World Hard Court Championships

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World Hard Court Championships
Defunct tennis tournament
Founded 1912
Abolished 1923
Editions 7
Location Paris, France (1912–1921, 1923)
Brussels, Belgium (1922)
Surface Clay / Outdoor

World Hard Court Championships (WHCC) was an annual major tennis tournament held from 1912 to 1923, principally in Paris, France. The venue was the clay courts of the Stade Français in Saint-Cloud, Paris, with one exception, when they were held at the Royal Leopold Club in Brussels, Belgium, in 1922.[1]

It was open to all international amateur players from all nationalities, unlike the French Championships, which were open only to tennis players who were members of clubs in France through 1924; because of this the WHCC is sometimes considered as the proper precursor to the French Open.[2] The French Championships were also held at a different venue at the time, the Racing Club de France, Paris.

At an Annual General Meeting (AGM) held on 16 March 1923 in Paris, France the ILTF issued the ‘Rules of Tennis’ that were adopted with public effect on 1 January 1924. USA became an affiliated member of the ILTF. The World Championship title was also dropped at this meeting and a new category of Official Championship was created for events in Great Britain, France, USA and Australia – today’s Grand Slam events.The WHCC tournament was then disbanded by the ILTF.[3]

The WHCC was not played in 1924, when Paris hosted the Olympic Games and its tennis tournament, also held on clay courts, took the place of the championship. In 1925 the French Championships opened to international competitors for the first time, with the event held alternately between the Stade Français (1925, 1927), which was the site of the WHCC, and the Racing Club de France (1926), which was the site of the previous French Championship.[4] From 1928, the French Championships moved to Stade Roland Garros.

Anthony Wilding was the only male multiple champion in the singles event, winning the title in 1913 and 1914, while Suzanne Lenglen won the women's singles title four times (1914, 1921–23).[5]

Champions[edit]

1913 World Hard Court Championships men's final between Anthony Wilding and André Gobert (15 June 1913)
1913 World Hard Court Championships ladies' final between Mieken Rieck and Marguerite Brocquedis (15 June 1913)

Men's singles[edit]

Year Champion Runner-up Score
1912 Germany Otto Froitzheim Germany Oscar Kreuzer 6–2, 7–5, 4–6, 7–5
1913 New Zealand Anthony Wilding France André Gobert 6–3, 6–3, 1–6, 6–4
1914 New Zealand Anthony Wilding Austria Ludwig von Salm-Hoogstraeten 6–0, 6–2, 6–4
1915 No competition (due to World War I)
1916
1917
1918
1920 France William Laurentz France André Gobert 9–7, 6–2, 3–6, 6–2
1921 United States Bill Tilden Belgium Jean Washer 6–3, 6–3, 6–3
1922 France Henri Cochet Spain Manuel de Gomar 6–0, 2–6, 4–6, 6–1, 6–2
1923 United States Bill Johnston Belgium Jean Washer 4–6, 6–2, 6–2, 4–6, 6–3
1924 No competition (Paris Olympics held instead)

Women's Singles[edit]

Year Champion Runner-up Score
1912 France Marguerite Broquedis Germany Mieken Rieck 6–3, 0–6, 6–4
1913 Germany Mieken Rieck France Marguerite Broquedis 6–4, 3–6, 6–4
1914 France Suzanne Lenglen France Germaine Golding 6–2, 6–1
1915 No competition (due to World War I)
1916
1917
1918
1920 United Kingdom Dorothy Holman Spain Francisca Subirana 6–0, 7–5
1921 France Suzanne Lenglen United States Molla Mallory 6–2, 6–3
1922 France Suzanne Lenglen United States Elizabeth Ryan 6–3, 6–2
1923 France Suzanne Lenglen United Kingdom Kitty McKane 6–3, 6–3
1924 No competition (Paris Olympics held instead)

Men's Doubles[edit]

Year Champion Runner-up Score
1912 Germany Otto Froitzheim
Germany Oscar Kreuzer
South Africa Harold Kitson
South Africa Charles Winslow
4–6, 6–2, 6–1, 6–3
1913 Germany Moritz von Bissing
Germany Heinrich Kleinschroth
Germany Otto Froitzheim
New Zealand Anthony Wilding
7–5, 0–6, 6–3, 8–6
1914 France Max Decugis
France Maurice Germot
United Kingdom Arthur Gore
United Kingdom Algernon Kingscote
6–1, 11–9, 6–8, 6–2
1915 No competition (due to World War I)
1916
1917
1918
1920 France André Gobert
France William Laurentz
South Africa Cecil Blackbeard
Romania Nicolae Mişu
6–4, 6–2, 6–1
1921 France André Gobert
France William Laurentz
France Pierre Albarran
France Alain Gerbault
6–4, 6–2, 6–8, 6–2
1922 France Jean Borotra
France Henri Cochet
France Marcel Dupont
Romania Nicolae Mişu
6–8, 6–1, 6–2, 6–3
1923 France Jacques Brugnon
France Marcel Dupont
Armenia Leonce Aslangul
Italy Uberto de Morpurgo
10–12, 3–6, 6–2, 6–3, 6–4
1924 No competition (Paris Olympics held instead)

Women's Doubles[edit]

Year Champion Runner-up Score
1912 No women's doubles held
1913
1914 France Suzanne Lenglen
United States Elizabeth Ryan
France Blanche Amblard
France Suzanne Amblard
6–1, 6–1
1915 No competition (due to World War I)
1916
1917
1918
1920 United Kingdom Dorothy Holman
United Kingdom Phyllis Satterthwaite
France Germaine Golding
France Jeanne Vaussard
6–3, 6–1
1921 France Germaine Golding
France Suzanne Lenglen
United Kingdom Dorothy Holman
South Africa Irene Peacock
6–2, 6–2
1922 France Suzanne Lenglen
United States Elizabeth Ryan
United Kingdom Winifred Beamish
United Kingdom Kitty McKane
6–0, 6–4
1923 United Kingdom Winifred Beamish
United Kingdom Kitty McKane
France Germaine Golding
France Suzanne Lenglen
6–2, 6–3
1924 No competition (Paris Olympics held instead)

Mixed Doubles[edit]

Year Champion Runner-up Score
1912 France Max Decugis
Belgium Anne de Borman
Germany Heinrich Kleinschroth
Germany Mieken Rieck
6–4, 7–5
1913 France Max Decugis
United States Elizabeth Ryan
New Zealand Anthony Wilding
France Germaine Golding
walkover
1914 France Max Decugis
United States Elizabeth Ryan
Austria Ludwig von Salm-Hoogstraeten
France Suzanne Lenglen
6–3, 6–1
1915 No competition (due to World War I)
1916
1917
1918
1920 France William Laurentz
France Germaine Golding
France Max Decugis
France Suzanne Amblard
walkover
1921 France Max Decugis
France Suzanne Lenglen
France William Laurentz
France Germaine Golding
6–3, 6–2
1922 France Henri Cochet
France Suzanne Lenglen
United Kingdom Brian Gilbert
United Kingdom Geraldine Beamish
6–4, 4–6, 6–0
1923 France Henri Cochet
France Suzanne Lenglen
United Kingdom Brian Gilbert
United Kingdom Kitty McKane
6–2, 10–8
1924 No competition (Paris Olympics held instead)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tingay, Lance (1983). The Guinness Book of Tennis Facts and Feats. Guinness Superlatives Limited. p. 231. ISBN 0-85112-289-2. 
  2. ^ "French Open history". Retrieved 3 August 2015. 
  3. ^ "ITF: History". ITF Tennis. London, United Kingdom: International Tennis Federation. 2018. Retrieved 5 September 2018. 
  4. ^ "Roland Garros: a venue open all year long. Past Winners and Draws". ftt.fr. Retrieved 2007-08-07. 
  5. ^ "Tennis". Star (11134). Papers Past. 20 July 1914. p. 4. 

External links[edit]