Ye Jiangchuan

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Ye Jiangchuan
Ye Jiangchuan.jpg
Full name Ye Jiangchuan
Country China
Born (1960-11-20) November 20, 1960 (age 56)
Wuxi, Jiangsu, China
Title Grandmaster (1993)
FIDE rating 2602 (June 2017)
Peak rating 2684 (April 2003)
Ye Jiangchuan
Traditional Chinese 葉江川
Simplified Chinese 叶江川

Ye Jiangchuan (simplified Chinese: 叶江川; traditional Chinese: 葉江川; pinyin: Yè Jiāngchuān; born November 20, 1960 in Wuxi, Jiangsu)[1] is a veteran Chinese chess player and has been one of China's leading players in modern history.

In 1993, Ye became China's third Grandmaster, after Ye Rongguang and Xie Jun. On 1 January 2000, he became the first ever Chinese player to cross the 2600 elo rating mark. He was awarded the title of 'FIDE Senior Trainer' in 2005.

Career[edit]

Ye learned chess when he was already 17 years old of age, and at 20 he became National Champion of China. He has altogether won the Chinese Chess Championship seven times (1981, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1994, 1996).

Ye has represented his country at numerous Chess Olympiads and regional team championships in Asia. He has been four times member of the Asia Team Champions, a 10 times Olympiad participant. His best team result in an Olympiad was in 1998 in Elista where he was on the first board as the national team finished in fifth place.

Ye was 1995 and 1999 Champion of Dato Tan Chin Nam Cup, and 2001 Co-Champion of same cup. He reached the 4th round (9–16th place) in the 2001 Fide World Championship, where he was eliminated by Vassily Ivanchuk (½–1½). He also reached the quarter-finals in the 2000 and 2002 Fide World Cup.

Ye has played less frequently after becoming the chief coach of the Chinese National Teams (men and women) in 2000.[2] Ye's highest world ranking was 17th in October 2000 and he had been consistently in the top 25 from 2000–04.[3]

China Chess League[edit]

Ye Jiangchuan plays for Beijing chess club in the China Chess League (CCL).[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Liu Wenzhe
Men's Chinese Chess Champion
1981
Succeeded by
Liu Wenzhe
Preceded by
Xu Jun
Men's Chinese Chess Champion
1984
Succeeded by
Xu Jun
Preceded by
Xu Jun
Men's Chinese Chess Champion
1986, 1987
Succeeded by
Wang Zili
Preceded by
Wang Zili
Men's Chinese Chess Champion
1989
Succeeded by
Ye Rongguang
Preceded by
Tong Yuanming
Men's Chinese Chess Champion
1994
Succeeded by
Liang Jinrong
Preceded by
Liang Jinrong
Men's Chinese Chess Champion
1996
Succeeded by
Lin Weiguo