September 1954 Kiev, Soviet Union[1]
16.28 m  Galina Zybina (URS) 5 September 1955 Leningrad, Soviet Union[1]
16.67 m  Galina Zybina (URS) 15 November 1955 Tbilisi, Soviet Union[1]
16.76 m  Galina Zybina (URS) 13 October 1956 Tashkent, Soviet Union[1]
17.25 m  Tamara Press (URS) 26 April 1959 Nalchik, Soviet Union[1]
17.42 m  Tamara Press (URS) 16 July 1960 Moscow, Soviet Union[1]
17.78 m  Tamara Press (URS) 13 August 1960 Moscow, Soviet Union[1]
18.55 m  Tamara Press (URS) 10 June 1962 Leipzig, East Germany[1]
18.55 m  Tamara Press (URS) 12 September 1962 Beograd, Yugoslavia[1]
18.59 m  Tamara Press (URS) 19 September 1965 Kassel, West Germany[1]
18.67 m  Nadezhda Chizhova (URS) 28 April 1968 Sochi, Soviet Union[1]
18.87 m  Margitta Gummel (GDR) 22 September 1968 Frankfurt (Oder), East Germany[1]
19.07 m  Margitta Gummel (GER) 20 October 1968 Mexico City, Mexico[1]
19.61 m  Margitta Gummel (GER) 20 October 1968 Mexico City, Mexico[1]
19.72 m  Nadezhda Chizhova (URS) 30 May 1969 Moscow, Soviet Union[1]
20.09 m  Nadezhda Chizhova (URS) 13 July 1969 Chorzów, Poland[1]
20.10 m  Margitta Gummel (GDR) 11 September 1969 East Berlin, East Germany[1]
20.10 m  Nadezhda Chizhova (URS) 16 September 1969 Athens, Greece[1]
20.43 m  Nadezhda Chizhova (URS) 16 September 1969 Athens, Greece[1]
20.43 m  Nadezhda Chizhova (URS) 29 August 1971 Moscow, Soviet Union[1]
20.63 m  Nadezhda Chizhova (URS) 19 May 1972 Sochi, Soviet Union[1]
21.03 m  Nadezhda Chizhova (URS) 7 September 1972 Munich, West Germany[1]
21.20 m  Nadezhda Chizhova (URS) 28 August 1973 Lvov, Soviet Union[1]
21.60 m  Marianne Adam (GDR) 6 August 1975 East Berlin, East Germany[1]
21.67 m  Marianne Adam (GDR) 30 May 1976 Karl-Marx-Stadt, East Germany[1]
21.87 m  Ivanka Khristova (BUL) 3 July 1976 Belmeken, Bulgaria[1]
21.89 m  Ivanka Khristova (BUL) 4 July 1976 Belmeken, Bulgaria[1]
21.99 m  Helena Fibingerová (TCH) 26 September 1976 Opava, Czechoslovakia[1]
22.32 m  Helena Fibingerová (TCH) 20 August 1977 Nitra, Czechoslovakia[1]
22.36 m  Ilona Slupianek (GDR) 2 May 1980 Celje, Yugoslavia[1]
22.45 m  Ilona Slupianek (GDR) 11 May 1980 Potsdam, East Germany[1]
22.53 m  Natalya Lisovskaya (URS) 27 May 1984 Sochi, Soviet Union[1]
22.60 m  Natalya Lisovskaya (URS) 7 June 1987 Moscow, Soviet Union[1]
22.63 m  Natalya Lisovskaya (URS) 7 June 1987 Moscow, Soviet Union[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay "12th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Berlin 2009." (PDF). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2009. pp. Pages 546, 646–7. Archived from the original (pdf) on June 29, 2011. Retrieved August 5, 2009.