Yair Rosenblum

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Yair Rosenblum
Born 1944
Tel Aviv
Died August 27, 1996
(52 years old)
Holon, Israel
Occupation(s) Composer

Yair Rosenblum (Hebrew: יאיר רוזנבלום‎; 1944 – August 27, 1996) was an Israeli composer.[1][2][3][4]

Music career[edit]

Rosenblum was born in Tel Aviv.[5] He was musical director of the Israel Defense Forces chorus in the 1960s and 1970s.[6] He directed Israel's annual music festivals.[5][6]

He conducted and composed songs for the Israel Defense Forces army and navy ensembles. He is best known for such songs, including Shir LaShalom (1970).[7][8] He composed songs for films and television, and worked with a number of bands and choral groups.[5][9][10][11] He wrote more than 1,000 songs, including "Ammunition Hill" (1967), "In a Red Dress," "The Beautiful Life," "Tranquility," "Hallelujah," and "With What Will I Bless Him."[6][12]

He died in Holon in 1996, at the age of 52, after a two-year illness.[6] After his death, his daughter Karen received the lifetime achievement award on his behalf at the ACUM (Association of Composers and Publishers) Awards ceremony.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Motti Regev; Edwin Seroussi (2004). Popular music and national culture in Israel. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 
  2. ^ Phillip Vannini; J. Patrick Williams (2009). Authenticity in culture, self, and society. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 
  3. ^ Marc Rosenstein (2010). Galilee diary. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Yair Rosenblum". RadioHazak. June 11, 1995. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b c Marsha Bryan Edelman (2003). Discovering Jewish music. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b c d Naomi Segal (August 30, 1996). "Composer of `Peace Song' dies". Jweekly. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 
  7. ^ Joel N. Eglash (2002). The Complete Jewish Songbook: The Definitive Collection of Jewish Songs. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 
  8. ^ Union of American Hebrew Congregations, Joel N Eglash, Rosalie Boxt, Robert Weiner (2003). Shireinu. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 
  9. ^ Un'taneh Tokef; Lawrence A. Hoffman (2010). Who by fire, who by water-Un'taneh tokef. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 
  10. ^ Oliver Leaman (2001). Companion encyclopedia of Middle Eastern and North African film. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 
  11. ^ Amy Kronish; Costel Safirman (2003). Israeli film: a reference guide. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 
  12. ^ Gil Zohar (February 23, 2007). "Old soldiers never die". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 
  13. ^ Helen Kaye (January 23, 1997). "Songwriter Moshe Willensky dies at 87". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved July 28, 2011. 

External links[edit]