Wood-Ridge, New Jersey

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Not to be confused with Woodbridge Township, New Jersey or Ridgewood, New Jersey.
Wood-Ridge, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Wood-Ridge
Map highlighting Wood-Ridge's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Wood-Ridge's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Wood-Ridge, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Wood-Ridge, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°51′01″N 74°05′13″W / 40.850183°N 74.087068°W / 40.850183; -74.087068Coordinates: 40°51′01″N 74°05′13″W / 40.850183°N 74.087068°W / 40.850183; -74.087068[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated December 6, 1894
Government[7]
 • Type Borough
 • Body Borough Council
 • Mayor Paul Sarlo (D, term ends December 31, 2019)[3][4]
 • Administrator Christopher W. Eilert[5]
 • Municipal clerk Gina Affuso[6]
Area[1][8]
 • Total 1.097 sq mi (2.842 km2)
 • Land 1.097 sq mi (2.841 km2)
 • Water <0.001 sq mi (<0.001 km2)  0.01%
Area rank 492nd of 566 in state
63rd of 70 in county[1]
Elevation[9] 167 ft (51 m)
Population (2010 Census)[10][11][12]
 • Total 7,626
 • Estimate (2015)[13] 8,249
 • Rank 301st of 566 in state
50th of 70 in county[14]
 • Density 6,951.6/sq mi (2,684.0/km2)
 • Density rank 63rd of 566 in state
19th of 70 in county[14]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07075[15][16]
Area code(s) 201[17]
FIPS code 3400382570[1][18][19]
GNIS feature ID 0885451[1][20]
Website www.njwoodridge.org

Wood-Ridge is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 7,626,[10][11][12] reflecting a decline of 18 (-0.2%) from the 7,644 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 138 (+1.8%) from the 7,506 counted in the 1990 Census.[21]

Wood-Ridge was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on December 6, 1894, from portions of Bergen Township, based on the results of a referendum held the previous day.[22] The borough was formed during the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, in which 26 boroughs were formed in the county in 1894 alone.[23]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.097 square miles (2.842 km2), including 1.097 square miles (2.841 km2) of land and <0.001 square miles (<0.001 km2) of water (0.01%).[1][2]

The borough is bordered by Lodi and Hasbrouck Heights to the north, Wallington to the west, Carlstadt to the south, and Moonachie to the east, along with South Hackensack.[24]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 348
1890 575 65.2%
1900 582 1.2%
1910 1,043 79.2%
1920 1,923 84.4%
1930 5,159 168.3%
1940 5,739 11.2%
1950 6,283 9.5%
1960 7,964 26.8%
1970 8,311 4.4%
1980 7,929 −4.6%
1990 7,506 −5.3%
2000 7,644 1.8%
2010 7,626 −0.2%
Est. 2015 8,249 [13][25] 8.2%
Population sources: 1880-1890[26]
1880-1920[27] 1890-1910[28]
1910-1930[29] 1900-2010[30][31][32]
2000[33][34] 2010[10][11][12]

2010 Census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,626 people, 2,939 households, and 2,072 families residing in the borough. The population density was 6,951.6 per square mile (2,684.0/km2). There were 3,051 housing units at an average density of 2,781.2 per square mile (1,073.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 87.23% (6,652) White, 1.43% (109) Black or African American, 0.21% (16) Native American, 7.13% (544) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 2.32% (177) from other races, and 1.67% (127) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 13.11% (1,000) of the population.[10]

There were 2,939 households out of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.6% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.5% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.16.[10]

In the borough, the population was spread out with 21.5% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 14.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.4 years. For every 100 females there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 89.3 males.[10]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $90,411 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,617) and the median family income was $95,972 (+/- $7,148). Males had a median income of $64,658 (+/- $7,287) versus $46,402 (+/- $6,549) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $35,360 (+/- $2,759). About 3.9% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.8% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over.[35]

Same-sex couples headed 20 households in 2010, an increase from the 10 counted in 2000.[36]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census,[18] there were 7,644 people, 3,024 households, and 2,137 families residing in the borough. The population density was 6,958.5 people per square mile (2,683.1/km2). There were 3,087 housing units at an average density of 2,810.2 per square mile (1,083.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.01% White, 0.84% African American, 0.08% Native American, 5.02% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.77% from other races, and 1.27% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.27% of the population.[33][34]

There were 3,024 households out of which 29.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.9% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.3% were non-families. 25.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.07.[33][34]

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.2% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 31.9% from 25 to 44, 24.6% from 45 to 64, and 17.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 90.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.2 males.[33][34]

The median income for a household in the borough was $60,949, and the median income for a family was $72,500. Males had a median income of $48,309 versus $40,025 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,865. About 0.8% of families and 1.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.6% of those under age 18 and 2.8% of those age 65 or over.[33][34]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Municipal Building in February 2009

Wood-Ridge is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by Wood-Ridge, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[37][38]

As of 2016, the Mayor of Wood-Ridge is Democrat Paul Sarlo, whose term of office ends December 31, 2019; Sarlo also represents the district in the New Jersey Senate.[3] Members of the Borough Council are Council President Catherine Cassidy (D, 2016), Ezio I. Altamura (D, 2018), Dominick Azzolini (D, 2017), Joseph DiMarco (D, 2016), Edward Marino (D, 2018) and Phil Romero (D, 2017).[39][40][41][42][43][44]

In September 2012, the Borough Council selected Phil Romero from a list of three candidates offered by the Democratic Municipal Committee to fill the vacant seat of Cosimo "Tom" Gonnella, who had resigned from office to accept a position with Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission after serving 16 years in office, making him the longest-serving councilmeber in borough history.[45]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Wood-Ridge is located in the 9th Congressional District[46] and is part of New Jersey's 36th state legislative district.[11][47][48]

New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson).[49] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[50] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[51][52]

For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 36th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Paul Sarlo (D, Wood-Ridge) and in the General Assembly by Marlene Caride (D, Ridgefield) and Gary Schaer (D, Passaic).[53] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[54] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[55]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[56] As of 2015, the County Executive is James J. Tedesco III (D, Paramus; term ends December 31, 2018).[57] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[58] Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2017; Fort Lee),[59] Vice Chairman Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[60] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[61] David L. Ganz (D, 2017; Fair Lawn),[62] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes)[63] Thomas J. Sullivan Jr., (D, Montvale, 2015; serving the unexpired term of office that had been occupied by James Tedesco before he was sworn in as County Executive)[64][65] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[66][67] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[68] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R)[69] and Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill).[70][71][56]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,764 registered voters in Wood-Ridge, of which 1,405 (29.5% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 844 (17.7% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 2,513 (52.7% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[72] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 62.5% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 79.6% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[72][73]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,028 votes (52.5% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 1,777 votes (46.0% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 33 votes (0.9% vs. 0.9%), among the 3,866 ballots cast by the borough's 5,085 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.0% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[74][75] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,073 votes (51.2% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,910 votes (47.2% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 32 votes (0.8% vs. 0.8%), among the 4,046 ballots cast by the borough's 5,038 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.3% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[76][77] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,073 votes (52.7% vs. 47.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,814 votes (46.1% vs. 51.7%) and other candidates with 28 votes (0.7% vs. 0.7%), among the 3,932 ballots cast by the borough's 4,926 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.8% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[78]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 57.3% of the vote (1,533 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 41.7% (1,115 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (29 votes), among the 2,777 ballots cast by the borough's 5,098 registered voters (100 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 54.5%.[79][80] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,146 votes (51.6% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 955 votes (43.0% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 93 votes (4.2% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 3 votes (0.1% vs. 0.5%), among the 2,221 ballots cast by the borough's 4,263 registered voters, yielding a 52.1% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[81]

Education[edit]

Wood-Ridge High School

Students in public school for pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade attend the schools of the Wood-Ridge School District. As of the 2012-13 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,141 students and 79.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.4:1.[82] Schools in the district are Catherine E. Doyle Elementary School[83] for pre-K through 3rd grade (had 500 students in K-5 in 2012-13), Wood-Ridge Intermediate School,[84] with students in grades 4-6 (had 279 in grades 6-8 at Gretta R. Ostrovsky Middle School) and Wood-Ridge High School[85] with students in grades 7–12 (had 362 in grades 9-12).[86]

With the opening of Wood-Ridge Intermediate School in September 2013 for grades 4-6, Doyle Elementary School was realigned to serve students through third grade, while the students in grades 7 and 8 who had attended Gretta R. Ostrovsky Middle School began attending Wood-Ridge Junior / Senior High School.[87]

For ninth through twelfth grades, students from Moonachie attend Wood-Ridge High School, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Moonachie School District.[88]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[89][90]

Our Lady of Assumption School, a Catholic school that served students in Kindergarten through 8th grade, was closed as of June 2010 by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark in the face of enrollment that had declined to 134 students in the school's final year.[91]

Emergency services[edit]

Police[edit]

The Wood-Ridge Police Department (WRPD) provides emergency and protective services to the borough of Wood-Ridge, augmented in times of emergency by the Police Auxiliary. The WRPD consists of 21 officers, led by Chief Joseph Rutigliano.[92]

Fire[edit]

The Wood-Ridge Fire Department (WRFD) is an all-volunteer fire department. The WRFD was organized in 1897 and consists of one Chief and two assistant chiefs. The department is staffed by 40 fully trained firefighters. The WRFD also provides emergency medical service to the borough. The WRFD utilizes three fire engines, a ladder truck, a heavy rescue vehicle and two ambulances.[93]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 19.20 miles (30.90 km) of roadways, of which 16.25 miles (26.15 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.30 miles (3.70 km) by Bergen County and 0.65 miles (1.05 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[94]

Route 17 passes through Wood-Ridge.

Public transportation[edit]

The New Jersey Transit Wood-Ridge station, facing southbound from the lone platform

Wood-Ridge is served by NJ Transit at the Wood-Ridge train station, located at Park Place East near the intersection with Route 17.[95] The Pascack Valley Line offers service throughout the day in both directions, with service available seven days a week, operating north-south to Hoboken Terminal with connections via the Secaucus Junction transfer station to New Jersey Transit one-stop service to New York Penn Station and to other NJ Transit rail service. Connections are available at the Hoboken Terminal to other New Jersey Transit rail lines, the PATH train at the Hoboken PATH station, New York Waterways ferry service to the World Financial Center and other destinations and Hudson-Bergen Light Rail service.[96]

The Wesmont station provides train service on the Bergen County Line.[97] The station was approved in 2008 to be constructed in Wood-Ridge.[98] The station serves a new residential development[99][100] and was opened to the public in May 2016, after years of delays.[101]

Wood-Ridge is also served by several NJ Transit bus routes. The 76 bus runs from Hackensack along Terrace Avenue through Wood-Ridge to Newark Penn Station. The 144, 145, 148, 163 and 164 buses run from various New Jersey terminals such as Midland Park and Hackensack along Valley Boulevard through Wood-Ridge to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.[102][103]

Notable people[edit]

The Wood-Ridge Public Library is in the Brinkerhoff House, listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Wood-Ridge include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Official Biography of Mayor Paul Sarlo, Borough of Wood-Ridge. Accessed June 18, 2016.
  4. ^ 2017 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 30, 2017.
  5. ^ Administrator, Borough of Wood-Ridge. Accessed June 18, 2016.
  6. ^ Borough Clerk. Borough of Wood-Ridge. Accessed June 18, 2016.
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  8. ^ GCT-PH1: Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- Place and (in selected states) County Subdivision from 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 12, 2012.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Wood-Ridge, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
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  13. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015 - 2015 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 22, 2016.
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  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Wood-Ridge, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 11, 2012.
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  105. ^ Brock, David. "Blinded by the Right: The Conscience of an Ex-Conservative", p. 11. Random House, 2003. ISBN 1-4000-4728-5. Accessed June 11, 2012. "For instance, I remember walking to my Catholic elementary school, Our Lady of the Assumption, in Wood-Ridge, New Jersey, a suburb just outside New York City, each morning with a neighbor, Lynn, who lived up the street a few houses away."
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  107. ^ Anzidei, Melanie. "iPhone 6 sales kick-off draws crowds in Bergen County", North Jersey Media Group, September 19, 2014. Accessed September 5, 2015. "Mike Cronin, 16, of Wood-Ridge and his father Paul arrived at the mall at 4:15 a.m. and it took them more than eight hours to reach the front of the line at the Apple store at the Plaza."
  108. ^ Mills, Ed. "Where are they now? Former NFL star Bob DeMarco of Wood-Ridge", The Record (Bergen County), January 28, 2014. Accessed January 25, 2017. "Growing up in Wood-Ridge, DeMarco was a two-way lineman at St. Mary and played as a sophomore on the Gaels' unbeaten nine-win team in 1953."
  109. ^ Sloan, Patricia Helbig; and Cassidy, Catherine. 'Wood-Ridge, p. 118. Arcadia Publishing, 2004. ISBN 9780738535562. Accessed January 25, 2017. "John Molinelli was raised in Wood-Ridge. He graduated from Assumption School and Wood-Ridge High School and went on to Rutgers University and New York University Law School. Following law school, he resided in Wood-Ridge for several years and was active in the local Democratic party."
  110. ^ Rohan, Virginia. "'MALCOLM' STAR STAYS GROUNDED", The Record (Bergen County), March 6, 2000. Accessed May 7, 2008. "On the phone from Los Angeles, at 7:30 a.m. his time, the 14-year-old actor from Wood-Ridge seems just as friendly and chipper as he did before his Fox comedy "Malcolm in the Middle" debuted -- and became an instant hit."
  111. ^ MacDonald "Spotlight: Bob Sullivan", Bankrate, April 21, 2008. Accessed December 23, 2013. "Name: Bob Sullivan; Hometown: Wood-Ridge, N.J."

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