WonderCon

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WonderCon
WonderCon.svg

WonderCon 2010 - Floor 013.jpg
WonderCon 2010 main exhibit hall
StatusActive
GenreMulti-genre
Venue1987–2002: Oakland Convention Center
2003–2011: Moscone Center
2012–2015 Anaheim Convention Center
2016: Los Angeles Convention Center
2017– : Anaheim Convention Center
Location(s)California
CountryUnited States
InauguratedMay 2, 1987; 31 years ago (1987-05-02) (as Wonderful World of Comics Convention)
Most recentPresent
Attendance60,000 (2016)[1]
Organized byComic-Con International
Filing statusNonprofit
Websitecomic-con.org/wca

WonderCon is an annual comic book, science fiction, and film convention held in the San Francisco Bay Area (1987–2011), then - under the name WonderCon Anaheim - in Anaheim, California (2012–2015, 2017–), and WonderCon Los Angeles in 2016.[2] The convention returned to the Anaheim Convention Center in 2017 after a one-year stint in Los Angeles.

The convention was conceived by retailer John Barrett (a founder of the retail chain Comics and Comix) and originally held in the Oakland Convention Center. In 2003, it moved to San Francisco's Moscone Center.[3][not in citation given] The show's original name was the Wonderful World of Comics Convention.

History[edit]

Retailer Joe Field (of Flying Colors Comics and Other Cool Stuff) and his partner Mike Friedrich owned and operated the convention for fifteen years. In 2001, they brokered a deal with the management team that runs the San Diego Comic-Con International to make it part of the Comic-Con International convention family.[4] This gave the San Francisco show a wider audience and has made it a venue for previews and early screenings of major motion pictures, in particular ones based on comic books. These have included Spider-Man 2 in 2004, Batman Begins and Fantastic Four in 2005, Superman Returns in 2006, 300 in 2007, Watchmen in 2009, and Kick-Ass in 2010. All of these events featured the stars of the films fielding questions from the audience.

WonderCon had 34,000 attendees in 2009,[5] 39,000 in 2010, and 49,500 in 2011.[6]

The show left the Bay Area after the 2011 con, because San Francisco's Moscone Center was being remodeled. The convention moved to Anaheim in 2012, and was rebranded WonderCon Anaheim.[2] When the move to Anaheim was first announced, Comic-Con International said they would be returning to San Francisco after the Moscone Center renovations were complete; however, the convention ultimately stayed in Southern California. In 2016, a new convention started in the Bay Area, called the Silicon Valley Comic Con.[7]

WonderCon relocated from Anaheim to Los Angeles in 2016, and is now called WonderCon Los Angeles and was held March 25-27, 2016 at the Los Angeles Convention Center.[8] The 2017 edition of the convention returned to Anaheim and was held March 31-April 2, 2017.[9]

The WonderCon logo was designed by Richard Bruning and Tim Zach.

Event history[edit]

Dates Location Guests
May 2-3, 1987 Oakland Convention Center
Oakland, CA
[10]
April 23-24, 1988 Oakland Convention Center
Oakland, CA
[11]
April 28-30, 1989 Oakland Convention Center
Oakland, CA
[12]
May 11-13, 1990 Oakland Convention Center
Oakland, CA
Dan Brereton, Erik Larsen, Jim Lee, Rob Liefeld, Ron Lim, Ken Macklin, Chris Marrinan, Trina Robbins, Jim Valentino, Tim Vigil, Marv Wolfman [13]
April 24-26, 1992 Oakland Convention Center
Oakland, CA
[14]
April 22-24, 1994 Oakland Convention Center
Oakland, CA
[15]
April 26-28, 1996 Oakland Convention Center
Oakland, CA
[16]
April 1-3, 2001 Oakland Convention Center
Oakland, CA
[17]
April 19-21, 2002 Oakland Convention Center
Oakland, CA
[18]
April 25-27, 2003 Moscone Center
San Francisco, CA
[19]
April 30 - May 2, 2004 Moscone Center
San Francisco, CA
[20]
February 18-20, 2005 Moscone Center North
San Francisco, CA
[21]
February 10-12, 2006 Moscone Center West
San Francisco, CA
[22]
March 2-4, 2007 Moscone Center South
San Francisco, CA
[23]
February 22-24, 2008 Moscone Center South
San Francisco, CA
[24]
February 27 - March 1, 2009 Moscone Center South
San Francisco, CA
[25]
April 2-4, 2010 Moscone Center South
San Francisco, CA
Peter S. Beagle, Geoff Johns, Adam Kubert, Jimmy Palmiotti, Tim Powers, Kevin Smith, Judd Winick [26]
April 1-3, 2011 Moscone Center South
San Francisco, CA
Sergio Aragonés, Robert Kirkman, Francis Manapul, Joe Quesada, Frank Quitely, Amy Reeder, Bill Sienkiewicz, Judd Winick, Marv Wolfman [27]
March 16-18, 2012 Anaheim Convention Center
Anaheim, CA
[28]
March 29-31, 2013 Anaheim Convention Center
Anaheim, CA
[29]
April 18-20, 2014 Anaheim Convention Center
Anaheim, CA
Tony Daniel, Jim Lee, Mark Waid [30]
April 3-5, 2015 Anaheim Convention Center
Anaheim, CA
Neal Adams, Becky Cloonan, Sam de la Rosa, Steve Epting, Greg Horn, Phil Noto, Greg Weisman [31]
March 25-27, 2016 Los Angeles Convention Center
Los Angeles, CA
Brian Michael Bendis, Amber Benson, Jason Faunt, Lou Ferrigno, Christopher Khayman Lee, Jim Lee, Humberto Ramos, John Romita, Jr., Bill Sienkiewicz, David Sobolov [32]
March 31 - April 2, 2017 Anaheim Convention Center
Anaheim, CA
Sergio Aragonés, Kevin Eastman, Chad Hardin, Phil Jimenez, Jim Lee, Mark Waid [33]
March 23-25, 2018 Anaheim Convention Center
Anaheim, CA
Sergio Aragonés, Larry Hama, Faith Erin Hicks, Jim Lee, Patrick Rothfuss, Gail Simone, Mark Waid [34]
March 29-31, 2019 Anaheim Convention Center
Anaheim, CA
[35]

Features and events[edit]

The exterior of WonderCon at the Anaheim Convention Center

While the main attraction of WonderCon has always been various retailers selling back issues of comic books and action figures, the exhibitor list has grown to include retailers of specialty DVDs. There is also an "Artists Alley" featuring mainly comic book artists selling artwork, signing books, and doing sketches; and mainstream celebrities signing autographed pictures.

WonderCon hosted the Harvey Award ceremonies from 1997–1999.[36] Since 2007, academicians and comic industry professionals have held the Comics Arts Conference in conjunction with WonderCon.

In addition, WonderCon features an event called "Trailer Park," where trailers for upcoming films are shown.

The WonderCon masquerade competition usually takes place on Saturday after the convention closes. Awards are given to those with the most creative performances, though anyone can participate.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ MacDonald, Heidi. "WonderCon Hosts DC's Rebirth Debut in Los Angeles". PublishersWeekly.com. Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 3 August 2016.
  2. ^ a b "WonderCon Moves To Anaheim With Costumed Avengers In Tow," CBS 2 San Francisco (March 17, 2012).
  3. ^ "WonderCon". Comic-Con International. Archived from the original on December 8, 2012. Retrieved November 19, 2012.
  4. ^ Albert, Aaron. "Wondercon Profile", About.com.
  5. ^ Boucher, Geoff. "WonderCon shows the comic convention circuit's power is growing". Los Angeles Times. April 6, 2010
  6. ^ MacDonald, Heidi. "WonderCon Brings Fans, Publishers, Excitement to San Francisco", Publishers Weekly. April 4, 2011
  7. ^ Minotti, Mike (April 17, 2015). "Steve Wozniak and Stan Lee are bringing Silicon Valley its own comic con". VentureBeat. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved 2016-03-30.
  8. ^ Variety Staff (April 6, 2015). "WonderCon Moving to Los Angeles for 2016 Convention". Variety. Archived from the original on March 17, 2016. Retrieved 2016-03-30.
  9. ^ Woerner, Meredith (March 25, 2016). "WonderCon will go back to Anaheim in 2017, but L.A. wants it back for 2019". The Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 2016-03-30. Retrieved 2016-03-30.
  10. ^ "Wonderful World of Comics Convention 1987 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  11. ^ "Wonderful World of Comics Convention 1988 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  12. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 1989 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  13. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 1990 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  14. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 1992 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  15. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 1994 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  16. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 1996 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  17. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2001 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  18. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2002 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  19. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2003 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  20. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2004 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  21. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2005 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  22. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2006 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  23. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2007 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  24. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2008 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  25. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2009 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  26. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2010 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  27. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2011 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  28. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2012 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  29. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2013 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  30. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2014 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  31. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2015 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  32. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2016 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  33. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2017 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  34. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2018 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  35. ^ "Wonderful WonderCon 2019 Information". Fancons. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  36. ^ Press release. "2003 Harvey Awards Banquet Cancelled, Awards Unaffected, Comic Book Resources (January 24, 2003).

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 37°48′00″N 122°24′00″W / 37.8000°N 122.4000°W / 37.8000; -122.4000