Ictalurus pricei

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Ictalurus pricei
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Siluriformes
Family: Ictaluridae
Genus: Ictalurus
Species: I. pricei
Binomial name
Ictalurus pricei
(Rutter, 1896)
Synonyms
  • Villarius pricei Rutter, 1896

Ictalurus pricei, the Yaqui catfish, is a species of North American freshwater catfish endemic to Mexico.

Description[edit]

The coloration of the Yaqui catfish is dark gray to black dorsally, and white to grayish beneath. The barbells of the catfish are jet-black except on the chin, where they are gray to whitened. The Yaqui catfish body is usually profusely speckled".[2] A reddish coloration on the catfish is prominent beneath the head, as well as on the fins and tail. The adult size is up to 57.0 cm.[3]

Etymology[edit]

I. pricei was named in honour of William W. Price.[4]

Range[edit]

The Yaqui catfish historically occurred in San Bernardino Creek as far up as San Bernardino Ranch, Arizona. An introduced population of catfish existed in the Monkey Springs Reservoir system near Patagonia, Arizona from 1899 until the 1950s. The stock presumably came from the Rio Sonora basin of Sonora, Mexico, where the species still lives.[5] A small population of 350 fish has been re-introduced into the Rio Yaqui on the Northern most portion of the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge in November 1997.[6]

Habitat[edit]

The Yaqui catfish are found primarily in ponds or streams, primarily in larger rivers but also in small streams where it prefers quiet, clear pools. The catfish are most common in larger rivers in areas of medium to slow currents over sand/rock bottom.[7] Streams flow intermittently in the dry season, and the catfish seeks refuge in permanent, often spring fed pools.[8]

Population Trends[edit]

The Yaqui catfish survived in San Bernardino Creek until spring flows diminished because of groundwater pumping causing the creek dried up. The remaining habitat at San Bernardino Creek was severely trampled by livestock, making it uninhabitable.[9] The catfish were introduced in 1899 into the Santa Cruz River System (in reservoir fed by Monkey Spring) where they persisted until the 1950s. A small population of 350 fish has been re-introduced into the Rio Yaqui on the Northern most portion of the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge in November 1997, however outside the San Bernardino refuge the Yaqui catfish have become extinct from United States waters.[10]

Management Factors[edit]

Activities that are known to be detrimental to the Yaqui catfish populations are the de-watering of habitats through stream usage and re-routing, stream impoundment, channelization, domestic livestock grazing, timber harvesting, mining, road construction, polluting, and stocking non-natives.

Threats: aquifer pumping; reduction in stream flows; water diversion; drought; hybridization, competition and predation by nonnative fishes.

Management Needs: protect San Bernardino aquifers, and Leslie Creek and Black Draw watersheds to ensure adequate perennial flow; ameliorate effects of nonnative fishes; reintroduce into suitable habitats within historical range; stabilize and protect populations in Mexico.

References[edit]

  1. ^ NatureServe 2013. Ictalurus pricei. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.1. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 13 July 2013.
  2. ^ Minckley, W.L. 1973. Fishes of Arizona. Arizona Game and Fish Department, Phoenix. pp. 179-180.
  3. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-05-28. Retrieved 2009-11-04. 
  4. ^ Fisher, Walter K. (March 1923). "William Wightman Price" (PDF). The Condor. 25: 50–57. 
  5. ^ Miller, R.R. 1977. Composition of the native fish fauna of the Chihuahuan Desert Region. In Water and Riskind, eds, Transactions of the symposium on the biological resources of the Chihuahuan Desert Region. Transactions of proceedings series No.3. U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington D.C..
  6. ^ Miller, R.R. 1977. Composition of the native fish fauna of the Chihuahuan Desert Region. In Water and Riskind, eds, Transactions of the symposium on the biological resources of the Chihuahuan Desert Region. Transactions of proceedings series No.3. U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington D.C..
  7. ^ Hendrickson et al. 1979. Rept. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
  8. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-05-28. Retrieved 2009-11-04. 
  9. ^ Hendrickson, D.A., W.L. Minckley, R.R. Miller, et al. 1980. Fishes of the Rio Yaqui Basin, Mexico and United States. Journal of the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science 15(3):78,79.
  10. ^ Minckley, W.L. 1973. Fishes of Arizona. Arizona Game and Fish Department, Phoenix. pp. 179-180.