Women's pole vault world record progression

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The first world record in the women's pole vault was recognised by the International Association of Athletics Federations in 1994. The inaugural record, 4.05 metres by Sun Caiyun of China set in 1992, was the world's best mark as of December 31, 1994.[1]

As of June 21, 2009, the IAAF has ratified 54 world records in the event.[2]

IAAF Record Progression[edit]

Record Athlete Nation Venue Date #[3]
4.05 m (13 ft 314 in)[2] Sun Caiyun  China Nanjing, China 21 May 1992 1
4.08 m (13 ft 412 in)[2] Sun Caiyun  China Taiyuan, China 18 May 1995 2
4.08 m (13 ft 412 in)[2] Zhong Guiqing  China Taiyuan, China 18 May 1995 1
4.10 m (13 ft 514 in)[2] Daniela Bártová  Czech Republic Ljubljana, Slovenia 21 May 1995 1
4.12 m (13 ft 6 in)[2] Daniela Bártová  Czech Republic Duisburg, Germany 18 June 1995 2
4.13 m (13 ft 612 in)[2] Daniela Bártová  Czech Republic Wesel, Germany 24 June 1995 3
4.14 m (13 ft 634 in)[2] Daniela Bártová  Czech Republic Gateshead, England 2 July 1995 4
4.15 m (13 ft 714 in)[2] Daniela Bártová  Czech Republic Ostrava, Czech Republic 6 July 1995 5
4.16 m (13 ft 734 in)[2] Daniela Bártová  Czech Republic Feldkirch, Austria 14 July 1995 6
4.17 m (13 ft 8 in)[2] Daniela Bártová  Czech Republic Feldkirch, Austria 15 July 1995 7
4.18 m (13 ft 812 in)[2] Andrea Müller  Germany Zittau, Germany 5 August 1995 1
4.20 m (13 ft 914 in)[2] Daniela Bártová  Czech Republic Köln, Germany 18 August 1995 8
4.21 m (13 ft 912 in)[2] Daniela Bártová  Czech Republic Linz, Austria 22 August 1995 9
4.22 m (13 ft 10 in)[2] Daniela Bártová  Czech Republic Salgótarján, Hungary 11 September 1995 10
4.25 m (13 ft 1114 in)[2] Emma George  Australia Melbourne, Australia 30 November 1995 1
4.28 m (14 ft 012 in)[2] Emma George  Australia Perth, Australia 17 December 1995 2
4.41 m (14 ft 512 in)[2] Emma George  Australia Perth, Australia 28 January 1996 3
4.42 m (14 ft 6 in)[2] Emma George  Australia Reims, France 29 June 1996 4
4.45 m (14 ft 7 in)[2] Emma George  Australia Sapporo, Japan 14 July 1996 5
4.50 m (14 ft 9 in)[2] Emma George  Australia Melbourne, Australia 8 February 1997 6
4.55 m (14 ft 11 in)[2] Emma George  Australia Melbourne, Australia 20 February 1997 7
4.57 m (14 ft 1134 in)[2] Emma George  Australia Auckland, New Zealand 21 February 1998 8
4.58 m (15 ft 014 in)[2] Emma George  Australia Melbourne, Australia 14 March 1998 9
4.59 m (15 ft 012 in)[2] Emma George  Australia Brisbane, Australia 21 March 1998 10
4.60 m (15 ft 1 in)[2] Emma George  Australia Sydney, Australia 20 February 1999 11
4.60 m (15 ft 1 in)[2] Stacy Dragila  United States Sevilla, Spain 21 August 1999 1
i 4.60 m (15 ft 1 in)[2][4] Stacy Dragila  United States Pocatello, U.S. 19 Feb 2000 2
i 4.62 m (15 ft 134 in)[2][4] Stacy Dragila  United States Atlanta, U.S. 3 Mar 2000 3
4.63 m (15 ft 214 in)[2] Stacy Dragila  United States Sacramento, U.S. 23 July 2000 4
i 4.63 m (15 ft 214 in)[2][4] Stacy Dragila  United States New York City, U.S. 2 Feb 2001 5
i 4.64 m (15 ft 212 in) [2][4] Svetlana Feofanova  Russia Dortmund, Germany 11 February 2001 1
i 4.66 m (15 ft 314 in) [2][4] Stacy Dragila  United States Pocatello, U.S. 17 Feb 2001 6
i 4.70 m (15 ft 5 in) [2][4] Stacy Dragila  United States Pocatello, U.S. 17 Feb 2001 7
4.70 m (15 ft 5 in)[2] Stacy Dragila  United States Pocatello, U.S. 27 April 2001 8
4.71 m (15 ft 514 in)[2] Stacy Dragila  United States Palo Alto, U.S. 9 June 2001 9
4.81 m (15 ft 914 in)[2] Stacy Dragila  United States Palo Alto, U.S. 9 June 2001 10
4.82 m (15 ft 934 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Gateshead, England 13 July 2003 1
i 4.83 m (15 ft 10 in)[2][4] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Donets'k, Ukraine 15 February 2004 2
i 4.85 m (15 ft 1034 in)[2][4] Svetlana Feofanova[5]  Russia Athens, Greece 22 February 2004 2
i 4.86 m (15 ft 1114 in)[2][4] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Budapest, Hungary 6 March 2004 3
4.87 m (15 ft 1112 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Gateshead, England 27 June 2004 4
4.88 m (16 ft 0 in)[2] Svetlana Feofanova  Russia Heraklion, Greece 4 July 2004 3
4.89 m (16 ft 012 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Birmingham, England 25 July 2004 5
4.90 m (16 ft 034 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia London, England 30 July 2004 6
4.91 m (16 ft 114 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Athens, Greece 24 August 2004 7
4.92 m (16 ft 112 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Brussels, Belgium 3 September 2004 8
4.93 m (16 ft 2 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Lausanne, Switzerland 5 July 2005 9
4.95 m (16 ft 234 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Madrid, Spain 16 July 2005 10
4.96 m (16 ft 314 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia London, England 22 July 2005 11
5.00 m (16 ft 434 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia London, England 22 July 2005 12
5.01 m (16 ft 5 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Helsinki, Finland 9 August 2005 13
5.03 m (16 ft 6 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Rome, Italy 11 July 2008 14
5.04 m (16 ft 614 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Fontvieille, Monaco 29 July 2008 15
5.05 m (16 ft 634 in)[2] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Beijing, China 18 August 2008 16
5.06 m (16 ft 7 in)[6] Yelena Isinbayeva  Russia Zürich, Switzerland 28 August 2009 17

Pre-IAAF Record Progression[edit]

The first mark shows the measurement system in use at the time of the jump, the second mark shows the conversion. Marks set in the USA during this era were always measured in imperial measurements. Most of the world and IAAF recognize marks in metric measurements.

Record Athlete Nation Venue Date #[3]
4 ft 9 in (1.44 m)[1] Ruth Spencer  United States Painesville 14 May 1910
4 ft 10 in (1.47 m)[1] Ruth Spencer  United States Painesville 15 May 1911
4 ft 11 in (1.49 m)[1] Ruth Spencer  United States Painesville 15 May 1911
5 ft 1 in (1.54 m)[1] Ruth Spencer  United States Painesville 15 May 1911
5 ft 2 in (1.57 m)[1] Ruth Spencer  United States Painesville 15 May 1911
5 ft 3 in (1.6 m)[1] Ruth Spencer  United States Painesville 15 May 1911
5 ft 4 in (1.62 m)[1] Ruth Spencer  United States Painesville 15 May 1911
5 ft 5 in (1.65 m)[1] Ruth Spencer  United States Painesville 15 May 1911
5 ft 6 in (1.67 m)[1] Ruth Spencer  United States Painesville 15 May 1911
5 ft 7 in (1.7 m)[1] Ruth Spencer  United States Painesville 15 May 1911
5 ft 734 in (1.72 m)[7] Ruth Spencer  United States Painesville 15 May 1911
5 ft 8 in (1.72 m)[1] Hazel Hutaff  United States Rock Hill 3 April 1915
5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)[1] Hazel Hutaff  United States Rock Hill 3 April 1915
5 ft 934 in (1.77 m)[7] Hazel Hutaff  United States Rock Hill 3 April 1915
5 ft 10 in (1.77 m)[1] Lois Tatum  United States Tallahassee 13 April 1915
=5 ft 10 in (1.77 m)[1] Emma Lee King  United States Tallahassee 13 April 1915
6 ft 012 in (1.84 m)[7] Lois Tatum  United States Tallahassee 13 April 1915
=6 ft 012 in (1.84 m)[1] Eva Fisk  United States Lincoln 13 May 1915
6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)[1] Eva Fisk  United States Lincoln 13 May 1915
6 ft 3 in (1.9 m)[1] Eva Fisk  United States Lincoln 13 May 1915
=6 ft 3 in (1.9 m)[1] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 6 June 1915
6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)[1] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 6 June 1915
6 ft 5 in (1.95 m)[1] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 6 June 1915
6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)[1] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 6 June 1915
6 ft 7 in (2 m)[1] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 6 June 1915
6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)[1] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 6 June 1915
6 ft 9 in (2.05 m)[1] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 6 June 1915
6 ft 10 in (2.08 m)[1] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 6 June 1915
6 ft 11 in (2.1 m)[1] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 6 June 1915
7 ft 0 in (2.13 m)[7] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 6 June 1915
7 ft 1 in (2.15 m)[1] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 6 June 1915
7 ft 2 in (2.18 m)[7] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 6 June 1915
7 ft 3 in (2.2 m)[7] Mildred Carl  United States New Haven 3 June 1919
2.25 m (7 ft 412 in)[1] Elva Hintze  Germany Nürnberg 17 July 1921
2.30 m (7 ft 612 in)[1] Helene Henneke  Germany Nürnberg 17 July 1921
2.35 m (7 ft 812 in)[7] Helene Henneke  Germany Nürnberg 17 July 1921
=2.35 m (7 ft 812 in)[7] Yelena Goldobina  Soviet Union Moskva 7 September 1924
2.53 m (8 ft 312 in)[7] Zoya Romanova  Soviet Union Moskva 26 August 1935
8 ft 6 in (2.59 m)[7] Diane Bragg  United States Philadelphia 6 July 1952
=8 ft 6 in (2.59 m)[7] Brenda Walker  New Zealand Wairoa 8 Jan 1969
8 ft 612 in (2.6 m) i[1] Irene Spieker  United States Louisville 10 February 1978
8 ft 7 in (2.61 m) i[1]> Irene Spieker  United States Louisville 9 February 1979
9 ft 0 in (2.74 m) i[1]> Irene Spieker  United States Louisville 9 February 1979
9 ft 7 in (2.92 m) i[1]> Irene Spieker  United States Louisville 9 February 1979
10 ft 014 in (3.05 m) i[1]> Irene Spieker  United States Louisville 9 February 1979
10 ft 014 in (3.05 m)[7] Jana Edwards  United States * June 1983
10 ft 6 in (3.2 m)[7] Jana Edwards  United States Chicago 11 June 1983
10 ft 7 in (3.22 m)[7] Jana Edwards  United States Cleveland 18 June 1983
11 ft 1 in (3.37 m)[7] Jana Edwards  United States Cleveland 18 June 1983
11 ft 6 in (3.5 m)[7] Jana Edwards  United States Fort Wayne 23 July 1983
11 ft 912 in (3.59 m)[7] Jana Edwards  United States Fort Wayne 23 July 1983
3.72 m (12 ft 214 in)[7] Zhang Chunzhen  China Guangzhou 20 April 1988
3.73 m (12 ft 234 in)[7] Shao Jingmen  China Guangzhou 4 May 1988
3.75 m (12 ft 312 in)[7] Zhang Chunzhen  China Nanjing 10 June 1988
3.76 m (12 ft 4 in)[7] Zhou Minxin  China Fuzhou 22 April 1989
3.8 m (12 ft 512 in)[7] Zhang Chunzhen  China Guangzhou 9 September 1989
3.81 m (12 ft 6 in)[7] Zhang Chunzhen  China Guangzhou 24 March 1990
3.83 m (12 ft 634 in)[7] Sun Caiyun  China Guangzhou 24 March 1991
=3.83 m (12 ft 634 in)[7] Zhang Chunzhen  China Guangzhou 24 March 1991
4.00 m (13 ft 114 in)[7] Zhang Chunzhen  China Guangzhou 24 March 1991
4.02 m (13 ft 214 in)[7] Zhang Chunzhen  China Beijing 5 June 1991
4.05 m (13 ft 314 in)[7] Zhang Chunzhen  China Guangzhou 10 August 1991

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai http://iaaf-ebooks.s3.amazonaws.com/2015/Progression-of-IAAF-World-Records-2015/projet/IAAF-WRPB-2015.pdf P314
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc "12th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Berlin 2009." (PDF). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2009. pp. Pages 546, 645. Archived from the original (pdf) on June 29, 2011. Retrieved July 30, 2009. 
  3. ^ a b The numbered occurrence of the athlete breaking the world record, in other words "#7" would indicate the 7th time the athlete broke the world record.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i "From 2000, IAAF Rule 260.18s (formerly 260.6.a) was amended to say world records (as opposed to indoor world records) can be set in a facility 'with or without a roof.' So far, only one event - the women's pole vault - has been affected by this change, which was not applied retrospectively. Therefore world records set in 2000 and 2001 by Stacy Dragila and Svetlana Feofanova can be regarded as 'absolute' and appear on these [record progression] lists." [1] (p.546) This rule also applies to Isinbayev's and Feofanova's 2004 marks.
  5. ^ The IAAF lists Yelena Isinbayeva as having set this mark on 20 February 2004 on their 2009-published progression lists. However, multiple sources elsewhere, including the IAAF's own list of highest women's indoor vaults of the year 2004,[2] state that Svetlana Feofanova in fact set this record.
  6. ^ "World Records Ratified". Retrieved November 9, 2009. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab http://www.polevaultpower.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1960