Yahu-Bihdi

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Yahu-Bihdi being flayed alive, from an Assyrian engraving.

Yahu-Bihdi was a governor of Hamath appointed by the Assyrian government. He declared himself king of Hamath in 720 BC and led a revolt which was promptly suppressed. Yahu-Bihdi himself was flayed alive. His revolt occurred roughly shortly after the conquest of the Kingdom of Israel by Sargon II and roughly simultaneously with revolts in Babylon as well as in Arpad, Damascus and elsewhere in the Levant.[1]

His name, with the component Yahu, suggests that he may have been an Israelite or a worshipper of Yahweh. Following his defeat, many residents of Hamath were deported to Samaria by the Assyrians, where they became one of the component groups of the Samaritan people. Hamath itself was destroyed after the siege, but had been rebuilt by the 400's BC.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matthews, Victor Harold; Benjamin, Don C. (2006). Old Testament parallels: laws and stories from the ancient Near East. Paulist Press. p. 185-188. ISBN 9780809144358.