Yas'ur

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Yas'ur

יַסְעוּר
Yas'ur.jpg
Yas'ur is located in Northwest Israel
Yas'ur
Yas'ur
Coordinates: 32°54′1.8″N 35°9′58.32″E / 32.900500°N 35.1662000°E / 32.900500; 35.1662000Coordinates: 32°54′1.8″N 35°9′58.32″E / 32.900500°N 35.1662000°E / 32.900500; 35.1662000
DistrictNorthern
CouncilMateh Asher
AffiliationKibbutz Movement
Founded1949
Founded byHungarian Jewish immigrants
Population
 (2018)[1]
856
Name meaningPetrel
Websitewww.yassur.org.il
Establishment of Kibbutz Yas'ur, 1949; speaker - Levi Eshkol

Yas'ur (Hebrew: יַסְעוּר, lit. petrel) is a kibbutz in northern Israel. Located east of Acre in the Western Galilee, it falls under the jurisdiction of Mateh Asher Regional Council. In 2018 it had a population of 856.[1]

History[edit]

The kibbutz was established in 1949 by Jewish immigrants from Hungary who were members of the Zionist Socialist youth movement Hashomer Hatzair; they were joined in 1951 by another group of immigrants from England and in 1956 by another group from Brazil.[2] The parents of Israeli historian Benny Morris were among the founders of the kibbutz, shortly after his birth.[3]

The kibbutz was established on the land of the depopulated Palestinian village of Al-Birwa,[4] and it uses the land of the depopulated village of Al-Damun for agriculture.[5]

Yasur's economy was based on textile and toy factories, which became unprofitable and closed down. In 2003 the kibbutz began a process of renewal and launched a successful membership drive.[6] An Italian restaurant, Liliana's, is located on the grounds of the kibbutz.[7]

Notable residents[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Population in the Localities 2018" (XLS). Israel Central Bureau of Statistics. 25 August 2019. Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  2. ^ About Kibbutz Yasur
  3. ^ Benny Morris on Why He's Written His Last Word on the Israel-Arab Conflict Haaretz, 20 September 2012
  4. ^ Khalidi, Walid (1992). All That Remains: The Palestinian Villages Occupied and Depopulated by Israel in 1948. Washington D.C.: Institute for Palestine Studies. p. 10. ISBN 0-88728-224-5.
  5. ^ Khalidi, Walid (1992). All That Remains: The Palestinian Villages Occupied and Depopulated by Israel in 1948. Washington D.C.: Institute for Palestine Studies. p. 11. ISBN 0-88728-224-5.
  6. ^ Kershner, Isabel (August 27, 2007). "The Kibbutz Sheds Socialism and Gains Popularity". New York Times. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  7. ^ Wagner, Robert (December 6, 2012). "Italy in the Galilee". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  8. ^ Remnick, David (April 28, 2008). "Blood and Sand". The New Yorker. Retrieved September 12, 2019.

External links[edit]