Women in Burundi

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Batwa women with traditional pots. In the Commune of Kiganda, Muramvya Province in July 2007.

Following the recommendations of a Universal Periodic Review (UPR) in 2008, Burundi ratified the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance (ICCPED),[1] Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women[2] (OP-CEDAW), and the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment[3] (OPCAT).

However, Women in Burundi are vastly underrepresented at all levels of decision making in the government.[4]

The phenomenon of sexual violence, particularly against women and children, is common in the country.[4] The Initiative for Peacebuilding noted in a 2010 study on gender issues in Burundi that there is a strong correlation between areas of intense military activity and high incidences of sexual violence.[5]

Burundian Civil War[edit]

Amnesty International claims rape, in addition to physical mutilation, was used during the Burundian Civil War as 'a strategy of war'.[6] In 2004 the Hutu rebel group, Forces of National Liberation (FNL), claimed responsibility for killing 160 Congolese Tutsi refugees in a United Nations camp at Gatumba near the Congo border in Burundi. The attack was strongly condemned by the U.N. Security Council, which issued a statement of outrage at the fact that "most of the victims were women, children and babies who were shot dead and burned in their shelters."[7]

Burundi women's national football team[edit]

Women's football is now [a] big deal. The standard that we have attained in Africa is good enough. Soon, an African team will challenge seriously for the World Cup. But we need far more support from governments and big business.

Lydia Nsekera, president of the Fédération de Football du Burundi[8]

The Fédération de Football du Burundi, the country's national association, created a woman's football programme in 2000.[9][10][11] By 2006, there were just 455 registered women players, and the absence of a thriving women's game has been an obstacle for the national team.[12] Lydia Nsekera is the head of the national football association.[13]

Outside the national federation, the Commission nationale du football féminin was established by the 1990s, and a league and women's teams were organised in the same period in Bujumbura.[14][15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ United Nations. "United Nations Treaty Collection: Chapter IV: Human Rights: 16. International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance. New York, 20 December 2006". Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  2. ^ United Nations. "United Nations Treaty Collection: Chapter IV: Human Rights: 8. Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. New York, 18 December 1979". Archived from the original on 23 August 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  3. ^ United Nations. "United Nations Treaty Collection: Chapter IV: Human Rights: 9. Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment. New York, 10 December 1984". Archived from the original on 8 November 2010. Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  4. ^ a b http://lib.ohchr.org/HRBodies/UPR/Documents/Session3/BI/A_HRC_WG6_3_BDI_1_Burundi_E.pdf
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ [2]
  7. ^ "U.N. Demands Justice After Massacre of 150 Refugees in Burundi". The New York Times. 2004-08-16. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  8. ^ Olajire, Ademola (November 5, 2006). "Vanguard (Nigeria) - AAGM: Wesley Canvasses Greater Support for Women Football". Vanguard. Lagos, Nigeria. Retrieved 16 April 2012. 
  9. ^ "Burundi: Fixtures and Results". FIFA. 2012. Retrieved 28 June 2012. 
  10. ^ "Goal! Football: Burundi" (PDF). FIFA. 21 April 2009. p. 4. Retrieved 16 April 2012. 
  11. ^ Tom Dunmore (16 September 2011). Historical Dictionary of Soccer. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0-8108-7188-5. Retrieved 13 April 2012. 
  12. ^ FIFA (2006). "Women's Football Today" (PDF): 40. Retrieved 17 April 2012. 
  13. ^ Gabriel Kuhn (24 February 2011). Soccer Vs. the State: Tackling Football and Radical Politics. PM Press. p. 34. ISBN 978-1-60486-053-5. Retrieved 13 April 2012. 
  14. ^ "Burundi - Lydia Nsekera, la "Madame Thatcher du football" à la Fifa" (in French). Slate Afrique. 31 May 2012. Retrieved 28 June 2012. Elle a beaucoup œuvré pour inciter les femmes du Burundi à pratiquer ce sport. Dans les années 1990, en tant que présidente de la Commission nationale du football féminin, elle a mis en place des équipes féminines à Bujumbara et a créé un championnat de football uniquement dédié aux femmes. 
  15. ^ "Fifa : Lydia Nsekera, première dame du foot mondial" (in French). Jeune Afrique. 30 May 2012. Retrieved 28 June 2012. Elle a assouvi sa passion par procuration et contribué largement à changer les choses en créant des équipes féminines à Bujumbura, la capitale de cette ancienne colonie belge. À la fin des années 1990, la Fifa, pour encourager le développement du football au Burundi, se tourne naturellement vers Lydia Nsekera.