Y-DNA haplogroups in Central and North Asian populations

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Research into the predominant human Y-DNA haplogroups of Central Asia and Siberia, broken down according to both individual publications and ethnolinguistic groups, are summarized in the table below.

The first two columns of the table list ethnicity and linguistic affiliations, the third column cites the total sample size in each study, and the adjoining columns give the percentage of each haplogrou or subclade found sample in a particular sample.

Population Language n C  I J K* N O3 P* Q R1a R1b/R1* R2 Others Reference
Altaians Turkic 98 22.4 0 3.0 17.3 46.9 0 Tambets 2004[1]
Altaians Turkic 92 13.0 2.2 2.2 0 7.6 28.3 41.3 1.1 D = 3 Derenko 2005[2]
Altaians (northern) Turkic 50 0 2 10 38 6 Kharkov 07[3]
Altaians (southern) Turkic 96 2.1 4.2 11.5 53.1 1 E = 1 Kharkov 2007[3]
Buryats Mongolic 238 63.9 0.4 0 8.8 20.2 1.7 1.7 2.1 0.8 G = 0.4 Derenko 2005[2]
Chukchis Chukotkan 24 4.2 0 0 0 58.3 0 20.8 15.5 4.2 0 0 0 Lell 2001[4]
Dolgans Turkic 67 37.3 1.5 34.1 16.4 1.5 Tambets 2004[1]
Dungans Sino-Tibetan 40 2.5 12.5 2.5 2.5 40 0 7.5 10 5 5 O1 = 5; F(xIJ) = 5 (possibly F(xGHIJK), G, H, or LT) Wells 2001[5]
Evens Tungusic 31 74.2 3.2 12.9 0 6.5 0 Tambets 2004[1]
Evenks Tungusic 96 67.7 5.2 19.8 4.2 1 0 Tambets 2004[1]
Itelmens Kamchatkan 18 67 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 22 0 0 0 Lell 2001[4]
Kalmyks Mongolic 68 70.6 0 0 4.4 2.9 11.8 5.9 2.9 L = 1.5 Derenko 2005[2]
Karakalpaks Turkic 44 22.7 0 9.1 6.8 2.3 11.4 0 0 18.2 9.1 6.8 F(xIJ) = 9 (possibly F(xGHIJK), G, or H);
L = 5
Wells 2001[5]
Kazakhs Turkic 54 66.7 0 0 0 1.9 9.3 5.6 0 3.7 5.6 1.9 D = 2, F(xIJ) = 2 (possibly F(xGHIJK), G, or H) Wells 2001[5]
Kazakhs Turkic 30 40 13.3 10 10 3.3 6.7 F(xIJ) = 17 (possibly F(xGHIJK), G, H, or LT) Karafet 2001[6]
Kazakhs
(Altai Republic)
Turkic 119 59.7
(C3)
0 4.2 0 0 26.1 0 0.8 0.8 2.5 0 G = 5, T = 0.8 Dulik 2011[7]
Kets Dené–Yeniseian 48 6.2 0 0 0 0 0 93.7 0 0 0 0 Tambets 2004[1]
Khakas Turkic 53 5.7 3.8 0 5.7 41.5 7.6 28.3 7.6 Derenko 2005[2]
Khants Uralic 47 0 0 0 0 76.6 0 0 0 4.3 19.1 0 0 Tambets 2004[1]
Koryaks Chukotkan 27 59.2 0 0 0 22.2 0 18.5 0 0 0 0 0 Lell 2001[4]
Kyrgyz Turkic 52 13.5 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 0 63.5 1.9 0 O1 = 5.8 Wells 2001[5]
Mongolians Mongolic 65 53.8 3.1 1.5 10.8 10.8 4.6 9.2 D = 1.5, O2 = 1.5 Xue 2006[8]
Nenets Uralic 148 0 0 97.3 1.4 0 0 Tambets 2004[1]
Nganasans Uralic 38 5.3 0 92.1 0 0 Tambets 2004[1]
Nivkhs Nivkh (isolate) 17 47 35 Lell 2001[4]
Romanis (Uzbekistan) Indo-European 15 0 0 20 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 53 H = 13 Wells 2001[5]
Selkups Uralic 131 1.5 0 6.9 66.4 19.1 6.1 Tambets 2004[1]
Shors Turkic 51 2 0 0 0 15.7 0 2 0 58.8 19.6 0 F(xIJ) = 2 (however, this study did not test – in accordance with later definitions – for subclades of F, such as H2, K2*, NO(xN1c1), Q(xQ-M3), P*, P1, R(xR1), or T).[2] Derenko 2005[2]
Tajiks Indo-European 38 2.6 0 18.4 0 0 0 0 0 44.7 0 7.9 L = 8, H = 5,
E = 3
Wells 2001[5]
Teleuts Turkic 47 8.5 4.3 2.1 0 10.6 0 55.3 12.8 F(xIJ) = 6.4% (however, this study did not test – in accordance
with later definitions – for subclades of F, such as H2, K2*, NO(xN1c1), Q(xQ-M3), P*, P1, R(xR1), or T)
.[2]
Derenko 2005[2]
Tofalars Turkic 32 6.3 3.1 0 3.1 59.4 0 3.1 0 12.5 12.5 0 0 Derenko 2005[2]
Turkmens Turkic 30 0 0 17 13 0 0 10 0 7 37 3 F(xIJ) = 13 (most likely G or H) Wells 2001[5]
Tuvans Turkic 113 7.1 0.9 0 8.9 23.9 35.4 17.7 G = 0.9; F(xIJ) = 3.5 (however, this study did not test – in accordance with later definitions – for subclades of F, such as H2, K2*, NO(xN1c1), Q(xQ-M3), P*, P1, R(xR1), or T).[2] Derenko 2005[2]
Tuvans Turkic 108 38.0 1.9
(R-M73)
0 Malyarchuk 2011[9]
Uyghurs Turkic 70 4.3 11.4 7.1 8.6 11.4 (see "Others") (see "Others") 18.6 (see "Others") (see "Others") P(xR1a) = 17.1 (probably P1, Q, R1b or R2) Xue 2006[8]
Uyghurs Turkic 67 7.5 10.4 6.0 10.5 3.0 (see "Others") (see "Others") (see "Others") D3 = 4.5, G = 4.5, L = 4.5,
R = 46.3 (probably R1a, R1b or R2)
Hammer 2005 [10]
Uyghurs Turkic 187 (four samples) 5.3 0.35 15.7 5.0 (see "Others") 6.78 21.6 6.7 2.6 D = 3.75, E= 2.1, G = 1.5, H = 3.15, L = 3.8,
O(xO3) = 16.2, T = 0.5
Zhong 2010 [11]
Uzbeks Turkic 366 11.5 2.2 13.4 6.8 1.4 4.1 5.5 0 25.1 9.8 2.2 F(xIJK) = 7.9 (most likely G or H), L = 3,
E = 2, D = 2
Wells 2001[5]
Yaghnobis Indo-European 31 3 0 32 3 0 0 3 0 16 32 0 L = 10 Wells 2001[5]
Yakuts Turkic 155 3.2 1.3 88.4 0 1.9 1.9 Tambets 2004[1]
Yukaghir Yukaghir 13 31
(C3)
0 0 0 31 0 0 31 0 0 0 F(xIJ) = 8 (possibly F(xGHIJK), G or H) Duggan 2013[12]
Yupik Eskimo–Aleut 33 0 50.6 0 18.2 21.2 0 Lell 2001[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Tambets, Kristiina et al. 2004, The Western and Eastern Roots of the Saami—the Story of Genetic “Outliers” Told by Mitochondrial DNA and Y Chromosomes
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Miroslava Derenko et al. 2005, Contrasting patterns of Y-chromosome variation in South Siberian populations from Baikal and Altai-Sayan regions
  3. ^ a b Khar'kov, VN; Stepanov, VA; Medvedeva, OF; Spiridonova, MG; Voevoda, MI; Tadinova, VN; Puzyrev, VP (2007). "Gene pool differences between Northern and Southern Altaians inferred from the data on Y-chromosomal haplogroups". Genetika. 43 (5): 675–87. PMID 17633562. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Lell, Jeffrey T. et al. 2001-2002, The Dual Origin and Siberian Affinities of Native American Y Chromosomes
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Wells, Spencer et al. 2001, The Eurasian Heartland: A continental perspective on Y-chromosome diversity
  6. ^ Karafet Tatiana et al. 2001, Paternal Population History of East Asia: Sources, Patterns, and Microevolutionary Processes
  7. ^ Dulik, Matthew C. et al. 2011, Y-Chromosome Variation in Altaian Kazakhs Reveals a Common Paternal Gene Pool for Kazakhs and the Influence of Mongolian Expansions
  8. ^ a b Xue, Yali et al. 2006 Male demography in East Asia: a north-south contrast in human population expansion times Archived September 6, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.
  9. ^ Malyarchuk, Boris et al. 2011, Ancient links between Siberians and Native Americans revealed by subtyping the Y chromosome haplogroup Q1a Archived November 3, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. Journal of Human Genetics (2011) 56, 583–588
  10. ^ Michael F Hammer et al. 2005, Dual origins of the Japanese: common ground for hunter-gatherer and farmer Y chromosomes Journal of Human Genetics (2006) 51, 47–58; doi:10.1007/s10038-005-0322-0
  11. ^ Hua Zhong et al., 2010, "Extended Y-chromosome investigation suggests post-Glacial migrations of modern humans into East Asia via the northern route", Mol Biol Evol, doi: 10.1093/molbev/msq247.
  12. ^ Duggan AT, Whitten M, Wiebe V, Crawford M, Butthof A, et al. (2013) Investigating the Prehistory of Tungusic Peoples of Siberia and the Amur-Ussuri Region with Complete mtDNA Genome Sequences and Y-chromosomal Markers PLoS ONE 8(12): e83570. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0083570

External links[edit]