Xu Huaiwen

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Xu Huaiwen
Personal information
Birth name 徐懷雯
Country  Germany
Born (1975-08-02) August 2, 1975 (age 42)
China Guiyang, Guizhou
Handedness Right
Event Women's singles

Xu Huaiwen (simplified Chinese: 徐怀雯; traditional Chinese: 徐懷雯; pinyin: Xú Huáiwén; born August 2, 1975) is a badminton player from Germany. She was born in Guiyang, Guizhou, People's Republic of China. She decided to play for Germany because the Chinese thought that she was too short to play professional world badminton.[1]

Career[edit]

Xu was among the most successful of a number of Chinese-born female players who emigrated from their badminton-rich homeland, in part, for a better opportunity to play in the world's biggest events. Beginning in 2003 when she won a spate of middle tier open tournaments in Europe, Xu went on to become one of the more consistent performers on the international circuit. She was a women's singles bronze medalist twice at the BWF World Championships (2005 and 2006) and won European Championships in 2006 and 2008 over Mia Audina and Tine Rasmussen respectively in the finals.[2][3] At the 2008 Beijing Olympics Xu was eliminated in a close quarterfinal match by China's Xie Xingfang, the world's number one ranked player.

Among Xu's more than twenty national and international singles titles are the Scottish (2003), Polish (2003), Dutch (2005), and Swiss (2006) Opens, the Copenhagen Masters (2007), and five consecutive (2004–2008) German National Championships. Notably, she earned all of these titles after turning 27, an age at which world level singles players often feel that their best years are behind them.

Xu retired from playing on the international circuit in 2009 and worked as a coach for two years at the Bellevue Badminton Club near Seattle, teaching the Junior National team of young badminton players hoping to succeed in professional badminton. In 2010, she was appointed as an International Olympic Committee athlete role model for the 2010 Summer Youth Olympics. From 2011 to 2012, she served the Dutch Badminton Association as their National Coach.

Personal life[edit]

XU speaks fluent Chinese, German and English.[1] She is married to Matthew Curtain, the Director of Sport of the Commonwealth Games Federation. The couple has a daughter.

Achievements[edit]

World Grand Prix[edit]

Women's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result
2006 Bitburger Open Indonesia Maria Kristin Yulianti 21–17, 21–17 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2006 Swiss Open China Zhu Lin 11–9, 11–4 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2005 Dutch Open Netherlands Yao Jie 11–7, 11–2 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2005 Bitburger Open Singapore Xing Aiying 11–3, 11–2 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2005 Thessaloniki World Grand Prix Germany Juliane Schenk 11–2, 11–5 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2005 Swiss Open France Pi Hongyan 12–13, 6–11 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2004 German Open China Xie Xingfang 11–9, 6–11, 7–11 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
1997 Vietnam Open Indonesia Susi Susanti 4–11, 1–11 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
1994 US Open China Liu Guimei 11–8, 5–11, 6–11 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
     BWF Grand Prix tournament

International Challenge/Series[edit]

Women's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result
2008 White Nights Germany Juliane Schenk 21–15, 15–21, 21–19 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2005 Belgian International Germany Juliane Schenk 11–4, 11–1 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2004 Bitburger Open Germany Petra Overzier 11–4, 11–2 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 Bitburger Open France Pi Hongyan 11–3, 11–2 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 Scottish International Japan Chie Umezu 11–4, 11–5 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 Spanish International Germany Petra Overzier 11–4, 11–5 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 Giraldilla International Japan Yuki Shimada 11–4, 11–7 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 Austrian Open Bulgaria Petya Nedelcheva 11–7, 11–1 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 Finnish Open Bulgaria Petya Nedelcheva 11–6, 8–11, 11–5 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2003 Polish Open Wales Kelly Morgan 11–5, 9–11, 11–3 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2002 BMW Open International France Pi Hongyan 9–11, 1–11 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2001 BMW Open International France Pi Hongyan 5–7, 7–3, 2–7 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2000 BMW Open International Netherlands Judith Meulendijks 11–4, 11–5 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2000 Le Volant d'Or de Toulouse Ukraine Elena Nozdran 11–4, 8–11, 11–4 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
     BWF International Series tournament

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Said by David Mercer/Gillian Clark on August 13, 2008 in match against Xie Xingfang in the quarterfinals of the women's singles shown on the BBC.
  2. ^ "2006 European Championships winners". tournamentsoftware.com. 
  3. ^ "2008 European Championships winners". tournamentsoftware.com. Retrieved 2008-04-21. 

External links[edit]