Yebin Mok

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Yebin Mok
Personal information
Country representedUnited States
Born (1984-04-19) April 19, 1984 (age 34)
Seoul, South Korea
Height1.60 m (5 ft 3 in)
Former coachFrank Carroll, Peter Oppegard, Johnny Bevan, Ming Zhu Li
Former choreographerIrina Yelchin
Skating clubAll Year FSC
Former training locationsEl Segundo, California
Burbank, California
Began skating1994

Yebin Mok (born April 19, 1984) is an American figure skater. She is the 2002 Golden Spin of Zagreb silver medalist, won two bronze medals on the ISU Junior Grand Prix circuit, and placed fifth at the 2003 World Junior Championships.

Personal life[edit]

Mok was born on April 19, 1984 in Seoul, South Korea.[1] She emigrated to the United States with her parents when she was seven.[2]

Career[edit]

Mok began skating in 1994 in Culver City, California.[3] She won Junior Olympics in 1997 in Juvenile,[4] and 1998 in Intermediate Ladies,[5] which is equivalent to U.S Junior Nationals. A stress fracture in the summer of 1998 kept her off the ice for three months.[3]

In October 2000, Mok made her Junior Grand Prix (JGP) debut, placing fourth in Germany before winning bronze in the Czech Republic. In November, she won a senior international medal – silver at the Golden Spin of Zagreb. Around 2000, she developed a pinched nerve in her back.[3] She was selected to compete at the 2001 World Junior Championships in Sofia, Bulgaria. She placed tenth in her qualifying group but withdrew before the short program.

In the 2002–03 JGP series, Mok placed fourth in Montreal and won bronze in Beijing. She placed sixth on the senior level at the 2003 U.S. Championships and was sent to the 2003 World Junior Championships in Ostrava. She placed second in her qualifying group, fifth in the short program, sixth in the free skate, and fifth overall in the Czech Republic. Mok later missed five months of training due to a stress fracture in her lower back and then four months due to ganglion cysts on her ankles, which required surgery.[3]

Mok did not compete in the 2005–06 season. She struggled with eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and depression.[6][3] In 2008, she became a professional skater for Holiday on Ice.[7]

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating
2003–2004
[1]
2002–2003
[8]
  • Spartacus
2000–2001
[9]
  • Concerto No. 1
    by Camille Saint-Saëns

Competitive highlights[edit]

International[1]
Event 96–97 97–98 98–99 99–00 00–01 01–02 02–03 03–04 04–05 06–07 07–08
Golden Spin 2nd
International: Junior[1][9]
Junior Worlds WD 5th
JGP Canada 4th
JGP China 3rd
JGP Czech Rep. 3rd
JGP Germany 4th
National[1][10]
U.S. Champ. 5th J. 10th 10th 6th WD 16th
Junior Olympics 1st Jv. 1st I.
Pacific Coast 4th J. 2nd 3rd 6th
Southwest Pacific 2nd J. 2nd 8th 4th
Levels: Jv. = Juvenile, I. = Intermediate, J. = Junior
JGP: ISU Junior Grand Prix; QR: Qualifying round; WD: Withdrew

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Ye Bin MOK: 2003/2004". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 1, 2007.
  2. ^ Mittan, Barry (October 19, 2004). "Twirling's Loss is Skating's Gain". Golden Skate.
  3. ^ a b c d e Hawkins, Chelsea (August 10, 2012). "Yebin Mok Returns to the Ice After Struggling with Eating Disorder". iamkoream.com. Archived from the original on October 1, 2015.
  4. ^ Aubert, Antoinette M. (1997). "Pennsylvania Skaters Earn Medals at Junior Olympics". Hearthstone Press. catslair.com. Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  5. ^ "The Figure Skating Corner: 1998 Junior Olympics". figure-skating-corner.com. Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  6. ^ "Yebin Mok". iamkoreanamerican.com. June 12, 2012. Archived from the original on March 23, 2013.
  7. ^ Elfman, Lois (June 7, 2012). "Mok discovers bliss in professional skating". IceNetwork.com.
  8. ^ "Ye Bin MOK: 2002/2003". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on April 2, 2003.
  9. ^ a b "Ye Bin MOK: 2000/2001". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 24, 2001.
  10. ^ "Yebin Mok". U.S. Figure Skating. Archived from the original on April 13, 2005.

External links[edit]