Wugang dialect

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[references corrupted]

Wugang dialect
Chinese: 武岡話
Native to People's Republic of China
Region Wugang, Hunan province
Ethnicity Hunanese Han chinese from Wugang
Language codes
ISO 639-3
hsn-luo
Glottolog None

Wugang dialect (Wu kang in wade giles) is an Old Xiang Chinese dialect spoken in Wugang, Hunan in China.

Classification[edit]

Wugang is an Old Xiang dialect,[1] related to other Old Xiang dialects like Shaoyang dialect.[2][3]

Geographic distribution[edit]

Wugang dialect is spoken in Wugang, Hunan.

Dialects[edit]

Wenping dialect is a sub-dialect of Wugang dialect.[4]

Features[edit]

Wugang words with the D tone are the only words in which devoicing can occur,[5] with voiced stop and fricative initials.[6][7]

Wugang dialect is one of the dialects which use 佢 or 其 as the pronoun for the third person.[8][9][10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Original from the University of Michigan Digitized May 16, 2008 Margaret Mian Yan (2006). Introduction to Chinese dialectology. Volume 22 of LINCOM studies in Asian linguistics. LINCOM Europa. p. 107. ISBN 3-89586-629-6. Retrieved February 29, 2012. Previously, the subgroupings of the Xiang dialects was based on the evolution of MC initials. Not until 1999, did Norman first use vocalism as a basis for dialect classification, claiming that "New Xiang dialects like Changsha .. and Hengyang .. show the Mandarin pattern. Old Xiang dialects which preserve voiced obstruent initials to some degree are not consistent; some like Shaoyang .. and Wugang .. show the Mandarin pattern while some others like Loudi .. show a Gan-like partem. This suggests that the status of Xiang as a 
  2. ^ Bangxin Ding; Ai-qin Yu; Anne O. Yue-Hashimoto (2005). 紀念李方桂先生百年冥誕論文集 "Yu yan ji yu yan xue" zhuan kan. Zhong yang yan jiu yuan yu yan xue yan jiu suo. Retrieved February 29, 2012. Appendix 1 : The classification and distribution of structural particles in the Hunan dialects 'longshan Sa0^zhi Zhangjiajie Yongshusi ... Wugang Shaoyang 0 Hengyang ^ cha|¡ng o Qiyang Lengshuitan Tongdao о .inning ev Chengb Le(' . 
  3. ^ Original from the University of Virginia Digitized Oct 19, 2007 University of California, Berkeley. Project on Linguistic Analysis (2002). Journal of Chinese linguistics, Volumes 30-31. Project on Linguistic Analysis. p. 334. Retrieved February 29, 2012. Appendix i: Map) The classification and distribution of dialects spoken in Hunan lanyuan Xinshao • Shaodong Hengyang t Qi*>ng o .Wugang Sh«oying Lenphuitan Dongkou 
  4. ^ Yunji Wu (2005). A synchronic and diachronic study of the grammar of the Chinese Xiang dialects. Volume 162 of Trends in linguistics: Studies and monographs Volume 162 of Trends in Linguistics Series. Walter de Gruyter. p. 385. ISBN 3-11-018366-8. Retrieved February 29, 2012. 1998: 168 Shuangfeng + (Hongshan) Wangcheng (Qiaoyi) - Wugang - (Wenping) WX -Guzhang — (Shuangxi) WX-Yuanling Xiangtan + (Yijiahe) Xiangxiang + (Wangchunmen ) Xiangyin ... Data and sources of Chapter 4: Pronouns in the Hunan dialects 
  5. ^ Original from the University of Virginia Digitized Apr 30, 2009Zhong yang yan jiu yuan. Li shi yu yan yan jiu suo (1975). Bulletin of the National Research Institute of History and Philology, Volume 46, Part 4. Gai suo. p. 640. Retrieved February 29, 2012. Among the dialects of Hunan, for example, the devoicing process has operated independently on Ancient voiced stops, affricates, and fricatives in different tonal categories and different dialects. Among the dialects of Wu-kang (AM), Shuang-feng (^^), and Tung-k'ou Huang-ch'iao (ÜR] Pff1Ü)> the devoicing process was accomplished only among words with the D tone. Among the dialects of Ling-ling (ЗД|^), Hsü-p'u (Щ&), Yung-shun ШЩ), Pao-ching ( ftflf), Yiing-sui (*$), Ku- chang (•££), Juan-ling (гШ), Lu-hsi (}Ш), Ch'ien-ch' eng (ЗШ), Ch'en-hsi (SSI). an(i Shao-yang (Sßß&) only words with B, C, 
  6. ^ John McCoy; Timothy Light (1986). John McCoy; Timothy Light, eds. Contributions to Sino-Tibetan studies. Volume 5 of Cornell linguistic contributions. Brill Archive. p. 387. ISBN 90-04-07850-9. Retrieved February 29, 2012. In the second subtype, voiced stop and affricate initials have, with some residue, been devoiced in words which had in the Ch'ieh-yün the D tone. Dialects of this type are (1) Shuang-feng, (2) Wu-kang, and (3) Huang-ch'iao; only for Shuang-feng do we have substantial material on record. In the third subtype, devoicing has extended beyond the initials of the D-tone words (which 
  7. ^ John McCoy; Timothy Light (1986). John McCoy; Timothy Light, eds. Contributions to Sino-Tibetan studies. Volume 5 of Cornell linguistic contributions. Brill Archive. p. 390. ISBN 90-04-07850-9. Retrieved February 29, 2012. 2. 1. Shuang-feng. 2. Wu-kang. 3. Huang-ch'iao 
  8. ^ Graham Thurgood; Randy J. LaPolla (2003). Graham Thurgood, Randy J. LaPolla, ed. The Sino-Tibetan languages. Volume 3 of Routledge language family series (illustrated ed.). Psychology Press. p. 85. ISBN 0-7007-1129-5. Retrieved February 29, 2012. Sanming Sanyuan, Jian'ou, Nanpfng Xiayang, Jianyang, Songxi, Zhenghe, Shunchang Ydngdun, Pucheng, Shunchang, Jiangle, Mfngxi) and a small number of Xiang dialects (Suining, Chengbu, Wugang, Xupu, Xinhua, Qfyang, Mayang); while ffi [i] 
  9. ^ Graham Thurgood; Randy J. LaPolla (2003). Graham Thurgood, Randy J. LaPolla, ed. The Sino-Tibetan languages. Volume 3 of Routledge language family series (illustrated ed.). Psychology Press. p. 85. ISBN 0-7007-1129-5. Retrieved February 29, 2012. 2.2.2 Personal pronouns While the first and the second person pronouns find cognates across the Chinese dialects, the third person pronoun is most diverse, even within major dialect groups, Q [t'a55] and its cognates are widely used only in the Northern, most Xiang, and a small number of Wu (for example, Yi'xing, Liyang, Jinhua, Danyang, Jingjiang, Changzhou, Wiixi) dialects;4 fg [k'-f or S [Id] and its cognates are used in the Yue. the Hakka, most Gan, some Wu - especially southern Wu (Changshii, Huzhou Shuanglin, Zhuji, Yuyao, Ni'ngbo. Huangyan, Wen/hou, Qiizhou, Jinhua, Y6ngkang), the Huizhou (Jixi. Shexian Tiinxi . Xiunfng. Yixian. Qfmen, Wuyuan), some Western Min (YSngan, Shaxian. Sanming Sanyuan, Jian'ou, Nanpfng Xiayang, Jianyang, Songxi, Zhenghe, Shunchang Ydngdun, Pucheng, Shunchang, Jiangle, Mfngxi) and a small number of Xiang dialects (Suining, Chengbu, Wugang, Xupu, Xinhua, Qfyang, Mayang); while ffi [i] and its cognates are used in most Min and Wu dialects. 
  10. ^ Graham Thurgood; Randy J. LaPolla (2003). Graham Thurgood, Randy J. LaPolla, ed. The Sino-Tibetan languages. Volume 3 of Routledge language family series (illustrated ed.). Psychology Press. p. 85. ISBN 0-7007-1129-5. Retrieved February 29, 2012. 2.2.2 Personal pronouns While the first and the second person pronouns find cognates across the Chinese dialects, the third person pronoun is most diverse, even within major dialect groups, 他 [t'a55] and its cognates are widely used only in the Northern, most Xiang, and a small number of Wu (for example, Yi'xing, Liyang, Jinhua, Danyang, Jingjiang, Changzhou, Wiixi) dialects;4 佢 [k'-] or 其 [ki] and its cognates are used in the Yue. the Hakka, most Gan, some Wu - especially southern Wu (Changshii, Huzhou Shuanglin, Zhuji, Yuyao, Ni'ngbo. Huangyan, Wen/hou, Qiizhou, Jinhua, Y6ngkang), the Huizhou (Jixi. Shexian Tiinxi . Xiunfng. Yixian. Qfmen, Wuyuan), some Western Min (YSngan, Shaxian. Sanming Sanyuan, Jian'ou, Nanpfng Xiayang, Jianyang, Songxi, Zhenghe, Shunchang Ydngdun, Pucheng, Shunchang, Jiangle, Mfngxi) and a small number of Xiang dialects (Suining, Chengbu, Wugang, Xupu, Xinhua, Qfyang, Mayang); while 伊 [i] and its cognates are used in most Min and Wu dialects.