Yūgumo-class destroyer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Naganami.jpg
Naganami in June 1942
Class overview
Name: Yūgumo-class destroyer
Builders:
Operators:  Imperial Japanese Navy
Preceded by: Kagerō class
Succeeded by: Matsu class
Built: 1940–1944
In commission: 1941–1945
Planned: 14 (1939) + 16 (1941) + 8 (1942)
Completed: 19
Cancelled: 19
Lost: 19
General characteristics
Displacement:
  • 2,077 tons standard,
  • 2,520 tons battle condition
Length:
  • 119.03 m (390 ft 6 in) overall,
  • 117.00 m (383 ft 10 in) waterline
Beam: 10.80 m (35 ft 5 in)
Draft: 3.76 m (12 ft 4 in)
Propulsion:
  • 3 × Kampon water tube boilers,
  • 2 × Kanpon impulse geared turbines,
  • 52,000 shp (39 MW), 2 shafts
Speed: 35.5 knots (40.9 mph; 65.7 km/h)
Range: 5,000 nmi (9,300 km) at 18 kn (21 mph; 33 km/h)
Complement: 225 (Yūgumo, 1941)
Armament:

The Yūgumo-class destroyers (夕雲型駆逐艦, Yūgumo-gata kuchikukan) were a group of 19 destroyers built for the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II. The IJN called them Destroyer Type-A (甲型駆逐艦,, Kō-gata Kuchikukan) from their plan name. No ships of the class survived the war.

Background[edit]

The Yūgumo class was a repeat of the preceding Kagerō class with minor improvements that increased their anti-aircraft capabilities. The first 11 ships of the class were ordered as part of the 1939 4th Naval Armaments Supplement Programme. Another 16 ships (the Hamanami sub-class) were ordered as part of the 1941 Rapid Naval Armaments Supplement Programme, but of these eight were canceled before being laid down. Another eight ships were planned under the 1942 Modified 5th Naval Armaments Supplement Programme, but these were also canceled.[1]

Design and description[edit]

The Yūgumo class was 45 tons heavier and a few feet longer than the Kagerō class, distinguishable in silhouette primarily by the shape of the bridge. The Yūgumo class had a forward slope on the bridge, which was intended to reduce wind resistance and improve stability. Another difference was that the Yūgumo-class vessels were built by three different shipyards, and there were minor differences between individual ships, depending on the builder and when the ship was built.[1]

The general specifications for the Yūgumo class was a 119.17-meter (391 ft 0 in) overall length, with a beam of 10.8 meters (35 ft 5 in) and a draft of 3.76 meters (12 ft 4 in).[2] They displaced 2,110 metric tons (2,080 long tons) at standard load and 2,560 metric tons (2,520 long tons) at deep load.[3] Their crew numbered 228 officers and enlisted men.

The ships had two Kampon geared steam turbines, each driving one propeller shaft, using steam provided by three Kampon water-tube boilers. The turbines were rated at a total of 52,000 shaft horsepower (39,000 kW) for a designed speed of 35 knots (65 km/h; 40 mph).[4]

The main battery of the Yūgumo class consisted of six Type 3 127-millimeter (5.0 in) guns in three twin-gun turrets, one superfiring pair aft and one turret forward of the superstructure.[3] The guns were in a new type of mount (known as the "D" mount) which was able to elevate up to 75° to increase their performance against aircraft; however, their slow rate of fire, slow traversing speed, and the lack of any sort of high-angle fire-control system meant that they were virtually useless as anti-aircraft guns.[5] The ships were also armed with eight 610-millimeter (24.0 in) torpedo tubes in a two quadruple traversing mounts; one reload was carried for each tube. Their anti-submarine weapons comprised two depth charge throwers for which 36 depth charges were carried.[3]

As built, the Yūgumo class had four Type 96 25-millimeter (1.0 in) anti-aircraft guns in two twin-mounts forward of the aft smokestack. as with other destroyer classes, as the Pacific War progressed, anti-aircraft armaments were increased. Later, two triple-mount and one twin-mount Type 96 were added forward of the bridge and a Type 22 radar. Units surviving into 1944 had a second triple-mount added on a platform behind the forward smokestack. The six units surviving into 1944 received up to twelve additional single-mount Type 96s and a Type 13 radar. Kiyoshimo also received a number of Type 93 13mm machine guns.[1]

Operational history[edit]

The Yūgumo class were considered elite units and always assigned to escort primary fleet units. They were all lost during the Pacific War.

Ships in class[edit]

Ship # Ship Shipyard Laid down Launched Completed Fate
115 Akigumo (秋雲) Built as part of the Kagerō class
116 Yūgumo (夕雲) Maizuru Naval Arsenal 12 June 1940 16 March 1941 5 December 1941 Sunk, Battle of Vella Lavella, 6 October 1943
117 Makigumo (巻雲) Fujinagata Shipyards 13 December 1940 5 November 1941 14 March 1942 Sunk after surface action, 1 February 1943
118 Kazagumo (風雲) Uraga Dock Company 23 December 1940 26 September 1941 28 March 1942 Torpedoed at Davao Gulf, 8 June 1944
119 Naganami (長波) Fujinagata Shipyards 5 April 1941 5 March 1941 30 June 1942 Air attack, Ormoc Bay, 11 November 1944
120 Makinami (巻波) Maizuru Naval Arsenal 11 April 1941 27 December 1941 8 August 1942 Sunk, Battle of Cape St. George, 25 November 1943
121 Takanami (高波) Uraga Dock Company 29 May 1941 16 March 1942 31 August 1942 Sunk, Battle of Tassafaronga, 30 November 1942
122 Ōnami (大波) Fujinagata Shipyards 15 November 1941 13 August 1942 29 December 1942 Sunk, Battle of Cape St. George, 25 November 1943
123 Kiyonami (清波) Uraga Dock Company 15 October 1941 17 August 1942 25 January 1943 Air attack, NNW of Kolombangara 20 July 1943
124 Tamanami (玉波) Fujinagata Shipyards 16 March 1942 26 December 1942 30 April 1943 Torpedoed, WSW of Manila, 7 July 1944
126 Suzunami (涼波) Uraga Dock Company 27 March 1942 26 December 1942 27 July 1943 Air attack, Rabaul, 11 November 1943
127 Fujinami (藤波) Fujinagata Shipyards 25 August 1942 20 April 1943 31 July 1943 Air attack N of Iloilo, 27 October 1944
128
129
Dummy budget covering Yamato-class battleships
340 Hayanami (早波) Maizuru Naval Arsenal 15 January 1942 19 December 1942 31 July 1943 Torpedoed near Tawi-Tawi, Philippines, 7 June 1944
341 Hamanami (濱波) Maizuru Naval Arsenal 28 April 1942 18 April 1943 15 October 1943 Air attack, Ormoc Bay, 11 November 1944
342 Okinami (沖波) Maizuru Naval Arsenal 5 August 1942 18 July 1943 10 December 1943 Air attack W of Manila, 13 November 1944
343 Kishinami (岸波) Uraga Dock Company 29 August 1942 19 August 1943 3 December 1943 Torpedoed W of Palawan Island, 4 December 1944
344 Asashimo (朝霜) Fujinagata Shipyards 21 January 1943 18 July 1943 27 November 1943 Air attack SW of Nagasaki, 7 April 1945
345 Hayashimo (早霜) Maizuru Naval Arsenal 20 January 1943 20 October 1943 20 February 1944 Air attack off Semirara Island, 26 October 1944
346 Akishimo (秋霜) Fujinagata Shipyards 3 May 1943 5 December 1943 11 March 1944 Air attack, Manila, 13 November 1944
347 Kiyoshimo (清霜) Uraga Dock Company 16 March 1943 29 February 1944 15 May 1944 Torpedoed after air attack, 26 December 1944
348
349
350
351
352
353
354
355
Umigiri (海霧)
Yamagiri (山霧)
Tanigiri (谷霧)
Kawagiri (川霧)
Taekaze (妙風)
Kiyokaze (清風)
Satokaze (里風)
Murakaze (村風)
Cancelled on 11 August 1943
5041
5042
5043
5044
5045
5046
5047
5048
Yamasame (山雨)
Akisame (秋雨)
Natsusame (夏雨)
Hayasame (早雨)
Takashio (高潮)
Akishio (秋潮)
Harushio (春潮)
Wakashio (若潮)
Kai-Yūgumo class
Cancelled on 11 August 1943

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Stille, Mark (2013). Imperial Japanese Navy Destroyers 1919–45 (2). Oxford, UK: Osprey Publishing. p. 20–28. ISBN 978 1 84908 987 6.
  2. ^ Chesneau, p. 195
  3. ^ a b c Whitley, p. 203
  4. ^ Jentschura, Jung & Mickel, p. 150
  5. ^ Campbell, p. 192

References[edit]

  • Campbell, John (1985). Naval Weapons of World War II. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-459-4.Campbell, John (1985). Naval Weapons of World War II. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-459-4.
  • Chesneau, Roger, ed. (1980). Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1922–1946. Greenwich, UK: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-146-7.
  • Jentschura, Hansgeorg; Jung, Dieter & Mickel, Peter (1977). Warships of the Imperial Japanese Navy, 1869–1945. Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute. ISBN 0-87021-893-X.
  • Whitley, M. J. (1988). Destroyers of World War 2. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-326-1.
  • "Rekishi Gunzō"., History of Pacific War Vol.51 The truth of Imperial Japanese Vessels Histories 2, Gakken (Japan), August 2005, ISBN 4-05-604083-4
  • Collection of writings by Sizuo Fukui Vol.5, Stories of Japanese Destroyers, Kōjinsha (Japan) 1993, ISBN 4-7698-0611-6
  • Model Art Extra No.340, Drawings of Imperial Japanese Naval Vessels Part-1, Model Art Co. Ltd. (Japan), October 1989, Book code 08734-10
  • The Maru Special, Japanese Naval Vessels No.41 Japanese Destroyers I, Ushio Shobō (Japan), July 1980, Book code 68343-42

External links[edit]