YF-23 (rocket engine)

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YF-23E
Country of originChina
First flight1974-11-05
DesignerAcademy of Aerospace Liquid Propulsion Technology
ApplicationVernier engine
Associated L/VFeng Bao 1, Long March 2, Long March 3 and Long March 4
StatusIn Production
Liquid-fuel engine
PropellantN2O4 / UDMH
Mixture ratio1.57
Configuration
Chamber4
Performance
Thrust (vac.)47.1 kN (10,600 lbf)
Isp (vac.)297 seconds (2.91 km/s)
Burn time300s
Used in
Long March 2F, Long March 3A, Long March 3B, Long March 3C, Long March 4B and Long March 4C second stage.
References
References[1][2][3][4]

The YF-23 is a liquid rocket vernier engine, burning N2O4 and UDMH.[5] It is used in along the YF-22 to form the YF-24 and YF-25 propulsion modules.[3][6][7][8]

Versions[edit]

The basic engine has been used since the Feng Bao 1 rocket and has been the vernier propulsion of the Long March 2, Long March 3 and Long March 4 families second stage.[1][9][10]

  • YF-23: Original version.
  • YF-23B (AKA DaFY21-1): Improved version.[9][11][12]
  • YF-23F: Improved version.[9]

Modules[edit]

This engine is bundled into modules along the YF-22 upper stage engine.[13][14][15][16]

The relevant modules for second stage application are:

  • YF-24: A module comprising an YF-22 and a single YF-23 verniers.
  • YF-24B: A module comprising an YF-22B and a single YF-23B verniers.
  • YF-24E: A module comprising an YF-22E and a single YF-23F verniers.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Norbert Bgügge. "Asian space-rocket liquid-propellant engines". B14643.DE. Archived from the original on 2015-07-17. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  2. ^ "Long March". Rocket and Space Technology. Retrieved 2015-07-08.
  3. ^ a b "YF-23". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  4. ^ Sutton, George Paul (November 2005). "Liquid Rocket Propellant Engines in the People's Republic of China". History of Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines. AIAA. p. 873. ISBN 978-1563476495. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  5. ^ Harvey, Brian (2004). "Launch Centers Rockets and Engines". China's Space Program — From Conception to Manned Spaceflight. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 232. ISBN 978-1852335663. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  6. ^ "YF-22/23". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  7. ^ "YF-22A/23A". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  8. ^ "YF-25". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  9. ^ a b c Norbert Bgügge. "YF rocket engine history". B14643.DE. Archived from the original on 2015-07-17. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  10. ^ Norbert Bgügge. "Propulsion FB-1". B14643.DE. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  11. ^ "Chapter 2 — General Description to LM-2E". LM-2E User's Manual. Issue 1999 (pdf). CASC. 1999. pp. 2–2. Retrieved 2015-07-08.
  12. ^ "Chapter 2 — General Description to LM-3B". LM-3B User's Manual. Issue 1999 (pdf). CASC. 1999. pp. 2–2. Retrieved 2015-07-08.
  13. ^ Norbert Bgügge. "Propulsion CZ-2, CZ-2C, CZ-2D". B14643.DE. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  14. ^ Norbert Bgügge. "Propulsion CZ-3, CZ-3A CZ-3B, CZ-3C". B14643.DE. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  15. ^ Norbert Bgügge. "Propulsion CZ-4A, CZ-4B, CZ-4C". B14643.DE. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  16. ^ Harvey, Brian (2013). "Chapter 3 — The Program". China in Space — The Great Leap Forward. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 87. ISBN 978-1461450436. Retrieved 2015-07-15.
  17. ^ "2.3 LM-3B and LM-3BE Launch Vehicles". LM-3A Series Launch Vehicle User's Manual. Issue 2011 (pdf). CASC. 2011. pp. 2–16. Retrieved 2015-07-08.