Word of Thoth

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The "Word of Thoth" is a fictional language created by Matthew Reilly that has, so far, appeared in Seven Ancient Wonders (published in U.S.A. as Seven Deadly Wonders), The Six Sacred Stones, and The Five Greatest Warriors.

In the books only the oracle twins and the Neetha tribe[1] can read and speak the Word of Thoth, which comes up numerous times, and help guide the heroes through traps. "Thoth" is the name for the Egyptian god of language, who had different forms, the most common of which is the ibis bird. The Word of Thoth has different languages inside itself, increasing in difficulty, that the oracles learn as they get older. In the first book it leads the heroes through the seven ancient wonders, from youngest (the Colossus of Rhodes) to oldest (the Great Pyramid).

Numbers[edit]

Numbers are represented by a combination of vertical and horizontal lines. For instance, a single horizontal line represents the number one in the Word of Thoth. Similarly two, three, and four horizontal lines one above another represent numbers two, three and four respectively. The number five is denoted by four horizontal lines, one on top of the other, next to a single vertical line to the right. The number six is denoted by four horizontal lines, one on top of the other, next to two vertical lines to the right. Since these are primarily the only numbers used in the book in reference to the six sacred stones, not much information is available regarding other numbers.

Symbols[edit]

A "v" in the Word of Thoth means "to cleanse". The number of v's one above the other denotes how many times the "cleansing" has to be done.[2] Although there are a handful other symbols depicted in the books, no word-to-word translations, or the key to decrypt the inscriptions are detailed in the book. This makes any further information regarding the alphabet and the various symbols in the Word of Thoth purely a guesswork.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Six Sacred Stones
  2. ^ Reilly, Matthew (2010). The five greatest warriors (1st Pocket Books pbk. ed.). New York: Pocket Books. pp. 103–104. ISBN 978-1-4165-7758-4.