Worm's-eye view

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Worm's-eye view with two vanishing points

A worm's-eye view is a view of an object from below, as though the observer were a worm; the opposite of a bird's-eye view.[1] It can be used to look up to something to make an object look tall, strong, and mighty while the viewer feels child-like or powerless.[2] A worm's eye view commonly uses three-point perspective, with one vanishing point on top, one on the left, and one on the right.[3]

It is a very common technique in paintings. The term a worm's-eye view is a controversial term in real photography or videography circles,[citation needed] as some argue[citation needed] it cannot technically exist because worm's don't have eyes. More often than not, this technique is considered a modification of a low angle shot.[citation needed]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "Point Of View In Photography". Student Resources. 2014-12-09. Retrieved 2017-06-13. 
  2. ^ "Camera Work: What's Your Angle". Videomaker.com. Retrieved 2017-06-13. 
  3. ^ Teacher, The Helpful Art (2011-01-12). "The Helpful Art Teacher: THREE POINT PERSPECTIVE... WORM'S EYE vs. BIRD'S EYE VIEW". The Helpful Art Teacher. Retrieved 2017-06-13.