City of South Brisbane

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The former South Brisbane Municipal Chambers

The City of South Brisbane was a local government area on the southern side of the Brisbane River, Queensland, Australia. It was established in 1888 and existed until 1925 when it was amalgamated into the City of Brisbane.[1]

History[edit]

Map of Borough of South Brisbane and adjacent local government areas, March 1902

When the Town of Brisbane was first established, it was predominantly on the northern bank of the Brisbane River, but included some areas south of the river, including the ward of Kangaroo Point and the ward of South Brisbane, the area between Vulture Street and the river.[2]

The Queensland Government passed the Divisional Boards Act of 1879 to establish a system of Divisional Boards for the purpose of providing local government for portions of the colony outside the boundaries of municipalities. The first Divisional Boards were proclaimed on 11 November 1879. Although the Woolloongabba Division was intended to be one of the first established, some delays occurred and it was not established until 9 January 1880.[3]

The role of a Divisional Board was to provide such public services as:[3]

  • transport, including roads and bridges
  • public health, including water, sanitation and drainage
  • public amenities, including parks and cemeteries, etc.

Divisional boards were intended to administer areas with lower and more sparse population than that of a municipality. However, population of the Woolloongabba Divisional Board grew rapidly as the result of the introduction of a railway line into South Brisbane. On 7 January 1888, the Borough of South Brisbane was proclaimed a separate Municipal Institution. It combined the areas formerly part of the Division of Woolloongabba and the South Ward of the Municipality of Brisbane. However, the ward of Kangaroo Point remained part of the Town of Brisbane.[1][3]

In 1891, work commenced on the construction of the South Brisbane Town Hall. The building was officially opened on 1 July 1892.[4] Although it was commonly known as the "Town Hall", it was officially called the South Brisbane Municipal Chambers. The town hall is now listed on the Queensland Heritage Register.[5]

South Brisbane Memorial Park, 2010

The South Brisbane Memorial Park commemorates those of South Brisbane who died in World War I. On 20 May 1921 the South Brisbane City Council set aside a triangular block land bounded by Stanley Street, Vulture Street and Sidon Street opposite the South Brisbane Town Hall. On 6 August 1923 the park was dedicated Governor-General of Australia, Henry Forster.[6][7]

Mayors[edit]

The voters elected aldermen to represent them. The aldermen elected one of their number each year to be mayor; this election took place in February each year.

Year Name of Mayor Notes and references
1888 William Stephens [8][9][10]
1889 William Stephens [8][9][11]
1890 Arthur Morry [9][12]
1891 Thomas Heaslop [9][13]
1892 Thomas Heaslop [9][14]
1893 Thomas Heaslop [9][15]
1894 William Jones [9][15]
1895 William Jones William Jones resigned as alderman and mayor in Sept 1895 but was unanimously re-elected a fortnight later.[9][16][17][18]
1896 Abraham Fleetwood Luya [8][9][19]
1897 Abraham Fleetwood Luya [8][9][20]
1898 Abraham Fleetwood Luya [8][9][21]
1899 Philip Nott [9][22]
1900 John Garsden [9][23]
1901 William Stephens [8][9][24]
1902 John Currie [9][25]
1903 George Blocksidge [9][26]
1904 William Jones [9][27]
1905 John Davies [9][28]
1906 Robert Edward Burton [9][29]
1907 Andrew Gillespie [9][30]
1908 David Ballantyne McCullough [9][31]
1909 George Henry Schofield [9][32]
1910 George Alfred Savage [9][33]
1911 Andrew Gillespie [9][34]
1912 John Edward Burke [9][35]
1913 Henry Neylan [9][36]
1914 Joseph Allen [9][37]
1915 James Davey [9][38]
1916 John Edwin Hilton [9][39]
1917 Robert William Henry Long [9][40]
1918 Peter Forrest [9][41]
1919 John Gaffney [9][42]
1920 Alfred Faulkner [9][43][44]
1921 Alfred Faulkner [9]
1922 Alfred Faulkner [9]
1923 Alfred Faulkner [9]
1924 John Keogh [9]
1925 John Keogh [9][45]

Significant places[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "South Brisbane". Queensland Places. University of Queensland. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  2. ^ "Brisbane and Greater Brisbane". Queensland Places. University of Queensland. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c "Agency ID9632, Woolloongabba Divisional Board14 August 2011". Queensland State Archives. 
  4. ^ "Introducing The Chambers". Connections: Connecting the Somerville House Community. 9 (2): 29. 2 September 2011. 
  5. ^ "South Brisbane Municipal Chambers (former) (entry 600306)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 9 April 2014. 
  6. ^ "A MEMORIAL PARK.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 7 August 1923. p. 7. Retrieved 6 April 2014. 
  7. ^ "South Brisbane Memorial Park". Monument Australia. Retrieved 5 April 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f People of South Brisbane Cemetery Archived 16 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine., accessed 14 August 2011
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al McKeering, Brian K. (1992). A Gracious lady : the South Brisbane municipal chambers (the Old Town Hall) 1892–1992. South Brisbane: South Brisbane TAFE. p. 28. ISBN 0-7242-4873-0. 
  10. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 16 February 1888. p. 5. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  11. ^ "THE SOUTH BRISBANE MAYORAL DIFFICULTY.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 14 February 1889. p. 3. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  12. ^ "The Brisbane Courier.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 30 January 1890. p. 4. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  13. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 27 February 1891. p. 6. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  14. ^ "THE ANNUAL ELECTIONS.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 8 February 1892. p. 5. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  15. ^ a b "SOUTH BRISBANE MAYORAL ELECTION.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 2 February 1893. p. 6. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  16. ^ "LOCAL GOVERNMENT.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 11 February 1895. p. 5. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  17. ^ "INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 2 September 1895. p. 4. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  18. ^ "The Brisbane Courier.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 16 September 1895. p. 4. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  19. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 30 January 1896. p. 6. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  20. ^ "LOCAL GOVERNMENT.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 8 February 1897. p. 6. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  21. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 28 January 1898. p. 7. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  22. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE MAYORALTY.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 16 February 1899. p. 7. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  23. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 12 February 1900. p. 6. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  24. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 12 February 1901. p. 7. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  25. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 13 February 1902. p. 5. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  26. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE MUNICIPALITY.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 10 February 1903. p. 7. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  27. ^ "LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTIONS. SOUTH BRISBANE.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 6 February 1904. p. 5. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  28. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE MUNICIPALITY.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 9 February 1905. p. 7. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  29. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE CITY COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 3 February 1906. p. 6. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  30. ^ "MAYORAL ELECTIONS.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 9 February 1907. p. 5. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  31. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 8 February 1908. p. 6. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  32. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 6 February 1909. p. 6. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  33. ^ "LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTIONS. SOUTH BRISBANE CITY COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 5 February 1910. p. 5. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  34. ^ "LOCAL GOVERNMENT.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 25 January 1911. p. 5. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  35. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE MAYORALTY.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 13 February 1912. p. 4. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  36. ^ "LOCAL GOVERNMENT.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 11 February 1913. p. 4. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  37. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE CITY COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 7 February 1914. p. 5. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  38. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE CITY COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 13 February 1915. p. 7. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  39. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE CITY COUNCIL.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 25 January 1916. p. 8. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  40. ^ "LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELEGTIONS.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 13 February 1917. p. 8. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  41. ^ "LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTIONS SOUTH BRISBAHE'S MAYOR.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 12 February 1918. p. 8. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  42. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE—ALDERMAN GAFFNEY.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 15 February 1919. p. 7. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  43. ^ "SOUTH BRISBANE MAYORALTY.". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 12 February 1920. p. 7. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  44. ^ Australian History Publishing Co (1936), Queensland and Queenslanders : incorporating 'Prominent Queenslanders', Australian History Publishing Co, p. 112, retrieved 1 October 2015  — available online
  45. ^ "Mayors And Chairmen Of Councils Who Were Entertained Yesterday By Alderman Jolly". The Brisbane Courier. National Library of Australia. 1 October 1925. p. 9. Retrieved 26 December 2013. 

External links[edit]

  • "South Brisbane". Queensland Places. Centre for the Government of Queensland, University of Queensland. 

Coordinates: 27°28′59″S 153°01′30″E / 27.483°S 153.025°E / -27.483; 153.025