Wonder Valley, California

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Wonder Valley, California
Unincorporated Community
Remnants of a small recreational cabin in Wonder Valley, CA
Remnants of a small recreational cabin in Wonder Valley, CA
Wonder Valley, California is located in California
Wonder Valley, California
Wonder Valley, California
Location within the state of California
Coordinates: 34°9′4″N 115°55′53″W / 34.15111°N 115.93139°W / 34.15111; -115.93139Coordinates: 34°9′4″N 115°55′53″W / 34.15111°N 115.93139°W / 34.15111; -115.93139
Country United States
State California
County San Bernardino
Area
 • Total 150 sq mi (380 km2)
 • Land 150 sq mi (380 km2)
Elevation 1,500 ft (500 m)
Population (2013)
 • Total 615
 • Density 4.2/sq mi (1.6/km2)
Time zone Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes 92277
Area codes 442/760

Wonder Valley is a sparsely populated unincorporated community in the Morongo Basin of Southern California's High Desert region, straddling Amboy Road and State Route 62 in San Bernardino County, California, United States, approximately 10 miles (16 km) east of the city of Twentynine Palms.

Geography and climate[edit]

Wonder Valley occupies the gently sloping basin between the Sheep Hole Mountains and Bullion Mountains to the north and the Pinto Mountains to the south. Elevations in Wonder Valley range from 1,800 feet (550 m) in the valley's western reaches to 1,200 feet (370 m) near the eastern frontier of population within the valley. The nearest incorporated community is the city of Twentynine Palms, which lies about 10 miles (16 km) to the west. State Route 62 and Amboy Road both pass through Wonder Valley; most other roads in the community are unpaved.

Due to its low elevation relative to other communities of the Morongo Basin, Wonder Valley lies near the intersection of the higher-elevation Mojave Desert and the lower-elevation Colorado Desert. Wonder Valley's subtropical desert climate is characterized by very hot summers and cool winters with considerable diurnal temperature variation throughout the year. Moisture from the North American Monsoon contributes to summer precipitation and thunderstorm activity, and most non-monsoonal precipitation can be attributed to winter Pacific storms.

Wonder Valley is approximately 15 miles (24 km) northeast of the east entrance to Joshua Tree National Park.

Infrastructure[edit]

Local[edit]

Wonder Valley is unincorporated and is under the jurisdiction of San Bernardino County. Residents of Wonder Valley are served by San Bernardino County's County Service Area (CSA) 70M, a special services district with taxing authority that provides residents with fire protection, park, and road maintenance services.[1] Many residents of Wonder Valley live on large parcels of land consisting of 5 acres (2 ha), a result of the community's growth after the enactment of the Small Tract Act of 1938.

State and federal representation[edit]

In the California State Legislature, Wonder Valley is in the 16th Senate District, represented by Republican Jean Fuller, and in the 42nd Assembly District, represented by Republican Chad Mayes.[2]

In the United States House of Representatives, Wonder Valley is in California's 8th congressional district, represented by Republican Paul Cook.[3]

History[edit]

Wonder Valley was not substantively populated until the United States Congress approved the Small Tract Act (STA) of 1938, a homesteading law that facilitated the leasing and public-to-private transfer of ownership of parcels of up to five acres to United States citizens willing to improve the land by developing a residence, business, or recreational structure.[4]

Typical “Jackrabbit” homestead cabin remains in Wonder Valley.

Thousands of cabins and other structures built by homesteaders, particularly during a period of popularity in the 1950s and 60s, have since been left abandoned. Although a cleanup effort in the early 2000s resulted the demolition of hundreds of abandoned structures,[5] numerous structures built by Small Tract Act homesteaders still exist in various states of use and repair.[6]

More recently, Wonder Valley has earned a reputation for being a fashionable destination for artists,[7] a trend which is frequently attributed to Wonder Valley's association with nearby Joshua Tree National Park.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "San Bernardino County Special Districts Department : CSA 70M - Wonder Valley". www.specialdistricts.org. Retrieved 2017-08-27. 
  2. ^ "Statewide Database". Regents of the University of California. Retrieved April 6, 2015. 
  3. ^ "California's 8th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. 
  4. ^ "Small Tract Act of 1938". Wonder in the Valley. 2015-01-17. Retrieved 2017-08-27. 
  5. ^ VERDIN, TOM (2000-11-05). "Homesteader Legacy Leaves Desert Littered With Abandoned Shacks". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2017-08-27. 
  6. ^ "The Last Homesteads of Wonder Valley, California". CityLab. Retrieved 2017-08-27. 
  7. ^ "Wonder Valley Grows in Size, Appeal". Palm Springs Life. 2016-11-01. Retrieved 2017-08-27. 
  8. ^ "A Cultural Compendium: 7 Things We're Into Right Now". Retrieved 2017-08-27. 

External links[edit]