World of Commodore

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World of Commodore
World of Commodore logo.jpg
Status Active
Genre Consumer electronics
Country
  • Canada
  • United States
  • United Kingdom
  • Germany
  • Australia
Inaugurated 1983
Attendance 38,000 (1983)[1]
42,000 (1987)[2]
43,300 (1988)[2]
100,000 (1992)[3]
Website worldofcommodore.ca

World of Commodore is an annual computer expo dedicated to Commodore computers.

The shows were initially organized by Commodore Canada or its sister companies, and took place at the International Centre in Mississauga, Ontario, though in some years additional expos were held in the United States, Australia, or Europe. The expos were among the largest in the computing industry, with attendance at some events reaching 100,000.[3] As with cross-industry trade shows such as CES and COMDEX, World of Commodore expos were widely reported on in computing magazines.

With the decline of its 8-bit product line and the rise of the Amiga, Commodore began branding some of the expos as World of Commodore/Amiga. The name was changed to World of Amiga following Commodore's bankruptcy in 1994 and purchase by German PC conglomerate Escom the following year. The Amiga expos continued until 2002. In 2004, the original exhibition series was revived by the Toronto PET Users Group.[4] As of 2016 World of Commodore continues under TPUG's aegis, albeit on a scale much reduced since the expo's heyday.[5][6]

Show highlights[edit]

1983[edit]

The first World of Commodore was organized by Commodore Canada[7] and held at the International Centre in Mississauga, Ontario from 8 to 11 December 1983.[8] Over 70 exhibitors from around the world signed on to debut and demonstrate their Commodore-compatible software and hardware.[8] Despite the unexpected absence of some exhibitors, the convention was a phenomenal success, with 38,000 visitors attending; attendance on the show's final day was the highest in the history of the International Centre.[1]

The show was emceed by TVOntario's Jack Livesley, and featured seminars by Jim Butterfield and others. Exhibitors included Batteries Included; Bell Canada; Commodore Business Machines; Commodore Power/Play; Holt, Rinehart, and Winston; Koala Technologies; Micron Technology; the Toronto PET Users Group (TPUG); and The Transactor.[1][9]

1984[edit]

World of Commodore II was held from 29 November to 2 December 1984 at the International Centre in Mississauga and attracted 41,516 visitors.[10][11] Commodore held off on launching their 16-bit product line, instead concentrating their large display on the Plus/4 and Commodore 16.[11] Speakers included David Berman and Jim Butterfield, and exhibitors included the COMAL Users' Group; Commodore Business Machines; Currah; Grolier; Holt, Rinehart, and Winston; Houghton Mifflin; Mastertronic; TPUG; The Transactor; Vaisala; and Watcom.[10]

1985[edit]

The third annual World of Commodore expo was held at the International Centre in Mississauga from 5 to 8 December 1985. The show was notable for three major product launches by Commodore: the Commodore 128, the Amiga, and the Commodore PC-10 and PC-20 PC-compatible systems.[12]

The expo also hosted the usual slate of seminars, with presentations by Commodore, Digital Solutions, TPUG, Jim Butterfield, Steve Punter, and others. Industry exhibitors included Abacus Software, Ahoy!, Commodore Business Machines, Digital Solutions, Electronic Arts, Gold Disk, Grolier, McGraw-Hill Ryerson, TPUG, Watcom, and WordPro distributor Norland Agencies.[12]

1986[edit]

The fourth World of Commodore was held the first week of December 1986 at the International Centre in Mississauga. All major Amiga software companies were present, with the notable exception of game developers such as Electronic Arts. Hardware developers and vendors were out in force, with Mimetics demoing a Deluxe Music Construction Set–compatible MIDI sequencer, and Xetec presenting its SCSI interfaces and hard drives. Commodore itself used the show to launch its Amiga Sidecar and to announce its forthcoming genlock card.[13]

The computing press was represented by The Transactor, Amiga World, and RUN. Notable personages in attendance included author Jim Butterfield, Commodore engineer Dave Haynie, and sysops from Commodore-related forums on The Source and CompuServe.[13]

1987[edit]

World of Commodore 1987 was held at the International Centre in Mississauga. There were over 85 exhibitors, including TPUG, Ahoy!, Electronic Arts, The Transactor, NewTek, Supra, Inc., Gold Disk, Xetec, and Commodore itself.[7][14][15] The show's major focus was on the Amiga 1000, Amiga 500, and Amiga 2000, with comparatively few offerings for Commodore's 8-bit and PC-compatible lines.[15]

Commodore demoed the A2300 Genlock and the PVA, two new genlock cards for the Amiga 2000, and announced two new PC-compatible systems: the PC 10-III, a 9.54 MHz XT clone, and the PC-60, a 386-based machine running XENIX.[14][15] New productivity software exhibited at the show included Berkeley Softworks's geoPublish, Electronic Arts's PaperClip III and Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing, and NewTek's Video Toaster.[15] New games for the Commodore 64 and 128 came mostly from Electronic Arts, and included Halls of Montezuma, Bard's Tale III, Skyfox II, Strike Fleet, and Skate or Die.[15] New Amiga software demoed or announced included Arkanoid, Bard's Tale II, Reach for the Stars, Thexder, Space Quest II, Police Quest, The Hunt for Red October, and WordPerfect.[7][15]

Seminars were presented by Jim Butterfield, Steve Punter, Fred Fish, and others.[14] The expo achieved record attendance of 42,000.[2]

1988[edit]

1988 marked the first time that two World of Commodore expos were held: one in November at the Philadelphia Civic Center,[16] and the other in December in Toronto.

Attendance at the Toronto expo was over 43,300, surpassing the record set the previous year. As in 1987, the Amiga dominated all aspects of the show.[2] Exhibitors included Ion Publishing, publishers of Ahoy! and AmigaUser.[2]

At the US show ReadySoft demonstrated AMAX, a Macintosh emulator for the Amiga.[citation needed]

In September, 1988 a World Of Commodore expo was held at the newly opened Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour, Sydney, Australia.

1989[edit]

Three World of Commodore shows were held in 1989: the original Canadian edition was held from 30 November to 4 December in Toronto, an American East Coast edition was held from 22 to 24 September in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, and an American West Coast edition took place at the Los Angeles Convention Center from 19 to 21 May.[16]

The Los Angeles show saw exhibits and announcements from Commodore, NewTek, MicroIllusions, Xetec, Amiga World, and Canon Inc..[17]

1990[edit]

Beginning in 1990, the expo was rebranded World of Commodore Amiga. The show was noted for Commodore's announcement and early demo of the Commodore CDTV. Third-party exhibitors included Walt Disney Computer Software, Amazing Computing, RUN, Xetec, Abacus, Creative Micro Designs, Gold Disk, Sierra On-Line, Kawai Musical Instruments, and COMPUTE! Publications.[18]

1991[edit]

A World of Commodore was held at Earls Court Exhibition Centre in London from 14 to 17 November 1991, and a World of Commodore Amiga took place at the Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre in Australia from 12 to 14 July 1991. At these shows Commodore launched its CDTV multimedia platform.[19][20] The London show was supported by companies such as Electronic Arts, Psygnosis, and Ocean.[20]

1992[edit]

World of Commodore 1992 was held in Pasadena, California in September 1992; attendance was estimated at nearly 20,000.[21] Commodore used the event to introduce the Amiga 4000, the Amiga 600 and Amiga 600HD, AmigaDOS 3.0, and the A570 CD-ROM drive for the Amiga 500.[21][22] Commodore also presented "Father of the Amiga" Jay Miner with one of the very first Amiga 4000s.[21] Third-party exhibitors releasing and demonstrating new products included SAS Institute, Scala, Inc., Gold Disk, and Digital Creations.[21]

A World of Commodore/Amiga 1992 took place at the Frankfurt Trade Fair grounds in Frankfurt am Main, Germany from 26 to 29 November 1992.[3] The expo was colocated with the Amiga '92 show; there were around 150 exhibitors and visitor attendance was expected to reach 100,000.[3][23] Though the expo included a special anniversary celebration for the Commodore 64, only a very small minority of exhibitors and visitors were 8-bit computer users.[23]

1993[edit]

World of Commodore and World of Commodore/Amiga expos were held in several locations in 1993, including New York City;[24][25] Sydney, Australia;[26] Pasadena, California;[27] Cologne, Germany;[28] and Mississauga, Ontario.

The New York show was well attended and featured 30 exhibitors, many of which were mail order companies.[29] Commodore displayed a prototype of its new Amiga 4000 tower model, and wowed visitors with a demonstration of full-screen 30 FPS MPEG video on a stock Amiga 4000/030.[29]

The Australian expo featured exhibits by Amazing Computing, Amiga Format, Commodore, and Mindscape.[26]

At the Pasadena show, Commodore US President Jim Dionne outlined his plans for Amiga CD32 sales to bring the company back into profit. Commodore also announced the impending release of AmigaDOS 3.1, the aforementioned Amiga 4000 tower model, and CD32-compatible CD-ROM drives for the Amiga 4000 and Amiga 1200.[27]

The World of Commodore in Cologne took place from 5 to 7 November 1993. It featured over 150 companies and had a Saturday attendance of over 50,000. Contrary to expectations, Commodore did not launch the Amiga 4000 tower model, but heavily promoted the CD32 with about 60 demonstrator models. The highlight of the show was COME Corporate Media's Photo CD system.[28]

1995[edit]

Commodore declared bankruptcy in 1994, and the following year its assets were purchased by the German PC conglomerate Escom. Escom took over organization of the World of Commodore exhibitions, rebranding them World of Amiga. Its first World of Amiga expo was held at the International Centre in Mississauga in December 1995. The show featured Escom's new subsidiary Amiga Technologies, as well as 30 other hardware and software exhibitors.[30] The show was criticized for exhibitors' focus on sales rather than demonstrations and product launches. Among the few new products released was Idruna Software's Photogenics.[31]

2004[edit]

In 2004, the defunct World of Commodore expo was revived by the Toronto PET Users Group.[4][6] The event was held at the Belaire Hotel in Toronto on 4 December, and featured talks and demos by Jim Butterfield, Jim Brain, Jeri Ellsworth, former Transactor editor Karl J. H. Hildon, Commodore Canada vice president Ron Anderson, and a representative of Commodore trademark holders Tulip Computers.[4][32]

2006[edit]

World of Commodore 2006 was held at the Alderwood United Church in Toronto on 2 December. It featured screenings of the TVOntario series Bits and Bytes,[6] a guest talk by C64 Direct-to-TV designer Jeri Ellsworth,[33] and the final World of Commodore appearance by author Jim Butterfield.[34] Though attendance was just 75, the expo attracted coverage from news outlets such as The Globe and Mail and The Toronto Star.[6][35]

2007[edit]

Toronto's Alderwood United Church was the venue for TPUG's World of Commodore 2007. The event, held on 1 December 2007, featured several tributes to Commodore pioneer Jim Butterfield, who had died of cancer earlier that year.[36]

2012[edit]

World of Commodore 2012 was organized by TPUG and held at the Admiral Inn in Mississauga, Ontario on 1 December 2012.[37] Independent game developer Comma 8 Studios announced M.U.L.E. Returns, a licensed remake of the 1983 classic M.U.L.E. slated for release in 2013.[38]

2013[edit]

World of Commodore 2013 was organized by TPUG and held at the Admiral Inn in Mississauga, Ontario on 7 December.[39] The event hosted Comma 8 Studios's launch of M.U.L.E. Returns, the iOS remake of M.U.L.E. which had been announced at the previous World of Commodore expo.[39]

Timeline[edit]

Name Date Venue Notes
World of Commodore 8–11 December 1983 International Centre, Mississauga, Ontario [8]
World of Commodore II 29 November–2 December 1984 International Centre, Mississauga, Ontario [10]
World of Commodore III 5–8 December 1985 International Centre, Mississauga, Ontario [12]
World of Commodore IV 4–7 December 1986 International Centre, Mississauga, Ontario [13][40]
World of Commodore V December 1987 International Centre, Mississauga, Ontario [7][14]
World of Commodore 1988 (US) 3 November 1988 Philadelphia Convention Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania [16]
World of Commodore 1988 1 December 1988 Toronto, Ontario [citation needed]
World of Commodore 1989 (US West Coast) 19–21 May 1989 Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, California [16]
World of Commodore 1989 (US East Coast) 22–24 September 1989 Valley Forge, Pennsylvania [41][42]
World of Commodore 1989 30 November–4 December 1989 International Centre, Mississauga, Ontario [41]
World of Commodore Amiga 1990 30 November–2 December 1990 International Centre, Mississauga, Ontario [18]
World of Commodore 1991 14–17 November 1991 Earls Court Exhibition Centre, London, United Kingdom [43]
World of Commodore Amiga 1991 12–14 July 1991 Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, Sydney, Australia [20]
World of Commodore 1992 (US) 10–13 September 1992 Pasadena, California [22]
World of Commodore/Amiga 1992 26–29 November 1992 Messe Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany [3][23]
World of Commodore 1992 1992 International Centre, Mississauga, Ontario [44]
World of Commodore/Amiga 1993 (US) 24–26 April 1993 Pier 88, New York Passenger Ship Terminal, New York, New York [24][25]
World of Commodore/Amiga 1993 (Australia) 2–4 July 1993 Darling Harbour, Sydney, Australia [26]
World of Commodore 1993 (US) 10–13 September 1993 Pasadena, California [26]
World of Commodore 1993 3–5 November 1993 International Centre, Mississauga, Ontario [citation needed]
World of Commodore 1993 (Germany) 5–7 November 1993 Cologne, Germany [28]
World of Amiga Toronto 1995 8–10 December 1995 International Centre, Mississauga, Ontario [30]
World of Commodore 2004 3–5 December 2004 Belaire Hotel, Toronto, Ontario [4][32]
World of Commodore 2005 3 December 2005 Alderwood United Church, Toronto, Ontario [45]
World of Commodore 2006 2 December 2006 Alderwood United Church, Toronto, Ontario [33][6]
World of Commodore 2007 1 December 2007 Alderwood United Church, Toronto, Ontario [36]
World of Commodore 2008 6 December 2008 Alderwood United Church, Toronto, Ontario [46]
World of Commodore 2009 5 December 2009 Toronto, Ontario [47]
World of Commodore 2010 4 December 2010 Holiday Inn, Mississauga, Ontario [48]
World of Commodore 2011 3 December 2011 Admiral Inn, Mississauga, Ontario [49][50]
World of Commodore 2012 1 December 2012 Admiral Inn, Mississauga, Ontario [37]
World of Commodore 2013 7 December 2013 Admiral Inn, Mississauga, Ontario [39]
World of Commodore 2014 6 December 2014 Admiral Inn, Mississauga, Ontario [51]
World of Commodore 2015 5 December 2015 Admiral Inn, Mississauga, Ontario [5]
World of Commodore 2016 3-4 December 2016 Admiral Inn, Mississauga, Ontario [52]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The First Annual World of Commodore Show". The Transactor. Transactor Publishing. 4 (6): 14–15. 1984. Retrieved 26 December 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Scuttlebutt". AmigaUser. Ion International (7): 8. March 1989. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d e "World of Commodore/Amiga '92". c't. Heinz Heise: 19. November 1992.
  4. ^ a b c d "The Commodore PET lives on". The Globe and Mail. 23 November 2004. Archived from the original on 6 March 2005. Retrieved 26 December 2014.
  5. ^ a b "World of Commodore 2015". Toronto PET Users Group.
  6. ^ a b c d e Daffern, Ian (2 December 2006). "They adore their 64s". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 28 December 2014.
  7. ^ a b c d Randall, Neil (March 1988). "Report from Toronto: The World of Commodore". COMPUTE!'s Gazette. COMPUTE! Publications. 6 (3): 16–18. Retrieved 26 December 2014.
  8. ^ a b c Commodore Canada (November–December 1983). "World of Commodore". TORPET. Toronto PET Users Group (25): 11.
  9. ^ World of Commodore (PDF). Commodore Canada. 8 December 1983. Retrieved 26 December 2014.
  10. ^ a b c The World of Commodore II (PDF). The Toronto Star. 27 November 1984. Retrieved 26 December 2014.
  11. ^ a b "News BRK". The Transactor. Transactor Publishing. 5 (6): 76–79. 1985. Retrieved 1 March 2015.
  12. ^ a b c World of Commodore III Show (PDF). The Toronto Star. 3 December 1985. Retrieved 26 December 2014.
  13. ^ a b c Grantham, Tim (May 1987). "The First Annual World of Commodore Show" (PDF). The Transactor. Transactor Publishing. 7 (6): 74–75. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  14. ^ a b c d Brown, Mark R. (March–April 1988). "World of Commodore Show". .info. Info Publications (19): 41–42. Retrieved 26 December 2014.
  15. ^ a b c d e f Randall, Neil (March 1988). "Centerstage: AMIGA! The World of Commodore Show". COMPUTE!. COMPUTE! Publications. 10 (3): 44–48. Retrieved 26 December 2014.
  16. ^ a b c d "Commodore Clips: News, Notes, and New Products". COMPUTE!'s Gazette. COMPUTE! Publications. 7 (6): 16–18. June 1989. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  17. ^ "Reportage: World of Commodore Show 1989". Amiga News. July 1989. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  18. ^ a b The Official Show Guide to the World of Commodore Amiga (PDF). COMPUTE! Publications. 1990. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  19. ^ "CDTV (CD1000)". The Commodore CDTV Information Center. Oliver Hannaford-Day. Retrieved 22 January 2015.
  20. ^ a b c Commodore International (June 1991). "World of Commodore/Amiga Australia '91". Amazing Computing. PiM Publications. 6 (6): 97. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  21. ^ a b c d Brisson, Dennis; Wallace, Lou (December 1992). "Overscan: News, New Products and Networks". The Australian Commodore and Amiga Review. IDG Communications. 8 (12): 8–12.
  22. ^ a b "Commodore introduces the Amiga 4000 at World of Commodore show" (Press release). Pasadena, California: Commodore Business Machines. 11 September 1992. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  23. ^ a b c Heinisch, Jürgen (January 1993). "The World of Commodore 1992". GEOS User Post. GEOS User Club (26): 3–4. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  24. ^ a b "Notepad". The Australian Commodore and Amiga Review. Saturday Magazine. 10 (7): 6–12. July 1993.
  25. ^ a b Sue West (10 April 1992). "World of Commodore/Amiga". Newsgroupcomp.sys.amiga.announce. Usenet: 12122@ucdavis.ucdavis.edu. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  26. ^ a b c d "World of Commodore Show Guide". The Australian Commodore and Amiga Review. Saturday Magazine. 10 (7): 16–21. November 1993.
  27. ^ a b "World of Commodore, Pasadena". The Australian Commodore and Amiga Review. Saturday Magazine. 10 (11): 10. July 1993. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  28. ^ a b c Vost, Ben (November 1993). "World of Commodore Cologne". Amazing Computing. PiM Publications. 9 (2): 51–53. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  29. ^ a b "World of Commodore New York Show Report". The Australian Commodore and Amiga Review. Saturday Magazine. 10 (5): 24–25. May 1993. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  30. ^ a b "World of Amiga Toronto 1995" (Press release). Wonder Computers Information Technology Division. 29 November 1995. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  31. ^ "AV & Photogenics". Sound on Sound. February 1995. Retrieved 28 December 2014.
  32. ^ a b "The World of Commodore Expo 2004". Toronto PET Users Group.
  33. ^ a b "TPUG - World of Commodore Expo". Toronto PET Users Group.
  34. ^ Bolton, Syd (17 October 2007). "Jim Butterfield Memorial Tribute". YouTube. Retrieved 28 December 2014.
  35. ^ Henry, Michele (4 December 2006). "Geeks click on a technology icon". The Toronto Star.
  36. ^ a b "TPUG - World of Commodore Expo". Toronto PET Users Group.
  37. ^ a b "World of Commodore 2012". Toronto PET Users Group.
  38. ^ Brudzynski, Matt (presenter) (3 January 2013). World of Commodore 2012 – M.U.L.E. Returns. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Toronto PET Users Group. Retrieved 26 December 2014.
  39. ^ a b c "World of Commodore 2013". Toronto PET Users Group.
  40. ^ "Ahoy! - Issue 37 (1987-01)(Ion International)(US) : Free Download & Streaming". Internet Archive.
  41. ^ a b "Chronology of the Commodore 64 Computer".
  42. ^ Rosinski, Rick. "World of Commodore show report". Archived from the original on 27 December 2014. Retrieved 26 December 2014.
  43. ^ "What's New" (PDF). Amiga Computing. Europress Publications (40): 12. September 1991. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  44. ^ "World of Commodore Toronto Report". The Australian Commodore and Amiga Review. Saturday Magazine. 10 (2). February 1993.
  45. ^ "World of Commodore Expo 2005". TPUG.
  46. ^ "TPUG - World of Commodore Expo".
  47. ^ "World of Commodore 2009 Recap".
  48. ^ "World of Commodore 2010". Facebook.
  49. ^ "World of Commodore (Toronto) December 3, 2011 - Facebook".
  50. ^ "World of Commodore 2011 December 3rd In Toronto". Slashdot.
  51. ^ "World of Commodore 2014". Toronto PET Users Group.
  52. ^ "World of Commodore 2016". Toronto PET Users Group.

External links[edit]