World Diabetes Day

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Logo for World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day is the primary global awareness campaign focusing on diabetes mellitus and is held on November 14 each year.

Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), each World Diabetes Day focuses on a theme related to diabetes, a largely preventable and treatable non-communicable disease that is rapidly increasing in numbers worldwide.[1] Topics covered have included diabetes and human rights, diabetes and lifestyle, diabetes and obesity, diabetes in the disadvantaged and the vulnerable, and diabetes in children and adolescents. While the campaigns last the whole year, the day itself marks the birthday of Frederick Banting who, along with Charles Best and John James Rickard Macleod, first conceived the idea which led to the discovery of insulin in 1922.

History[edit]

World Diabetes Day was launched in 1991 by the IDF and the World Health Organization (WHO) in response to the rapid rise of diabetes around the world.[1][2]

By 2016, World Diabetes Day was being celebrated by over 230 IDF member associations in more than 160 countries and territories, as well as by other organizations, companies, healthcare professionals, politicians, celebrities, and people living with diabetes and their families.[3] Activities include diabetes screening programmes, radio and television campaigns, sports events and others.

Themes[edit]

Themes of previous World Diabetes Day campaigns have focused on different factors that influence the risk of diabetes and its complications:

  • 2016: Eyes on Diabetes.
  • 2015: Healthy Eating.
  • 2014: Go Blue for Breakfast.
  • 2013: Protect our Future: Diabetes Education and Prevention.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Previous campaigns". World Diabetes Day. International Diabetes Federation. Retrieved 4 November 2010. 
  2. ^ World Health Organization. Promoting health through the life-course: World Diabetes Day 2016. Geneva, accessed 7 November 2016.
  3. ^ Diabetes.co.uk.Diabetes Week.

External links[edit]