World Choir Games

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Saint John's Choir performing at the 4th World Choir Games in Xiamen, China

The World Choir Games (formerly named the Choir Olympics) is the largest global choral festival and competition.[1] Organised by the Interkultur Foundation for amateur choirs from all over the world, regardless of their country of origin, race, genre of music or artistic ambitions, its motto is "Singing together brings nations together".[2] The Games originated from the idea to bring people together through singing in peaceful competition, showing that unity of nations through the arts can be effectively and illustratively demonstrated and challenged.[3] The focus of the Games is on participation above winning, and it aims to inspire people to "experience the strength of interaction, challenging personality and community equally by singing together".[4]

The most recent host of the Games was Tshwane, South Africa from 4 - 14 July 2018, and the next edition of the Games will be co-hosted by Antwerp and Ghent, Belgium from 5 – 15 July 2020.[5][6]

General[edit]

The Games are hosted biennially (every even year) in a pre-select city across the globe, where choirs compete in selected categories. In 2012, for instance, there were 23 categories,[7] and in 2016 there were 29 categories, among them "Senior Choirs" and "University Choirs".[8] The Games consist of competitions in two classes (Champions and Open), festival concerts, artistic workshops, and various ceremonies.[9] During the competition, choirs compete for gold, silver, bronze, or "Successful Participation" awards. Medals are awarded in the Champions Competition, and diplomas are awarded in the Open Competition. The choir that attains the highest point and a gold medal in a category during the Champions Competition is awarded the title of "Champion of the World Choir Games" for that category.

As part of the festival aspect of the Games choirs may also choose to participate in artistic workshops featuring renowned choral instructors, as well as friendship concerts and free public concerts where choirs share their music with choristers and audiences from different parts of the world.[10][11] Ceremonies that form part of the Games include opening and closing ceremonies where up to 20 000 choristers join in a single venue, as well as the award ceremonies where the outcomes of the Open Competition and Champions Competition are announced. During the proceedings of the Games, the host for the next edition of the Games is usually also announced.

Competitions[edit]

Year Competition Host city Dates Participating countries Participating choirs Categories Medals awarded
Gold Silver Bronze
2000 1st Choir Olympics[12] Austria Linz, Austria 7–16 July[13] 60 342 28 69 124 34
2002 2nd Choir Olympics[14] South Korea Busan, South Korea 19–27 October[15] 48 288 25 54 102 38
2004 3rd Choir Olympics[16] Germany Bremen, Germany 8–18 July[17] 83 360 26 98 163 33
2006 4th World Choir Games[18] China Xiamen, China 15–26 July[19] 80 400 26 75 140 39
2008 5th World Choir Games[20] Austria Graz, Austria 9–19 July[21] 93 441 28 130 191 27
2010 6th World Choir Games[22] China Shaoxing, China 15–26 July[23] 83 472 24 66 117 28
2012 7th World Choir Games[24] United States Cincinnati, United States 4–14 July[25] 64 362 23 106 13 19
2014 8th World Choir Games[26] Latvia Riga, Latvia 9–19 July[27] 73 460 29 229 174 16
2016 9th World Choir Games[28] Russia Sochi, Russia 6–16 July[29] 73 283 29 116 86 4
2018 10th World Choir Games[30] South Africa Tshwane, South Africa 4–14 July[31] 62 300 28 134 92 12
2020 11th World Choir Games Belgium Antwerp and Ghent, Belgium 5-15 July[32] TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tomczyk, Cari (27 August 2008). "Singing together brings nations together". The Abington Journal. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  2. ^ "About: World Choir Games". www.interkultur.com. Retrieved 25 July 2018.
  3. ^ "About: World Choir Games". www.interkultur.com. Retrieved 25 July 2018.
  4. ^ "The Best Choir in the World". Archival Moments. 14 July 2012. Retrieved 25 July 2018.
  5. ^ "University of Pretoria co-hosts World Choir Games 2018". www.up.ac.ZA. Retrieved 25 July 2018.
  6. ^ "11th World Choir Games 2020 to be held in Flanders". www.interkultur.com. Retrieved 25 July 2018.
  7. ^ Oakwood Staff (16 July 2012). "Oakwood's Aeolians win awards in world choir competition". Retrieved 17 July 2012.
  8. ^ "World Choir Games - Sochi 2016: INTERKULTUR". www.interkultur.com. Retrieved 29 June 2018.
  9. ^ "About: World Choir Games". www.interkultur.com. Retrieved 25 July 2018.
  10. ^ "Education through Interkultur". www.interkultur.com. Retrieved 25 July 2018.
  11. ^ "About: World Choir Games". www.interkultur.com. Retrieved 25 July 2018.
  12. ^ "1st Choral Olympics 2000". Interkultur. Retrieved 19 July 2018.
  13. ^ "1st Choir Olympics Linz, Austria (2000)". Interkultur. Archived from the original on 13 July 2011. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  14. ^ "2nd Choir Olympics 2002". Interkultur. Retrieved 19 July 2018.
  15. ^ "2nd Choir Olympics Busan, Republic of Korea (2002)". Interkultur. Archived from the original on 13 July 2011. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  16. ^ "3rd Choir Olympics 2004". Interkultur. Retrieved 19 July 2018.
  17. ^ "3rd Choir Olympics Bremen, Germany (2004)". Interkultur. Archived from the original on 13 July 2011. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  18. ^ "4th World Choir Games 2006". Interkultur. Retrieved 19 July 2018.
  19. ^ "4th World Choir Games Xiamen, China (2006)". Interkultur. Archived from the original on 13 July 2011. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  20. ^ "5th World Choir Games 2008". Interkultur. Retrieved 19 July 2018.
  21. ^ "5th World Choir Games Graz, Austria (2008)". Interkultur. Archived from the original on 13 July 2011. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  22. ^ "6th World Choir Games 2010". Interkultur. Retrieved 19 July 2018.
  23. ^ "6th World Choir Games Shaoxing/Shanghai, China (2006)". Interkultur. Archived from the original on 17 September 2011. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  24. ^ "7th World Choir Games 2012". Interkultur. Retrieved 19 July 2018.
  25. ^ "7th World Choir Games Cincinnati (Ohio), USA (2012)". Interkultur. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  26. ^ "8th World Choir Games 2014". Interkultur. Retrieved 19 July 2018.
  27. ^ "Rīgā notiks Pasaules koru olimpiāde". Delfi. Retrieved 1 March 2012.
  28. ^ "9th World Choir Games 2016". Interkultur. Retrieved 19 July 2018.
  29. ^ "Interkultur prezidents: Soči ir piemērota vieta koru olimpiādei". Ir.lv. Retrieved 20 July 2014.
  30. ^ "10th World Choir Games 2018". Interkultur. Retrieved 19 July 2018.
  31. ^ "World Choir Games - Pretoria 2018: INTERKULTUR". www.interkultur.com. Retrieved 17 June 2018.
  32. ^ "11TH WORLD CHOIR GAMES 2020 TO BE HELD IN FLANDERS". www.interkultur.com. Retrieved 21 June 2018.

External links[edit]