World Skate

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World Skate
World Skate logo.png
SportRoller sports
JurisdictionInternational
AbbreviationWS
Founded21 April 1924 (1924-04-21)
AffiliationInternational Olympic Committee
Affiliation dateSeptember 2017[1]
HeadquartersLausanne, Vaud, Switzerland
PresidentSabatino Aracu
Vice president(s)
  • Fernando Elias Claro
  • Alberto Herrera Ayala
  • Guoyong Liu
  • Karen Doyle
  • Nathanael Koty
SecretaryRoberto Marotta
ReplacedInternational Skateboarding Federation
Official website
www.worldskate.org

World Skate is the International Olympic Committee (IOC) recognised organisational body for roller sports. The organisation is the successor of the Fédération Internationale de Roller Sports (FIRS) and was formed via the merger of the FIRS and the International Skateboarding Federation (ISF) in September 2017, after FIRS was selected by the IOC as the world governing body of skateboarding in preparation for the scheduled skateboarding events at the Japan 2020 Olympics.[2][3]

Disciplines[edit]

World Skate serves as the international governing body for:

History[edit]

World Skate was established as the Fédération Internationale de Patinage a Roulettes (FIPR) on 21 April 1924 as an organ for creating multinational European championship tournaments for roller sports. The founding meeting was organized by Fred Renkewitz and Otto Myer and included representatives from France, Germany, Great Britain, and Switzerland. Renkewitz served as president of the FIPR from its founding in 1924 until 1960.

The FIPR began organizing World Championship events in the later 1930s, with the first Rink Hockey World Championship hosted in Stuttgart in 1936. The inaugural Speed Skating World Championship was held in 1937–38, with events in Monza, Italy; London, United Kingdom; and Ferrara, Italy. After a pause to all sport competition during World War II, the World Championships resumed in 1947 and the first Artistic Skating World Championship was held in Washington, D.C., United States.

During the 1960s, the organization was recognized by the International Olympic Committee and the governing body for all roller skating sports and renamed as the Fédération Internationale de Roller Skating (FIRS). It gained member status in the General Association of International Sports Federations (GAISF) in the 1970s.

Artistic skating, rink hockey, and speed skating remained the principal sports regulated by FIRS until inline hockey was included in the 1990s, with the first Inline Hockey World Championship held in 1995. At the FIRS Congress in 2000, a vote approved the modification of the name from Fédération Internationale de Roller Skating to Fédération Internationale de Roller Sports; the FIRS acronym remained unchanged.[5]

The FIRS continued to expand the scope of its governance to additional roller sport disciplines and, by 2017, it served as the governing body of ten sports. The inaugural World Roller Games in 2017 served as the world championship for all ten of the FIRS' governed sports, merging the various world championship tournaments into a two week skating event hosted in Nanjing, China. The second World Roller Games were held in 2019 in Barcelona, Spain.

The FIRS rebranded as World Skate after merging with the International Skateboarding Federation (ISF) in June 2017.[3] Along with the rebrand, the World Roller Games were renamed the World Skate Games. The 2022 World Skate Games in Argentina will be the first edition to utilize the new name.[6]

Competitions[edit]

World Skate Games[edit]

Since 2017, World Skate has organized the bi-annual World Skate Games, comprising all roller sport disciplines governed by World Skate.[7]

The World Skate Games are a multi-sport event that serves as the World Championship of eleven disciplines: alpine, artistic, inline downhill, inline freestyle, inline hockey, rink hockey, roller derby, roller freestyle, scooter, skateboard, and speed.[8]

The first edition of the event was hosted in Nanjing, China during September 2017 as the 'World Roller Games.' Over 3,000 athletes, 193 national teams, and 61 national federations participated in the fifteen-day festival, which named world champions in ten sports.

The second edition of the World Roller Games attracted more than 4,000 athletes to Barcelona, Spain during July 2019. Seventy-six national federations participated in eleven sports.

The third edition of the event – the first to be contested under the rebranded 'World Skate Games' moniker – was originally scheduled to take place in during October and November 2021 in the host cities of Vicente López, Buenos Aires and San Juan, Argentina.[6] It was later announced that the Games would be postponed until 2022 due to scheduling conflicts caused by the COVID-19 pandemic but were expected to be hosted in Argentina as originally planned.[9]

Olympic Games[edit]

In 1992, roller hockey was played at the 1992 Summer Olympics as a demonstration sport.

Skateboarding events have been introduced for the 2020 Summer Olympics, with two events: park and street. Much like BMX cycling, the park event will feature what resembles an empty swimming pool.[10] Competitors will have three timed runs for tricks. On street, there will be ramps and rails for routines and tricks. A total of 80 spots will be available, with a maximum of 20 competitors per event. Each country may enter up to three athletes in each event.[11]

Youth Olympic Games[edit]

Roller sport made its debut at the Youth Olympic Games in 2018, in which two roller speed skating events were added as medal sports.

World Games[edit]

Roller sports have been represented at the World Games since the first games, held in 1981. Both artistic skating and inline speed skating track have been featured at every holding of the Games, and either roller hockey or inline hockey has been featured at all but the 1997 World Games.

The International World Games Association (IWGA) announced on 16 April 2018 that four roller sports would be included in the 30 official sports competing for gold at the 2021 World Games, during 15–25 June in Birmingham, Alabama. Birmingham marks the 40th anniversary of the event which will feature 3,600 athletes from more than 100 countries. This the first time the World Games has returned to the United States since 1981.[12]

On the programme for the 2021 World Games are four roller sports disciplines; artistic skating, inline hockey, and two speed skating types, road and track. Roller sport is the only sport-type on the World Games programme to be represented in three separate clusters, with speed skating categorized with "Trend Sports," artistic skating with "Artistic Sports," and inline hockey with "Ball Sports."[13]

World Urban Games[edit]

World Championships[edit]

Regional events[edit]

Single-sport events[edit]

Multi-sport events[edit]

In May 2019, Panam Sports announced that skateboarding had been removed from the roller sports program for the 2019 Pan American Games in Lima because World Skate could not guarantee that the best possible athletes would be in attendance. World Skate had scheduled a World Tour event with dates that overlapped with the Pan American Games. Tensions between the organizations were already high, as World Skate had refused to authorize the competition as an Olympic qualifier.[14]

Continental Areas[edit]

World Skate comprises five continental areas, each involved in organising their own regional competitions:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Olympic Sport: World Skate". International Olympic Committee. 5 August 2020. Retrieved 15 October 2020.
  2. ^ "Further steps taken as excitement builds for skateboarding's Olympic debut at Tokyo 2020". International Olympic Committee. 30 September 2019. Retrieved 14 October 2020.
  3. ^ a b Pavitt, Michael (15 June 2017). "FIRS and ISF to merge into World Skate to aid development and management of skateboarding". Inside the Games. Retrieved 1 May 2021.
  4. ^ Arguimbau-Boatto, Priscillia (3 July 2020). "Interview with Elisabet Martin Mora, vice-president of WIFSA". online-skating.com. Retrieved 15 October 2020.
  5. ^ Paolo, Federico Di. "About World Skate". World Skate. Retrieved 1 May 2021.
  6. ^ a b Mercuri, Simona (6 May 2019). "Argentina will host the 2021 World Skate Games". World Skate. Retrieved 1 May 2021.
  7. ^ "World Roller Games 2019". WRG2019. Retrieved 16 August 2019.
  8. ^ "Disciplines". World Roller Games 2019. Retrieved 16 August 2019.
  9. ^ Houston, Michael (25 July 2020). "World Skate Games postponed until 2022 due to scheduling conflicts". Inside the Games. Retrieved 1 May 2021.
  10. ^ "Sports: Skateboarding". Tokyo 2020. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  11. ^ Kostka, Andy (24 July 2019). "10 things to know about new sports and events at 2020 Olympics". USA Today. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  12. ^ "IWGA announce participating sports for world games 2021". The World Games 2021. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  13. ^ "Roller Sports". The World Games. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  14. ^ Morgan, Liam (16 May 2019). "Skateboarding axed from Lima 2019 Pan American Games programme". InsidetheGames.biz. Retrieved 26 September 2019.

External links[edit]