Wrestle Kingdom V

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Wrestle Kingdom V
Wrestle Kingdom V.jpg
Promotional poster for the event, featuring various NJPW wrestlers
Information
Promotion New Japan Pro-Wrestling
Date January 4, 2011[1]
Attendance 42,000[2] (official)
18,000[3] (claimed)
Venue Tokyo Dome[1]
City Tokyo, Japan[1]
Pay-per-view chronology
Circuit 2010 New Japan Alive Wrestle Kingdom V The New Beginning (2011)
Wrestle Kingdom chronology
Wrestle Kingdom IV Wrestle Kingdom V Wrestle Kingdom VI

Wrestle Kingdom V in Tokyo Dome (レッスルキングダムⅤ in 東京ドーム, Ressuru Kingudamu Ⅴ in Tōkyō Dōmu) was a professional wrestling pay-per-view (PPV) event produced by the New Japan Pro-Wrestling (NJPW) promotion, which took place at the Tokyo Dome in Tokyo, Japan on January 4, 2011.[1][4] It was the 20th January 4 Tokyo Dome Show and the fifth held under the "Wrestle Kingdom" name.[2][3] The event featured thirteen matches (including two dark matches), four of which were contested for championships. Wrestle Kingdom is traditionally NJPW's biggest event of the year and has been described as their equivalent to WWE's WrestleMania.[5]

The show included wrestlers from the American Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA) and Mexican Consejo Mundial de Lucha Libre (CMLL) promotions for the fourth and third year in a row, respectively. During the show, the TNA World Heavyweight Championship was defended for the first time in Japan. The three matches involving TNA wrestlers were aired by the American company as part of Global Impact 3.[6] Wrestlers from DDT Pro-Wrestling, Pro Wrestling Noah and Pro Wrestling Zero1 also took part in the show.

While NJPW announced an attendance number of 42,000, which would have been the largest audience at a January 4 Tokyo Dome Show in six years,[7] Dave Meltzer claimed that the actual attendance number was 18,000, tied with the 2007 Tokyo Dome show for the smallest audience in the event's history.[3]

Production[edit]

Storylines[edit]

Wrestle Kingdom V featured thirteen professional wrestling matches that involved different wrestlers from pre-existing scripted feuds and storylines. Wrestlers portrayed villains, heroes, or less distinguishable characters in the scripted events that built tension and culminated in a wrestling match or series of matches.[8]

Satoshi Kojima, who headed into Wrestle Kingdom V as the defending IWGP Heavyweight Champion

Wrestle Kingdom V was headlined by Satoshi Kojima defending the IWGP Heavyweight Championship against Hiroshi Tanahashi in what was described as a "typical" NJPW storyline, where the company had put their top title on an outsider, leading to their biggest star getting it back at the Tokyo Dome. Kojima had started his career in NJPW, but jumped to All Japan Pro Wrestling (AJPW) in 2002 and was now working as a freelancer.[3]

Event[edit]

In the main event of the show, Hiroshi Tanahashi defeated Satoshi Kojima to win the IWGP Heavyweight Championship, bringing the title back to NJPW.[2] The semi-main event was a grudge match, where Togi Makabe defeated Masato Tanaka.[2]

The event featured several wrestlers from the American Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA) promotion as part of a relationship between NJPW and TNA. In the highest-profile of the matches involving TNA, Jeff Hardy successfully defended the TNA World Heavyweight Championship against NJPW's Tetsuya Naito, who had previously worked for TNA as part of the No Limit tag team.[1] In another interpromotional match, TNA's Rob Van Dam defeated NJPW's Toru Yano in a hardcore match.[1] In the first match involving TNA wrestlers, Beer Money, Inc. (James Storm and Robert Roode) unsuccessfully challenged Bad Intentions (Giant Bernard and Karl Anderson) for the IWGP Tag Team Championship in a three-way match, also involving Muscle Orchestra (Manabu Nakanishi and Strong Man).[1]

In addition, the event included two interpromotional matches between NJPW and Pro Wrestling Noah. In the first, Noah's Takashi Sugiura and Yoshihiro Takayama defeated Hirooki Goto and Kazuchika Okada.[1] This match was a one night NJPW return for Okada, who afterwards returned to TNA to continue his overseas learning excursion.[9] In the second match, NJPW's Shinsuke Nakamura defeated Noah's Go Shiozaki.[2]

The IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship was also defended during the event with Prince Devitt defeating Kota Ibushi for his fourth successful defense.[2]

Results[edit]

No. Results[1][4][10] Stipulations Times[2]
1D Tama Tonga, Tiger Mask, Tomoaki Honma and Wataru Inoue defeated Chaos (Gedo, Jado, Tomohiro Ishii and Yujiro Takahashi) Eight-man tag team match 07:33
2D Koji Kanemoto and Ryusuke Taguchi defeated Kenny Omega and Taichi Tag team match 08:04
3 Bad Intentions (Giant Bernard and Karl Anderson) (c) defeated Beer Money, Inc. (James Storm and Robert Roode) and Muscle Orchestra (Manabu Nakanishi and Strong Man) Three way tag team match for the IWGP Tag Team Championship 08:36
4 Máscara Dorada and La Sombra defeated Héctor Garza and Jushin Thunder Liger Tag team match 07:42
5 Hiroyoshi Tenzan defeated Takashi Iizuka Deep Sleep to Lose match; the match could only be won by choking the opponent unconscious 11:13
6 Rob Van Dam defeated Toru Yano Hardcore match 11:28
7 Yuji Nagata defeated Minoru Suzuki Singles match 16:15
8 Prince Devitt (c) defeated Kota Ibushi Singles match for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship 16:22
9 Takashi Sugiura and Yoshihiro Takayama defeated Hirooki Goto and Kazuchika Okada Tag team match 12:08
10 Jeff Hardy (c) defeated Tetsuya Naito Singles match for the TNA World Heavyweight Championship 11:04
11 Shinsuke Nakamura defeated Go Shiozaki Singles match 14:17
12 Togi Makabe defeated Masato Tanaka Singles match 12:46
13 Hiroshi Tanahashi defeated Satoshi Kojima (c) Singles match for the IWGP Heavyweight Championship 21:57
  • (c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match
  • D – indicates the match was a dark match

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "1/4 NJPW results in Tokyo: Detailed report on TNA at Tokyo Dome Show – Jeff Hardy's performance, reactions to TNA wrestlers, Borash ring intros". Pro Wrestling Torch. January 4, 2011. Retrieved August 25, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g レッスルキングダムⅤ in 東京ドーム. New Japan Pro-Wrestling (in Japanese). Retrieved August 25, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d Meltzer, Dave (January 10, 2011). "Jan 10 Observer Newsletter: Sonnen legal issues, UFC booking, Dynamite!!, Tough Enough, Tokyo Dome". Wrestling Observer Newsletter. Campbell, California: 19–20. ISSN 1083-9593. 
  4. ^ a b Nemer, Paul (January 4, 2011). "1/4 TNA and NJPW Results: Tokyo, Japan". Wrestleview. Retrieved August 25, 2017. 
  5. ^ Martin, Garrett (January 16, 2015). "Japanese Wrestling's Golden Age Comes to America". Paste. Retrieved August 25, 2017. 
  6. ^ Martin, Adam (February 22, 2011). "TNA Global Impact 3 to be on demand this week". Wrestleview. Retrieved August 26, 2017. 
  7. ^ Boutwell, Josh (January 7, 2011). "Viva La Raza! Lucha Weekly". Wrestleview. Archived from the original on May 11, 2012. Retrieved August 25, 2017. 
  8. ^ Grabianowski, Ed. "How Pro Wrestling Works". HowStuffWorks, Inc. Discovery Communications. Archived from the original on November 18, 2013. Retrieved August 25, 2017. 
  9. ^ 「仙台で選手権ができる喜びを感じてる」2・20 棚橋の初防衛戦は真壁vs小島の勝者!!. New Japan Pro-Wrestling (in Japanese). January 5, 2011. Retrieved August 25, 2017. 
  10. ^ Hoops, Brian (January 4, 2017). "Daily Pro Wrestling History (01/04): NJPW Tokyo Dome cards". Wrestling Observer Newsletter. Retrieved August 25, 2017. 

External links[edit]