Yakub (actor)

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Yakub
Yakub (actor).png
Born Yakub Khan Mehboob Khan
1904
Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India
Died 1958 (aged 53–54)
Breach Candy Hospital, Bombay, Maharashtra, India
Occupation Actor
Years active 1924–1958
Spouse(s) Lakshmiben

Yakub Khan Mehboob Khan, known as Yakub,[1] was an Indian Hindi film actor born into a Pathan family in 1904 in Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India.[2] He died in 1958 after a career spanning thirty years in the film industry.[citation needed] He is best known for his comedic villainous roles.[3] He commenced his career as an extra, but soon did roles as a hero and later as a villain. He became one of the most renowned screen villains, while achieving equal success in comedy and character roles.[4] Yakub appeared in over 300 films.

Early life[edit]

Yakub ran away from home at an early age, and did odd jobs such as a motor mechanic and table waiter before joining the ship "S. S. Madura" as a kitchen worker. He left the ship after travelling to various places, like London, Brussels and Paris, then returned to Calcutta where he worked as a tourist guide, among other jobs. He finally came to Bombay now Mumbai, around 1924 and joined the Sharda Film Company.[5][6]

Career[edit]

During his travels, Yakub watched the films of Hollywood actors, and became greatly influenced by Eddie Polo, Douglas Fairbanks Sr., Wallace Beery and later by Humphrey Bogart.[7] Yakub's first film was Bhalji Pendharkar's silent Bajirao Mastani (1925), which also starred Master Vithal. It was produced by the Sharda Film Company. His first talkie was Meri Jaan (1931), with Sagar Movietone and directed by Prafulla Ghosh, where he played the title role of the Prince. This film has also been credited as Romantic Prince. The film had Master Vithal, Mehboob Khan and Zubeida co-starring in it.[8] His enactment of the role of an angry resentful son in Mehboob Khan's Aurat (1940) made him popular to the extent that his acting in this film is considered as one of the finest performances in the Indian Cinema.[9][10] The role was later performed by Sunil Dutt in Mehboob Khan's famous remake of his own film with the new title Mother India (1957). Yakub's popularity in those days can be gauged by the credit roll of films such as the S K Ojha directed Hulchul (1951), which had a star cast of Dilip Kumar, Nargis and Sitara Devi, where his name was credited as '…and your favourite, Yakub'.

Yakub was an "acknowledged master of comedy" along with other actors such as Johnny Walker, Gope and Agha, but their vast talent was unused, which was a "gross injustice", according to the B. K. Karanjia co-edited book; Genres of Indian Cinema.[11] His comic pairing with Gope and Agha was well liked by the audiences, and this caused the film-makers to use their combination in several films. Prominent of such films were Sagai (1951), Patanga (1949) and Beqasoor (1950) with Yakub and Gope.[12] Yakub, Prithviraj Kapoor and Chandra Mohan were in the highest pay bracket of their times.[13] The triumvirate of Dilip Kumar, Dev Anand and Raj Kapoor, who held reign in the Indian film industry from the late 1940s to the end of 1970s, has been compared to Chandra Mohan, Yakub and Shyam, who were at the top of the acting roster from 1930 to early 1950.[14]

Director[edit]

Yakub directed three films; Sagar Ka Sher and Uski Tamanna in the 1930s, and Aiye in 1949. Sagar Ka Sher or Lion of Sagar, was the first film he directed as early as 1937 under the Sagar Movietone banner. His co-stars in this film were; Bibbo, Pesi Patel, Sankatha Prasad, Raja Mehdi and David. The music director was Pransukh M. Nayak. Uski Tamanna also known as Her Last Desire was made in 1939 under Sagar and directed by Yakub. The film starred Yakub, Maya, Bhudo Advani, Kaushalya, Sankatha Prasad, Satish and Putli. The music was composed by Anupam Ghatak.[15] He directed his third and last movie, Aiye, in 1949 under the Indian Production banner. It had Sulochana Chatterjee, Masud, Jankidas, Sheela Naik, and Ashraf Khan along with Yakub. The music in this film was composed by Nashad (Shaukat Dehlvi) and was Mubarak Begum's first film as a playback singer. Yakub's second cousin Allaudin was the song recordist for this film. However, he lost money on this film and called it the biggest mistake of his life.[16]

  • When Mehmood was a struggling artist, he would hang around Bombay Talkies waiting for Yakub to arrive. Yakub knowing his financial state would give him one or two rupees in the form of loose change.[17]
  • Yakub was a deeply religious person and was called Maulana by his friends.[18]

Death[edit]

Yakub died in Bombay, Maharashtra, India, at the age of 54 years.

Filmography[edit]

Yakub acted in over 300 films in a career covering 34 years. A brief filmography is listed.[19]

Year Film Director
1925 Bajirao Mastani Bhal G. Pendharkar
1927 Gulzar Nanubhai Desai
1928 Chandravali Begum Fatima
1930 Nai Roshni Bhagwati Mishra
1931 Meri Jaan (Romantic Prince) Prafulla Ghosh
1932 Bulbul-E-Baghdad Nanubhai Vakil
1933 Miss 1933 Chandulal Shah
1935 Al Hilal (Judgement of Allah) Mehboob Khan
1936 Do Diwane Chimanlal Luhar
1936 Grama Kanya (Village Girl) Sarvottam Badami
1936 Manmohan Mehboob Khan
1937 Sagar Ka Sher (Lion of Sagar) Yakub
1937 Milap A. R. Kardar
1938 Teen Sau Din Ke Baad (300 Days and After) Sarvottam Badami
1938 Watan Mehboob Khan
1939 Uski Tamanna (Her Last Desire) Yakub
1940 Aurat Mehboob Khan
1943 Aabroo Nazir
1943 Najma Mehboob Khan
1944 Lal Haveli K. B. Lall
1945 Zeenat Shaukat Hussain Rizvi
1946 Nek Parvin S. M. Yusuf
1947 Samaj Ko Badal Dalo Vijay Bhatt
1949 Aiye Yakub
1949 Patanga H. S. Rawail
1950 Beqasoor K. Amarnath
1951 Hulchul Shubh Karan Ojha
1954 Waris Nitin Bose
1957 Ab Dilli Dur Nahin Amar Kumar
1957 Paying Guest Subodh Mukherjee
1958 Adalat Kalidas
1958 Ten O'Clock Jugal Kishore

1951 Deedar Nitin Bose

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stars of The Indian Screen-by Sushila Rani Baburao Patel Parker and Sons 1952
  2. ^ Encyclopedia of Hindi Cinema, edited by Gulazara, Govind Nihalani, Saibal Chatterjee. Yakub pg.638 Popular Prakashan 2003
  3. ^ Eena Meena Deeka: The Story of Hindi Film Comedy by Sanjit Narwekar 2005 Rupa ISBN 81-291-0859-3
  4. ^ Encyclopedia of Hindi Cinema, edited by Gulzar, Govind Nihalani, Saibal Chatterjee. Yakub pg.638
  5. ^ Stars of The Indian Screen-by Sushila Rani Baburao Patel Parker and Sons 1952
  6. ^ Encyclopedia of Hindi Cinema, edited by Gulzar, Govind Nihalani, Saibal CEncyclopedia of Hindi Cinema, edited by Gulzar, Govind Nihalani, Saibal Chatterjee pg. 638
  7. ^ Encyclopedia of Hindi Cinema, edited by Gulzar, Govind Nihalani, Saibal Chatterjee pg. 638
  8. ^ CITWF-Film database home-film information Meri Jaan (1931)
  9. ^ Encyclopaedia of Hindi Cinema edited by Gulazar, Govind Nihalani, Saibal Chatterjee. Yakub, pg 638
  10. ^ cineplot.Yakub-interview
  11. ^ Genres of Indian Cinema edited by B. K. Karanjia, pg 82. Digitized 26 April 2008. Original from The University of California
  12. ^ Eena Meena Deeka: The Story of Hindi Film Comedy by Sanjit Narwekar 2005 ISBN 81-291-0859-3
  13. ^ Other Side of the Coin: An Intimate Study of Indian Film Industry by Madan Gaur pg. 29 Trimurti Prakashan retrieved 14 April 2014
  14. ^ Other Side of the Coin: An Intimate Study of Indian Film Industry by Madan Gaur pg. 75 Trimurti Prakashan ISBN 81799 10660
  15. ^ CITWF Database-Yakub
  16. ^ Yakub Interview (conducted in 1954) from Cineplot. Retrieved 8 April 2014
  17. ^ Mehmood, A Man of Many Moods by Hanif Zaveri pg. 43 Retrieved 8 April 2014 Popular Prakashan 2005 ISBN 8179912132
  18. ^ Yakub Interview (conducted in 1954) from Cineplot
  19. ^ CITWF Database-Yakub http://www.citwf.com/person444181.htm

External links[edit]