Buckeye – Woodhill (RTA Rapid Transit station)

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Buckeye Woodhill
GCRTA wordmark logo.svg  Blue Line   Green Line  light rail station
Buckeye-Woodhill Rapid Station September 2015.JPG
Location 9528 Buckeye Road
Cleveland, Ohio 44104
Coordinates 41°28′58″N 81°37′7″W / 41.48278°N 81.61861°W / 41.48278; -81.61861Coordinates: 41°28′58″N 81°37′7″W / 41.48278°N 81.61861°W / 41.48278; -81.61861
Owned by Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority
Line(s)
Platforms 2 side platforms
Tracks 2
Connections

GCRTA wordmark logo.svg Bus transport 10

GCRTA wordmark logo.svg Bus transport 11
Construction
Structure type At-grade
Parking 33 spaces[1]
Disabled access Yes
History
Opened April 11, 1920[2]
Rebuilt October 30, 1981
October 23, 2012[3][4]
Services
Preceding station   GCRTA wordmark logo.svg Rapid Transit   Following station
toward Tower City
Blue Line
Green Line
toward Green Road
Former services
Preceding station   GCRTA wordmark logo.svg Rapid Transit   Following station
Van Aken
Line
1975-1978
toward Warrensville
Shaker
Line
1975-1978
toward Green
Shaker Heights Rapid Transit
Van Aken
Line
1944-1975
toward Warrensville
Shaker
Line
1944-1975
toward Green
Cleveland Interurban Railroad
Moreland
Division
1920-1944
toward Warrensville
Shaker
Division
1920-1944
toward Green

Buckeye–Woodhill Rapid Station is a station on the RTA Blue and Green Lines in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. It is located at the intersection of Woodhill Road, Buckeye Road and Shaker Boulevard.

The station comprises side platforms below grade west of the intersection. Two concrete stairways, one on the north from Buckeye Road and the second on the south from Woodhill Road, lead down to the platforms. There is a small parking lot north of the platforms off Buckeye Road.

History[edit]

The station opened on April 11, 1920 as Woodhill, when service commenced on the line west of Shaker Square to East 34th Street and via surface streets to downtown.[2]

The station was located at the mouth of a cut over a mile in length from Shaker Square. The cut averages 25 feet (7.6 m) in depth, but just before Buckeye–Woodhill it is up to 40 feet (12 m) deep, with a 2.44 percent incline down from the Shaker Square (the steepest grade on the line). The line was constructed with a tunnel under the intersection of Buckeye and Woodhill Roads, which was built without disturbing the automobile and streetcar traffic above. The location of the tunnel dictated the placement of the line.[5]

The material excavated from the cut was used to create an embankment to carry the tracks over the railroad tracks and streets west of Buckeye–Woodhill. The embankment is high as 50 feet (15 m) at places. The cut and fill provide the means for the trains to traverse the Portage Escarpment that separates much of the city of Cleveland from suburbs such as Shaker Heights and Cleveland Heights.

The station in July 2007.

In 1980 and 1981, the trunk line of the Green and Blue Lines from East 55th Street to Shaker Square was completely renovated with new track, ballast, poles and wiring, and new stations were built along the line. At Buckeye–Woodhill, new platforms were installed, and the wooden stairways were replaced by concrete stairways covered by tinted acrylic glass canopies. The renovated line opened on October 30, 1981.[3]

Between 2011 and 2012, the RTA renovated Buckeye–Woodhill once more with funding received as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The platforms were renovated with tactile edges installed, the covered stairways were replaced with ones of a more contemporary design and appearance, and new wheelchair ramps were installed, making the station ADA accessible. The rebuilt station was dedicated on October 23, 2012.[4]

Notable places nearby[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Buckeye – Woodhill Rapid Station". Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority. 2012. Retrieved April 19, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b Toman, James (1990). The Shaker Heights Rapid Transit. Glendale, California: Interurban Press. p. 22. ISBN 0-916374-95-5. 
  3. ^ a b Toman (1990). p. 115.
  4. ^ a b http://www.riderta.com/newsroom/releases/?listingid=1798
  5. ^ Toman (1990). p. 20.

External links[edit]