Yan Huiqing

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Yan Huiqing
Yan Huiqing.jpg
Premier of the Republic of China
In office
13 May 1926 – 22 June 1926
Preceded by Hu Weide
Succeeded by Du Xigui
In office
14 September 1924 – 31 October 1924
Preceded by Wellington Koo
Succeeded by Huang Fu
In office
11 June 1922 – 5 August 1922
Preceded by Zhou Ziqi
Succeeded by Wang Chonghui
In office
25 January 1922 – 8 April 1922
Preceded by Liang Shiyi
Succeeded by Zhou Ziqi
In office
18 December 1921 – 24 December 1921
Preceded by Jin Yunpeng
Succeeded by Liang Shiyi
President of the Republic of China
Acting
In office
13 May 1926 – 22 June 1926
Preceded by Hu Weide (Acting)
Succeeded by Du Xigui (Acting)
Personal details
Born (1877-04-02)2 April 1877
Died 24 May 1950(1950-05-24) (aged 73)
Shanghai
Political party Anhui clique
Education University of Virginia (B.A.)
Peiyang University (D.Litt.)

Yan Huiqing (Wade–Giles: Yen Hui-Ch'ing, (also Weiching Williams Yen or simply W.W. Yen) 顏惠慶 (2 April 1877 – 24 May 1950) was Premier of China and President of the Republic of China in the 1920s. He was also an accomplished linguist.

Biography[edit]

A native of Shanghai and a graduate of the University of Virginia (where he received prizes and medals for debate, and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa), he taught English at St. John's University, Shanghai for a short time after coming back from the United States, where he became a Freemason, and then went to Beijing to start his political career.[1] In 1906, he became an editor at the Commercial Press, received a D.Litt. from the Peiyang University (now Tianjin University), and was appointed to the Imperial Ministry of Education.

He served as Foreign Minister,[2] premier (and acting premier) five times and as acting president during his last premiership in 1926. Wu Peifu handpicked him for the acting presidency to pave the way for Cao Kun's restoration, and he set up a cabinet in anticipation,[3] but he was unable to take office due to Zhang Zuolin's objection. When Yan finally took his post, he immediately resigned and appointed navy minister Du Xigui as his successor.

A veteran diplomat, he was China's first ambassador to the Soviet Union,[4] and a delegate to the Washington Naval Conference[5] and the League of Nations; he also served as a diplomat to Germany, Sweden, Denmark, and, finally, the United States,[6] where he denounced the Japanese invasion of Manchuria.[7] During World War II, he translated and compiled Stories of Old China in Hong Kong while under Japanese house-arrest in 1942. He took his first plane trip in 1949 to Moscow in hopes of resolving the Chinese Civil War.

He died in May 1950, survived by his widow and six children.[8]

References[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Jin Yunpeng
Premier of China
1921
Succeeded by
Liang Shiyi
Preceded by
Liang Shiyi
Premier of China
1922
Succeeded by
Zhou Ziqi
Preceded by
Zhou Ziqi
Premier of China
1922
Succeeded by
Wang Chonghui
Preceded by
Gu Weijun
Premier of China
1924
Succeeded by
Huang Fu
Preceded by
Hu Weide
President of the Republic of China
1926
Succeeded by
Du Xigui