Women in Film and Television International

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Women In Film & Television International (WIFTI) is a global network of non-profit membership chapters. Established in 1997, WIFTI is dedicated to advancing professional development and achievement for women working in all areas of film, video, and other screen-based media.[1]

Aims[edit]

  • Enhance the international visibility of women in the entertainment industry.
  • Facilitate and encourage communication and cooperation internationally.
  • Develop bold international projects and initiatives.
  • Stimulate professional development and global networking opportunities for women.
  • Promote and support chapter development.
  • Celebrate the achievements of women in all areas of the industry.
  • Encourage diverse and positive representation of women in screen-based media worldwide.[citation needed]

History[edit]

Women in Film Los Angeles was founded in 1973 by Tichi Wilkerson Kassel. After several Women in Film organizations were established in a variety of cities around the globe, Women in Film and Television International WIFTI was organized in the mid-1990s.[2]

1973–1997[edit]

Women in Film and Television International (WIFTI) is a "global network comprised of over forty Women In Film chapters worldwide with over 10,000 members, dedicated to advancing professional development and achievement for women working in all areas of film, video and digital media."[3] The organization was founded in 1973 in Los Angeles by Tichi Wilkerson Kassel and grew quickly worldwide, hosting their first Women in Film and Television International World Summit in New York City in September 1997.[4]


WIFTI chapters[edit]

Main sources:[5][6]
Region Chapter Yr.fo. Yr.ch President Web
Africa WIFT South Africa 2005
Asia & India WIFT Mumbai
Australia WIFT NSW 1982 [1]
WIFT NZ 1994 [3a]
Europe WIFT Finland 2014 Elina Knihtilä [2]
WFTV United Kingdom 1989 1990 Liz Tucker [2a]
WIFT Ireland
WIFT Germany [3]
WIF France
WIF Sweden 2003 2005 [4]
WIFT Greece 1973 Olympia Mytilinaiou [5]
WIF Czech Republic [6]
South America WIFT Brazil [7]
Latin American & Caribbean Dominican Republic [8]
WIFT (Mexico) 2002 [9]
Canada WIFT Alberta Susan Feddema-Leonard [10]
WIFT Atlantic - 2009 Kimberlee McTaggart [11]
WIFT Montreal Brigitte Monneau [12]
WIFTV Vancouver 1989 Sarah Kalil (2017-19) [13]
United States WIFT Atlanta LaRonda Sutton [14]
BAWIFT San Francisco 2001 2003 Soumyaa Kapil Behrens [15]
WIF Chicago Carrie Hunter [16]
WIF Dallas 1984 Alicia Pascual [17]
KCWIFT (Kansas City) Laurie Crawford (2017 19) [18]
WIF Los Angeles 1977 1997 [1a]
MNWIFT (Minnesota) 2012? Joanne Liebeler (2016-17) [19]
WIFT Nashville Lynda Evjen [20]
WIFV New England 1981 2005? [21]
NMWIF Santa Fe Christine McHugh [22]
NYWIFT New York 1977 Simone Pero (2017-18) [23]
WIF & Media Pittsburgh 2007 Roxana Gilani [24]
WIF-PDX Portland Lisa Miyamoto [25]
WIF Seattle Lisa B. Hammond [26]
WIFV Washington D.C. 1979 Carletta S Hurt [1b]
Women in Film Utah 2010 Susan McEvoy (2017- ) [27]
WIFM Tennessee Roxanna 'Roxie" Green [28]
WIFT Palm Springs 2001 2010 [29]
WIFT Florida Nancy McBride [30]
WIFT Louisiana Carol Bidault de l'Isle [31]
WIFT Maryland
WIFT Houston Trish Rigdon [32]

Notes

1. 1a WIF Los Angeles — Official Website: WomenInFilm.org
— see also, Women in Film Crystal + Lucy Awards
... 1b WIFV Washington D.C. — Women in Film & Video-DC Women of Vision Awards
— The founders include Ginny Durrin, Judy Herbert, Sharon Ferguson, Christine Brim, Jan Hatcher, Norma Davidoff, Pat McMurray, Catherine Anderson, Lauren Versel, Michal Carr, Elise Reeder, and Polly Krieger.[7]
2. 2a WFTV United Kingdom — Official Website: |WFTV UK
— The founders include Lynda La Plante, Norma Heyman, Jenne Casarroto, Dawn French, Joan Collins and Janet Street-Porter.[8]
3. 3a WIFT NZ — Official Website: WIFT NZ
History of WIFT in NZ, researched and written by Helen Martin, traces the history of Women in Film and Television, from the establishment of WIF in Los Angeles in 1973, through the founding of WIFT Wellington in 1994, to the 10th anniversary of WIFT Auckland in 2005. [9]

Programs[edit]

  • Women in Film Foundation's Film Finishing Fund supports films by, for or about women[10]. — since 2004
  • There are 22 affiliate organizations of WIFTI in the United States.[11] The Washington D.C. affiliate, Women in Film & Video, has presented Women of Vision awards annually since 1994 to honor creative and technical achievements of women in media.[12][13] Women in Film & Video has held a WIFV annual film festival.[14]
  • Women In Film & Television Short Film Showcase, or WIFTI Short-Case, is a demonstration of WIFTI members' creativity, vision, and artistry[15]. — since 2004
  • WIFTI Summits have been held bi-annually[16][17]. — since 1997

See also[edit]

Related organizations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Women in Film and Television International - About Us". WIFTI. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  2. ^ "About WIFTI Chapters". www.wiftichapters.org. Retrieved 2015-08-15.
  3. ^ "Mission". Women in Film and Television International. Women in Film and Television International. Retrieved 27 May 2013.
  4. ^ "Overview". Women in Film and Television International. Women in Film and Television International. Retrieved 30 May 2013.
  5. ^ "Chapters". Women in Film and Television International. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  6. ^ "Other Chapters". Women In Film Los Angeles. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  7. ^ "History". WIFV Washington D.C. Retrieved May 21, 2018. In 1979, Ginny Durrin sent a letter to women she knew working in media inviting them to a meeting at her house. [...] Among the women involved in the first year were: Ginny Durrin, Judy Herbert, Sharon Ferguson, Christine Brim, Jan Hatcher, Norma Davidoff, Pat McMurray, Catherine Anderson, Lauren Versel, Michal Carr, Elise Reeder, and Polly Krieger.
  8. ^ "History". Women in Film & TV (UK). Retrieved May 21, 2018. In 1989, a group of women came together for the first WFTV (UK) meeting. A mix of executives, creatives and performers, they included Lynda La Plante, Norma Heyman, Jenne Casarroto, Dawn French, Joan Collins and Janet Street-Porter. [...] They resolved to take positive action and follow in the footsteps of organisations in Los Angeles and New York City established in the '70s to support women working in the film and TV industries. [...] In 1990, the first Women in Film awards ceremony was held to recognise the achievements of some of the most successful women the industry could boast. Twenty-five years on, the WFTV Awards is the largest annual celebration of women working in film, TV and digital media in the UK.
  9. ^ Helen, Martin. "FROM THE VAULT - A History of Women in Film and Television in New Zealand" (PDF). WIFT NZ. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  10. ^ Ramos, Dino-Ray (January 8, 2018). "Women In Film LA Unveils 32nd Annual Film Finishing Fund Recipients". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved May 22, 2018.
  11. ^ BOARD,TREASURER, CAROL SAVOIE-WBST ADMIN WIFTI. "Women In Film And Television International". www.wiftichapters.org. Retrieved 2015-08-15.
  12. ^ Annual Women of Vision Awards program, Oct. 6, 2011, Rosslyn, Virginia
  13. ^ Women of Vision Awards at wifv.org
  14. ^ Hail, Carla (March 2, 1987). "She Is a Camera". Washington Post.
  15. ^ "Short Film Showcase". WIFTI. 2018. Retrieved May 22, 2018.
  16. ^ "Past Events". WIFTI. Retrieved May 22, 2018.
  17. ^ "WIFTI Summits". WIFTIchapters.org. Retrieved May 22, 2018.

External links[edit]