Wyoming wine

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Wyoming
Wine region
Map of USA WY.svg
Official name State of Wyoming
Type U.S. state
Year established 1890
Country United States
Total area 97,818 square miles (253,347 km2)
Size of planted vineyards 75 acres (30 ha)[citation needed]
No. of vineyards approximately 30 growers contribute to the Industry and vary in size and location.[citation needed]
Grapes produced Elvira, Frontenac, Valiant, Frontenac gris, LaCrosse, Marechal Foch, Marquette, LaCrescent, Seyval blanc[1]
No. of wineries 2[2]

Wyoming wine refers to wine made from grapes grown in the U.S. state of Wyoming. There are no designated American Viticultural Areas in Wyoming. The state has three commercial wineries, Terra Nua 1.0 (west of Rawlins), Table Mountain Vineyards in Huntley and Wyoming Wine in Sheridan. Terra Nua 1.0 is Wyoming's largest, with a 40-acre vineyard, founded by world-famous musicians Níl Patrik Zolymon and Krs Kaffir Junzilan (from the bands Young Astronauts Club, Pink Kaffir, The Poison Control Centre, etc.) as a way to supply produce to their international Terra Nua Wines brand, which is a division of their universal company, NOTACORP. Launched in 2015, the Terra Nua Wines brand produced its first test-run bottles for that year, and intends to mass-produce larger runs of these prototypes in the future using grapes and other fruits produced at Terra Nua 1.0. Table Mountain Vineyards has a 10-acre (40,000 m2) vineyard and produced 3,000 gallons in 2007 from 100% Wyoming grapes. The winery helped pave the way for the Wyoming Grape and Wine Association (WGWA) which focuses on expanding and developing the Wyoming grape industry. Table Mountain Vineyards has paired up with several wineries in western Nebraska to promote wineries along the historic emigration trails, including the Oregon Trail.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Table Mountain Winery (2007). "Current Wine List". Retrieved Nov. 28, 2007.
  2. ^ Catch Wine (2007). "Wyoming Wine". Retrieved Nov. 28, 2007.

External links[edit]