Y-DNA haplogroups in populations of the Near East

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Listed here are notable ethnic groups and populations from Western Asia, Egypt and South Caucasus by human Y-chromosome DNA haplogroups based on relevant studies. The samples are taken from individuals identified with the ethnic and linguistic designations in the first two columns, the third column gives the sample size studied, and the other columns give the percentage of the particular haplogroup. (IE = Indo-European, AA = Afro-Asiatic) Some old studies conducted in the early 2000s regarded several haplogroups as one haplogroup, e.g. I, G and sometimes J were haplogroup 2, so conversion sometimes may lead to unsubstantial frequencies below.

Table[edit]

Population Language (if specified) n E (xE1b1b) E1b1b G I  J L N R1a R1b T Reference
Arabs (Bedouin) AA (Semitic) 32 0 18.7 0 6.3 65.6 0 0 9.4 0 0 Nebel2001[1]
Arabs (Egypt) AA (Semitic) 147 2.8 36.7 8.8 0.7 32 0 0 2.7 4.1 8.2 Luis2004[2]
Arabs (Egypt) AA (Semitic) 370 2.9 43.7 5.6 0.5 25.4 0.8 0 2.1 5.9 6.2 Bekada2013[3]
Arabs (Egypt) AA (Semitic) 92 3.3 43.5 2.2 1.1 22.8 0 0 0 5.4 7.6 Wood2005[4]
Arabs (Egypt) AA (Semitic) 147 2 36 9 1 31 0 0 3 2 8 AbuAmero2009[5]
Arabs (Egypt) AA (Semitic) 35 5.7 62.9 0 0 31.4 0 0 0 0 0 Kujanová2009[6]
Arabs (Iraq) AA (Semitic) 0.9 8.3 0 0 50.6 0 0 0 0 0 Semino2004[7]
Arabs (Iraq) AA (Semitic) 254 1.2 13.7 2.7 1.6 57.4 2.4 0.4 6.3 5.9 2 Lazim2020[8]
Arabs (Jordan) AA (Semitic) 146 0 26 4.1 3.4 43.8 0 0 1.4 17.8 0 AbuAmero2009[9]
Arabs (Jordan- Dead Sea) AA (Semitic) 0 31 0 0 9 0 0 0 40 0 Flores2005[10]
Arabs (Kuwait - Bedouin) AA (Semitic) 148 0.6 6 3.4 0 84 0 0 6.7 1.3 0 Mohammad2010[11]
Arabs (Oman) AA (Semitic) 121 7.4 15.7 1.7 0 47.9 0.8 0 9.1 1.7 8.3 Luis2004[2]
Arabs (Palestine - Muslim) AA (Semitic) 143 0 20.3 7 6.3 55.2 0 0 1.4 8.4 1.4 Nebel2001[1]
Arabs (Palestine - Christian) AA (Semitic) 44 0 31.8 11.3 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 Fernandes2011[12]
Arabs (Qatar) AA (Semitic) 72 2.8 5.6 2.8 0 66.7 2.8 0 6.9 1.4 0 Cadenas2008[13]
Arabs (Saudi Arabia) AA (Semitic) 157 7.6 7.6 3.2 0 58 1.9 0 5.1 1.9 5.1 AbuAmero2009[9]
Arabs (Syria) AA (Semitic) 20 0 10 0 5 30 0 0 10 15 0 Semino2000[14]
Arabs (Syria) AA (Semitic) 520 1.5 12 5.5 2 55.7 0 0 5.2 4.5 0 Zalloua2008[15] & El-Sibai2009[16]
Yemeni (Soqotra) AA (Semitic) 63 0 9[17] 0 0 85.7 0 0 1.6 0 0 Cerny2009[18]
Arabs (UAE) AA (Semitic) 164 5.5 11.6 4.3 0 45.1 3 0 7.3 4.3 4.9 Cadenas2008[13]
Arabs (Yemen) AA (Semitic) 62 3.2 12.9 1.6 0 82.3 0 0 0 0 0 Cadenas2008[13]
Arabs (Yemen) AA (Semitic) 46 0 17.3 2.1 0 73.9 0 0 4.3 0 0 Haber2019[19]
Armenians IE (Armenian) 89 0 3.4 0 0 29.2 0 3.4 5.6 24.7 0 Rosser2000[20]
Armenians IE (Armenian) 100 0 6 11 5 24 0 0 6 19 0 Nasidze2004[21]
Armenians IE (Armenian) 734 0 5.4 0 0 0 1.6 0 5.3 32.4 0 Weale2001[22]
Assyrians (Iran) AA (Semitic) 48 0 4.2 8.3 0 29.2 0 0 8.3 29.2 8.3 Grugni 2012[23]
Azerbaijanis Turkic 72 0 6 18 3 31 0 0 7 11 0 Nasidze2004[21]
Azerbaijanis Turkic 97 0 4.1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Cruciani2004[24]
Baloch IE (Iranian, NW) 25 0 8 0 0 16 24 0 28 8 0 Sengupta2006[25]
Berbers (Egypt) AA (Berber) 93 6.5 12 3.2 0 14 0 0 0 28 0 Dugoujon2009[26]
Chechens Caucasian (North East) 330 0 0 5.4 0.3 77.6 7 0 3.9 1.8 0 Balanovsky 2011[27]
Cypriots IE (Greek) 45 0 27 0 0 0 0 0 2 9 0 Rosser2000[20]
Dargins Caucasian (North East) 68 0 0 2.9 0 94.1 0 0 0 2.9 0 Yunusbayev2012[28]
Dargins (Kaitaks) Caucasian (North East) 33 0 0 0 0 88.1 0 0 3.3 6.7 0 Balanovsky 2011[27]
Dargins (Kubachis) Caucasian (North East) 65 0 0 0 1.5 98.5 0 0 0 0 0 Balanovsky 2011[27]
Druze AA (Semitic) 28 0 14.3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Cruciani2004[24]
Druze AA (Semitic) 329 0.3 18.5 12.4 0.6 33.4 6.3 0 1.5 14.5 0 Marshall2016[29] & Behar2010
Georgians Caucasian (South) 63 0 0 30.1 0 36.5 1.6 0 7.9 14.3 1.6 Semino2000[14]
Georgians Caucasian (South) 66 0 3 31.8 1.5 36.4 1.5 0 10.6 9.1 1.5 Battaglia2008[30]
Ingush Caucasian (North East) 143 0 0 1.5 0.7 91.6 2.8 0 3.5 0 0 Balanovsky 2011[27]
Iranians (North Iran) IE (Iranian, West) 33 0 0 15.2 0 33.3 3 6.1 6.1 15.2 0 Regueiro2006[31]
Iranians (South Iran) IE (Iranian, West) 117 1.7 5.1 12.8 0 35 6 0.9 16.2 6 3.4 Regueiro2006[31]
Iranians IE (Iranian, West) 130 0 4.6 5.4 24.6 13.8 0 0 19.2 4.6 0 Nasidze2004[21]
Iranians 938 1.8 7 11.7 0.5 31.4 5 0.1 14.3 10.1 3.4 Grugni 2012[23]
Iraqis 203 1 10.8 2.5 0.5 57.6 1 1 6.9 10.8 5.9 Abu A. 2009[9]
Jews (Ashkenazi) AA (Semitic) 79 0 22.8 3.8 6.3 43 0 0 12.7 11.4 0 Nebel2001[1]
Jews (Ashkenazi) AA (Semitic) 442 0.2 19.7 9.7 4.1 38 0.2 0.2 0 0 0 Behar2004.[32]
Jews (Ashkenazi) AA (Semitic) 737 0.3 15.8 9.8 3.0 35.9
J1: 15%
J2: 21%
1.2 0.2 4.2 11.5
M267:8%
2.7 Hammer et al 2009[33][34] Non-Levites or Cohanim.
Jews (Kurdish) AA (Semitic) 95 0 12.1 19.2 6.1 37.4 1 0 4 20.2 0 Nebel2001[1]
Jews (Sephardic) AA (Semitic) 78 0 19.2 7.7 11.5 28.2 0 0 3.9 29.5 0 Nebel2001[1]
Jews (Tunisian) AA (Semitic) 34 0 0 0 0 100 0 0 0 0 0 Manni et al. (2005)[35]
Kurds (Northern Iraq) IE (Iranian, NW) 95 0 7.4 4.2 16.8 40 3.2 0 11.6 16.8 0 Nebel2001[1]
Lebanese AA (Semitic) 916 1.4 17.6 6.6 4.8 44.1 5.2 0.1 2.5 8.3 4.7 AbuAmero2009[9]
Lebanese AA (Semitic) 31 0 18.8 3.2 3.2 52.2 3.2 0 9.7 6.4 0 Semino2000[14]
Lebanese AA (Semitic) 1,116 1 16.75 6.9 3.5 50 5.2 0.1 2.1 7.6 4.7 Zalloua2008[15] & Haber2011[36]
Samaritans (Levites) AA (Semitic) 2 0 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Oefner2013[37]
Samaritans AA (Semitic) 10 0 0 0 0 100 0 0 0 0 0 Oefner2013[37]
Turks Turkic 523 0.2 11.3 10.9 5.4 33.3[38] 4.2 3.8 6.9 16.1 2.5 Cinnioglu2004[39]
Turks Turkic 741 5.1 0[38] Rootsi2004[40]
Turks Turkic 167 0 10.2 0 0 32.9 0 2.4 4.8 20.4 0 Rosser2000[20]
Turks Turkic 59 0 13.6 8.5 6.8 30.5 0 0 11.9 20.3 1.7 Sanchez2005[41]
Turks (Central Anatolia) Turkic 61 6.6 Pericic2005[42]
Turks (Istanbul) Turkic 13 24.7 Semino2004[7]
Turks (Konya) Turkic 14.5 31.8 Semino2004[7]
Turks (Cypriot) Turkic 46 13 Cruciani2004[24]
Turks (Southeastern) Turkic 24 4.2 Cruciani2004[24]
Turks (Erzurum) Turkic 25 4 Cruciani2004[24]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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