World Judo Championships

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World Judo Championships
Current event or competition:
2021 World Judo Championships
Judo World Championship.png
Competition details
DisciplineJudo
TypeJudo, annual
OrganiserInternational Judo Federation (IJF)
History
First edition1956 in Tokyo, Japan
Editions59 (2021)
Most wins Japan – 382 medals
(164 gold medals)

The World Judo Championships are the highest level of international judo competition, along with the Olympic judo competition. The championships are held once every year (except the years when the Olympics take place) by the International Judo Federation, and qualified judoka compete in their respective categories as representatives of their home countries. Team competitions have also been held since 1994. The men's championships began in 1956, though the format and periodicity of the championships have changed over time. The last edition of the championships took place in Tokyo, Japan in 2019.

History[edit]

The first World Judo Champion, Shokichi Natsui in 1956

The first edition of the world championships took place in Tokyo, Japan in 1956. There were no weight classes at the time and Japanese judoka Shokichi Natsui became the first world champion in history, defeating fellow countryman Yoshihiko Yoshimatsu in the final. The second world championship was also held in Tokyo two years later, with the Japanese winning the top two spots in the competition for the second time. In 1961, the championship was held outside Japan for the first time, and Dutch judoka Anton Geesink defeated the prior world champion, Koji Sone, in Paris, France, to become the first non-Japanese world champion.

The 1965 World Judo Championships were held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and weight classes were implemented for the first time with the addition of the −68 kg, −80 kg, and +80 kg categories. Judo had become an Olympic sport at the 1964 Summer Olympics held in Tokyo, and a permanent sport after a brief absence at the 1968 Summer Olympics.

Despite this progressive enlargement, it took until 1980 for women to participate in the world championships. The first women's world championships were held in New York City in 1980, and were held in alternating years as the men's championships until the 1987 World Judo Championships in Essen, where the two competitions were merged into one world championship. The mixed championships have been held biannually since 1987. In 2005, the world championships made its debut on the African continent in Cairo, Egypt. In the International Judo Federation meeting held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 2007 (during the 2007 World Judo Championships), it was decided that France would host the world championships for the fifth time in 2011.

Weight classes[edit]

There are currently 16 tournaments in the world championships, with 8 weight classes for each gender.

Competitions by year[edit]

The world championships have been held in every continent except Oceania and Antarctica.

Men's competitions[edit]

Number Year Dates City and host country Venue # Countries # Athletes Ref.
1 1956 3 May Japan Tokyo, Japan Kuramae Kokugikan 21 31 [1][2]
2 1958 30 November Japan Tokyo, Japan Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium 18 39 [3][4]
3 1961 2 December France Paris, France Stade Pierre de Coubertin 25 57 [5][6]
4 1965 14–17 October Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Marrocanzinho gymnasium 42 150 [7][8]
5 1967 9–11 August United States Salt Lake City, United States Gymnasium at the University of Utah 25 115 [9][10]
6 1969 23–25 October Mexico Mexico City, Mexico Palacio de los Deportes 39 187 [11][12]
7 1971 2–4 September West Germany Ludwigshafen, West Germany Friedrich-Ebert-Halle 52 310 [13][14]
8 1973 22–24 June Switzerland Lausanne, Switzerland Pavillon des Sports de Beaulieu 50 288 [15][16]
9 1975 23–25 October Austria Vienna, Austria 46 274 [17][18]
1977 19–24 September Spain Barcelona, Spain Palau dels Esports Cancelled [19]
10 1979 6–9 December France Paris, France Stade Pierre de Coubertin 54 273 [20][21]
11 1981 3–6 September Netherlands Maastricht, Netherlands Euro Hall 51 255 [22] [23]
12 1983 13–16 October Soviet Union Moscow, Soviet Union Lenin Palace of Sports 44 226 [24][25]
13 1985 26–29 September South Korea Seoul, South Korea Jamsil Arena 39 189 [26][27]

Women's competitions[edit]

Number Year Dates City and host country Venue # Countries # Athletes Ref.
1 1980 29–30 November United States New York, United States Madison Square Garden 27 149 [28][29]
2 1982 4–5 December France Paris, France Stade Pierre de Coubertin 35 174 [30][31]
3 1984 10–11 November Austria Vienna, Austria 32 183 [32][33]
4 1986 24–26 October Netherlands Maastricht, Netherlands Geusselt Sports Hall 35 162 [34][35]

Mixed competitions[edit]

Number M/W Year Dates City and host country Venue # Countries # Athletes Ref.
14/5 1987 19–22 November Germany Essen, West Germany Grugahalle 63 456 [36][37]
15/6 1989 10–15 October Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Belgrade, Yugoslavia Pionir Hall 63 355 [38][39]
16/7 1991 25–28 July Spain Barcelona, Spain Palau Blaugrana 64 465 [40][41]
17/8 1993 30 September – 3 October Canada Hamilton, Canada Copps Coliseum 79 508 [42][43]
18/9 1995 28 September – 1 October Japan Chiba, Japan Makuhari Messe 100 627 [44][45]
19/10 1997 9–12 October France Paris, France Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy 91 585 [46][47]
20/11 1999 7–10 October United Kingdom Birmingham, United Kingdom National Indoor Arena 91 619 [48][49]
21/12 2001 26–29 July Germany Munich, Germany Olympiahalle 89 586 [50][51]
22/13 2003 11–14 September Japan Osaka, Japan Osaka-jō Hall 100 631 [52][53]
23/14 2005 8–11 September Egypt Cairo, Egypt Cairo Stadium Indoor Halls Complex 93 579 [54][55]
24/15 2007 13–16 September Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil HSBC Arena 139 743 [56][57]
25/16 2009 27–30 August Netherlands Rotterdam, Netherlands Rotterdam Ahoy 197 538 [58][59]
26/17 2010 9–13 September Japan Tokyo, Japan Yoyogi National Gymnasium 112 847 [60][61]
27/18 2011 23–28 August France Paris, France Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy 131 864 [62][63]
28/19 2013 26 August – 1 September Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Maracanãzinho 123 673 [64][65]
29/20 2014 25–31 August Russia Chelyabinsk, Russia Traktor Arena 110 637 [66][67]
30/21 2015 24–30 August Kazakhstan Astana, Kazakhstan Alau Ice Palace 120 723 [68][69]
31/22 2017 28 August – 3 September Hungary Budapest, Hungary László Papp Budapest Sports Arena 126 728 [70][71]
32/23 2018 20–27 September Azerbaijan Baku, Azerbaijan National Gymnastics Arena 124 755 [72][73]
33/24 2019 25 August – 1 September Japan Tokyo, Japan Nippon Budokan 143 828 [74][75]
34/25 2021 6–13 June Hungary Budapest, Hungary László Papp Budapest Sports Arena 118 661 [76][77][78]
35/26 2022 7–14 August Uzbekistan Tashkent, Uzbekistan [79][80]
36/27 2023 TBD Qatar Doha, Qatar Ali Bin Hamad al-Attiyah Arena [81][82]
37/28 2024 TBD[a]

Openweight competitions[edit]

Number Year Dates City and host country Venue # Countries # Athletes Ref.
1 2008 20–21 December France Levallois-Perret, France Marcel Cerdan Palace of Sports 18 51 [85][86]
2009 Cancelled
2 2011 29–30 October Russia Tyumen, Russia Judo Centre 22 49 [87][88]
3 2017 11–12 November Morocco Marrakech, Morocco Palais des Congrès 28 58 [89][90]

Medal tables[edit]

Men's medal count – individual events (1956–2021)[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Japan 100 52 59 211
2  South Korea 24 8 39 71
3  France 23 17 27 67
4  Soviet Union 11 12 33 56
5  Netherlands 8 11 18 37
6  Russia 7 14 27 48
7  Georgia 5 11 19 35
8  Germany 5 6 12 23
9 Brazil Brazil 4 7 14 25
10  Poland 4 2 14 20
11  Great Britain 3 4 13 20
12  East Germany 3 3 14 20
13  Uzbekistan 3 3 7 13
14  Greece 3 2 1 6
15  Iran 3 0 5 8
16  Cuba 2 6 9 17
17  Hungary 2 5 11 18
18  Kazakhstan 2 5 3 10
19  United States 2 3 7 12
20  Mongolia 2 2 9 13
21  Spain 2 2 3 7
22  Portugal 2 0 3 5
23  Czech Republic 2 0 2 4
24  Azerbaijan 1 6 11 18
 Belgium 1 6 11 18
26  Ukraine 1 3 9 13
27  Israel 1 2 2 5
28  Austria 1 1 3 5
29  Russian Judo Federationc 1 1 1 3
 Serbia 1 1 1 3
31  Tunisia 1 0 2 3
 Yugoslavia 1 0 2 3
33  West Germany 0 5 13 18
34  Italy 0 5 9 14
35  Turkey 0 3 5 8
36  North Korea 0 3 4 7
37  Estonia 0 3 1 4
38  Canada 0 2 7 9
39  Belarus 0 2 6 8
40  Egypt 0 2 3 5
41  Czechoslovakia 0 2 2 4
42   Switzerland 0 2 1 3
43  Romania 0 1 4 5
44  Moldova 0 1 3 4
45  Bulgaria 0 1 2 3
46  Sweden 0 1 1 2
47  Algeria 0 1 0 1
 Montenegro 0 1 0 1
 Slovenia 0 1 0 1
50  China 0 0 3 3
51  United Arab Emirates 0 0 2 2
52  Armenia 0 0 1 1
 Finland 0 0 1 1
 Latvia 0 0 1 1
 Lithuania 0 0 1 1
 Tajikistan 0 0 1 1
Total 231 231 462 924

Women's medal count – individual events (1980–2021)[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Japan 49 48 49 146
2  France 32 17 48 97
3  China 20 12 14 46
4  Cuba 16 16 29 61
5  Great Britain 13 14 19 46
6  Belgium 8 9 9 26
7  Netherlands 7 11 33 51
8  Italy 5 3 8 16
9  North Korea 5 2 4 11
10  South Korea 5 1 18 24
11 Brazil Brazil 3 5 16 24
12  Germany 3 5 15 23
13  Austria 3 1 6 10
14  Colombia 3 0 3 6
15  Spain 2 8 9 19
16  West Germany 2 5 12 19
17  United States 2 5 10 17
18  Argentina 2 2 1 5
19  Poland 2 1 10 13
20  Mongolia 2 1 8 11
21  Ukraine 2 1 1 4
22  Canada 2 0 1 3
23  Slovenia 1 4 8 13
24  Israel 1 2 3 6
25  Kosovo 1 0 4 5
26  Croatia 1 0 0 1
Independent Participantsa 1 0 0 1
 Venezuela 1 0 0 1
29  Portugal 0 5 3 8
30  Russia 0 3 10 13
31  Romania 0 3 5 8
32  Australia 0 3 3 6
33  Hungary 0 2 5 7
34  Bosnia and Herzegovina 0 1 1 2
 Norway 0 1 1 2
 Puerto Rico 0 1 1 2
37  Soviet Union 0 1 0 1
 Sweden 0 1 0 1
39  Azerbaijan 0 0 3 3
 Turkey 0 0 3 3
41  Kazakhstan 0 0 2 2
  Switzerland 0 0 2 2
 Tunisia 0 0 2 2
44  Algeria 0 0 1 1
 Belarus 0 0 1 1
 Bulgaria 0 0 1 1
 Chinese Taipei 0 0 1 1
 Czech Republic 0 0 1 1
 Greece 0 0 1 1
 New Zealand 0 0 1 1
 Serbia 0 0 1 1
 Serbia and Montenegro 0 0 1 1
Total 194 194 388 776

Total medal count – individual events (1956–2021)[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Japan 149 100 108 357
2  France 55 34 75 164
3  South Korea 29 9 57 95
4  China 20 12 17 49
5  Cuba 18 22 38 78
6  Great Britain 16 18 32 66
7  Netherlands 15 22 51 88
8  Soviet Union 11 13 33 57
9  Belgium 9 15 20 44
10  Germany 8 11 27 46
11  Russia 7 17 37 61
12 Brazil Brazil 7 12 30 49
13  Poland 6 3 24 33
14  Georgia 5 11 19 35
15  Italy 5 8 17 30
16  North Korea 5 5 8 18
17  Spain 4 10 12 26
18  United States 4 8 17 29
19  Mongolia 4 3 17 24
20  Austria 4 2 9 15
21  Ukraine 3 4 10 17
22  East Germany 3 3 14 20
23  Uzbekistan 3 3 7 13
24  Greece 3 2 2 7
25  Iran 3 0 5 8
26  Colombia 3 0 3 6
27  West Germany 2 10 25 37
28  Hungary 2 7 16 25
29  Portugal 2 5 6 13
30  Kazakhstan 2 5 5 12
31  Israel 2 4 5 11
32  Canada 2 2 8 12
33  Argentina 2 2 1 5
34  Czech Republic 2 0 3 5
35  Azerbaijan 1 6 14 21
36  Slovenia 1 5 8 14
37  Serbia 1 1 2 4
38  Russian Judo Federationc 1 1 1 3
39  Kosovo 1 0 4 5
 Tunisia 1 0 4 5
41  Yugoslavia 1 0 2 3
42  Croatia 1 0 0 1
Independent Participantsa 1 0 0 1
 Venezuela 1 0 0 1
45  Romania 0 4 9 13
46  Turkey 0 3 8 11
47  Australia 0 3 3 6
48  Estonia 0 3 1 4
49  Belarus 0 2 7 9
50  Egypt 0 2 3 5
  Switzerland 0 2 3 5
52  Czechoslovakia 0 2 2 4
53  Sweden 0 2 1 3
54  Bulgaria 0 1 3 4
 Moldova 0 1 3 4
56  Algeria 0 1 1 2
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 0 1 1 2
 Norway 0 1 1 2
 Puerto Rico 0 1 1 2
60  Montenegro 0 1 0 1
61  United Arab Emirates 0 0 2 2
62  Armenia 0 0 1 1
 Chinese Taipei 0 0 1 1
 Finland 0 0 1 1
 Latvia 0 0 1 1
 Lithuania 0 0 1 1
 New Zealand 0 0 1 1
 Serbia and Montenegro 0 0 1 1
 Tajikistan 0 0 1 1
Total 425 425 850 1700

Judo Team World Championships[edit]

The World Judo Championships team competition began in 1994. women's competition began in 1997,[91] and after 1998 it was held once every four years until 2006. The competition will be held every year from 2007. Judoka who participate in the individual world championships often do not participate in the team competition.

Year Location Men Women
Gold Silver Bronze Gold Silver Bronze
1994 Paris, France  France  Germany  Japan
 Russia
no women's competition
1997 Osaka, Japan no men's competition  Cuba  South Korea  France
 Japan
1998 Minsk, Belarus  Japan  Brazil  France
 Russia
 Cuba  France  Belgium
 China
2002 Basel, Switzerland  Japan  Georgia  France
 Italy
 Japan  Cuba  China
 Italy
2006 Paris, France  Georgia  Russia  France
 South Korea
 France  Cuba  China
 Japan
2007 Beijing, China  Japan  Brazil  China
 South Korea
 China  Cuba  Japan
 Mongolia
2008 Tokyo, Japan  Georgia  Uzbekistan  Brazil
 Russia
 Japan  France  China
 Germany
2010 Antalya, Turkey  Japan  Brazil  Russia
 South Korea
 Netherlands  Germany  Japan
 Turkey
2011 Paris, France  France  Brazil  Japan
 South Korea
 France  Japan  Cuba
 Germany
2012 Salvador, Brazil  Russia  Japan  Brazil
 Georgia
 Japan  China  Brazil
 Cuba
2013 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil  Georgia  Russia  Germany
 Japan
 Japan  Brazil  Cuba
 France
2014 Chelyabinsk, Russia  Japan  Russia  Georgia
 Germany
 France  Mongolia  Germany
 Japan
2015 Astana, Kazakhstan  Japan  South Korea  Georgia
 Mongolia
 Japan  Poland  Germany
 Russia

Judo Team World Championships — Mixed team[edit]

Year Location Gold Silver Bronze
2017 Budapest, Hungary  Japan  Brazil  France
 South Korea
2018 Baku, Azerbaijan  Japan  France  Korea
 Russia
2019 Tokyo, Japan  Japan  France  Brazil
 Russia
2021 Budapest, Hungary  Japan  France  Brazil
 Uzbekistan
2022 Tashkent, Uzbekistan

Medal tables[edit]

Men's medal count – team events (1994–2015)
RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Japan61310
2 Georgia3137
3 France2035
4 Russia1348
5Brazil Brazil0426
6 South Korea0145
7 Germany0123
8 Uzbekistan0101
9 China0011
 Italy0011
 Mongolia0011
Totals (11 nations)12122448
Women's medal count – team events (1997–2015)
RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Japan51511
2 France3227
3 Cuba2338
4 China1146
5 Netherlands1001
6 Germany0145
7Brazil Brazil0112
 Mongolia0112
9 Poland0101
 South Korea0101
11 Belgium0011
 Italy0011
 Russia0011
 Turkey0011
Totals (14 nations)12122448
Mixed medal count – team events (2017–2021)
RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Japan4004
2 France0314
3Brazil Brazil0123
4 Russia0022
5 Koreab0011
 South Korea0011
 Uzbekistan0011
Totals (7 nations)44816

Total medal count – team events (1994–2021)[edit]

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Japan152825
2 France55616
3 Georgia3137
4 Cuba2338
5 Russia13711
6 China1157
7 Netherlands1001
8Brazil Brazil06511
9 Germany0268
10 South Korea0257
11 Mongolia0123
12 Uzbekistan0112
13 Poland0101
14 Italy0022
15 Belgium0011
 Koreab0011
 Turkey0011
Totals (17 nations)282856112

All-time medal count[edit]

List of World Judo Championships medalists

Updated after the 2021 World Judo Championships.

This table include all medals in the individual and team competitions won at the World Judo Championships as well as at the separate Judo Team World Championships and separate World Judo Open Championships.

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Japan164102116382
2 France603981180
3 South Korea291162102
4 China21132256
5 Cuba20254186
6 Netherlands16225189
7 Great Britain16183266
8 Soviet Union11133357
9 Belgium9152145
10 Russia8204472
11 Germany8133354
12 Georgia8122242
13Brazil Brazil7183560
14 Poland642434
15 Italy581932
16 North Korea55818
17 Spain4101226
18 United States481729
19 Mongolia441927
20 Austria42915
21 Ukraine341017
22 Uzbekistan34815
23 East Germany331420
24 Greece3227
25 Iran3058
26 Colombia3036
27 West Germany2102537
28 Hungary271625
29 Portugal25613
30 Kazakhstan25512
31 Israel24511
32 Canada22812
33 Argentina2215
34 Czech Republic2035
35 Azerbaijan161421
36 Slovenia15814
37 Serbia1124
38 Russian Judo Federationc1113
39 Kosovo1045
 Tunisia1045
41 Yugoslavia1023
42 Croatia1001
Independent Participantsa1001
 Venezuela1001
45 Romania04913
46 Turkey03912
47 Australia0336
48 Estonia0314
49 Belarus0279
50 Egypt0235
  Switzerland0235
52 Czechoslovakia0224
53 Sweden0213
54 Bulgaria0134
 Moldova0134
56 Algeria0112
 Bosnia and Herzegovina0112
 Norway0112
 Puerto Rico0112
60 Montenegro0101
61 United Arab Emirates0022
62 Armenia0011
 Chinese Taipei0011
 Finland0011
 Koreab0011
 Latvia0011
 Lithuania0011
 New Zealand0011
 Serbia and Montenegro0011
 Tajikistan0011
Totals (70 nations)4534539061812
a^ Unlike in 2013, Majlinda Kelmendi did not compete at the 2014 World Judo Championships under the Kosovo flag but under the International Judo Federation flag, as Russia does not recognise Kosovo's independence. Kosovo is the subject of a territorial dispute between the Republic of Kosovo and the Republic of Serbia. The Republic of Kosovo unilaterally declared independence on 17 February 2008. Serbia continues to claim it as part of its own sovereign territory. The two governments began to normalise relations in 2013, as part of the 2013 Brussels Agreement. Kosovo is currently recognized as an independent state by 97 out of the 193 United Nations member states. In total, 112 UN member states have recognized Kosovo at some point, of which 15 later withdrew their recognition.
b^ At the 2018 World Championships, judokas from North Korea and South Korea completed for unified Korean team and won bronze medals in the Mixed team competition.
c^ At the 2021 World Championships, in accordance with a ban by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and a decision by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), judokas from Russia were not permitted to use the Russian name, flag, or anthem. They instead participated as "the team of the Russian Judo Federation (RJF)", and used the flag of the Russian Olympic Committee.

Multiple gold medalists[edit]

Boldface denotes active judokas and highest medal count among all judokas (including these who not included in these tables) per type.

Men[edit]

Individual events[edit]

Rank Judoka Country Weights From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Teddy Riner  France +100 kg / Open 2007 2017 10 1 11
2 Naoya Ogawa  Japan +95 kg / Open 1987 1995 4 3 7
3 David Douillet  France +95 kg / Open 1993 1997 4 4
Shōzō Fujii  Japan −80 kg / −78 kg 1971 1979 4 4
Yasuhiro Yamashita  Japan +95 kg / Open 1979 1983 4 4
6 Ilias Iliadis  Greece −90 kg 2005 2014 3 2 1 6
7 Alexander Mikhaylin  Russia −100 kg / +100 kg / Open 1999 2011 3 1 3 7
8 Toshihiko Koga  Japan −71 kg / −78 kg 1987 1995 3 1 4
Naohisa Takatō  Japan −60 kg 2013 2018 3 1 4
10 Masashi Ebinuma  Japan −66 kg 2011 2014 3 3
Kōsei Inoue  Japan −100 kg 1999 2003 3 3
Jeon Ki-young  South Korea −78 kg / −86 kg 1993 1997 3 3
Shōhei Ōno  Japan −73 kg 2013 2019 3 3

All events[edit]

Rank Judoka Country Events From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Teddy Riner  France +100 kg / Open / Team 2007 2017 11 1 # 1 # # 13 #
2 Shōhei Ōno  Japan −73 kg / Team 2013 2019 * 6 * 1 * 7 *
3 Masashi Ebinuma  Japan −66 kg / Team 2011 2015 5 1 1 7
Soichi Hashimoto  Japan −73 kg / Team 2017 2021 *# 5 *# 1 1 *# 7 *#
Riki Nakaya  Japan −73 kg / Team 2011 2017 ** 5 ** 1 * 1 * *** 7 ***
6 David Douillet  France +95 kg / Open / Team 1993 1997 * 5 * * 5 *
7 Alexander Mikhaylin  Russia −100 kg / +100 kg / Open / Team 1998 2013 4 * 3 * 5 * 12 *
8 Naoya Ogawa  Japan +95 kg / Open 1987 1995 4 3 7
9 Shōzō Fujii  Japan −80 kg / −78 kg 1971 1979 4 4
Kōsei Inoue  Japan −100 kg / Team 1999 2003 4 4
Takanori Nagase  Japan −81 kg / Team 2014 2017 # 4 # # 4 #
Yasuhiro Yamashita  Japan +95 kg / Open 1979 1983 4 4

# including one medal of the Team World Championships won as reserve
* including one medal of the Team World Championships won for participation in the qualifying only
*# including one medal of the Team World Championships won for participation in the qualifying only and one won as reserve
** including two medals of the Team World Championships won for participation in the qualifying only
*** including three medals of the Team World Championships won for participation in the qualifying only

Women[edit]

Individual events[edit]

Rank Judoka Country Weights From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Ryōko Tani (Tamura)  Japan −48 kg 1991 2007 7 1 8
Tong Wen  China +78 kg / Open 2001 2011 7 1 8
3 Ingrid Berghmans  Belgium +72 kg / −72 kg / Open 1980 1989 6 4 1 11
4 Clarisse Agbegnenou  France −63 kg 2013 2021 5 2 7
5 Gao Fenglian  China +72 kg / Open 1984 1989 4 1 1 6
Kye Sun-hui  North Korea −52 kg / −57 kg 1997 2007 4 1 1 6
7 Noriko Anno  Japan +72 kg / −72 kg / −78 kg 1993 2003 4 1 5
Karen Briggs  Great Britain −48 kg 1982 1991 4 1 5
9 Driulis González  Cuba −56 kg / −57 kg / −63 kg 1993 2007 3 2 2 7
10 Sarah Asahina  Japan +78 kg / Open 2017 2021 3 1 1 5
Gévrise Émane  France −70 kg / −63 kg 2005 2015 3 1 1 5

All events[edit]

Rank Judoka Country Events From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Tong Wen  China +78 kg / Open / Team 2001 2011 8 2 10
2 Clarisse Agbegnenou  France −63 kg / Team 2011 2021 # 7 # * 3 * * 2 * **# 12 **#
3 Ryōko Tani (Tamura)  Japan −48 kg 1991 2007 7 1 8
4 Ingrid Berghmans  Belgium +72 kg / −72 kg / Open 1980 1989 6 4 1 11
5 Chizuru Arai  Japan −70 kg / Team 2015 2019 # 6 # # 6 #
6 Driulis González  Cuba −56 kg / −57 kg / −63 kg / Team 1993 2007 5 4 2 11
7 Misato Nakamura  Japan −52 kg / Team 2006 2015 5 2 1 8
8 Gévrise Émane  France −70 kg / −63 kg / Team 2005 2015 * 5 * 1 2 * 8 *
9 Noriko Anno  Japan +72 kg / −72 kg / −78 kg / Team 1993 2003 5 1 1 7
Sarah Asahina  Japan +78 kg / Open / Team 2017 2021 5 1 1 7

# including one medal of the Team World Championships won as reserve
* including one medal of the Team World Championships won for participation in the qualifying only
*# including one medal of the Team World Championships won for participation in the qualifying only and one won as reserve
**# including two medals of the Team World Championships won for participation in the qualifying only and one won as reserve

Records[edit]

Category Men Women
Youngest world champion
Oldest world champion

Video footage[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1956 World Championships". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  2. ^ "1956 World Championships". JudoInside.com. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  3. ^ "1958 World Championships". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  4. ^ "1958 World Championships". JudoInside.com. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  5. ^ "1961 World Championships". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  6. ^ "1961 World Championships". JudoInside.com. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  7. ^ "1965 World Championships". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  8. ^ "1965 World Championships". JudoInside.com. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  9. ^ "1967 World Championships". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  10. ^ "1967 World Championships". JudoInside.com. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  11. ^ "1969 World Championships". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  12. ^ "1969 World Championships". JudoInside.com. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  13. ^ "1971 World Championships". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  14. ^ "1971 World Championships". JudoInside.com. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  15. ^ "1973 World Championships". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  16. ^ "1973 World Championships". JudoInside.com. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  17. ^ "1975 World Championships". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  18. ^ "1975 World Championships". JudoInside.com. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  19. ^ The 1977 Championships were canceled due to the refusal of the host country officials to allow the Taiwanese national team to compete under the national flag of the Republic of China, they were denied visas. Taiwan appealed the decision of the Spanish officials to the International Judo Federation, IJF officials considered the position of the Taiwanese side to be fair and decided to cancel the 1977 Championships due to a unresolved political conflict.
  20. ^ "1979 World Championships". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
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