Gymnothorax nudivomer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Yellowmouth moray)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Gymnothorax nudivomer
Yellowmouth Moray Eel.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Anguilliformes
Family: Muraenidae
Genus: Gymnothorax
Species:
G. nudivomer
Binomial name
Gymnothorax nudivomer
(Günther, 1867)

The starry moray or yellowmouth moray (Gymnothorax nudivomer) is a species of marine fish in the family Muraenidae.

Description[edit]

The starry moray is a large sized fish that can reach a maximum length of 180 cm, but the ones usually observed are rather smaller.[1] Its serpentine in shape body has a brown background color dotted with small white spots circled with darker brown than its background color. The size of these spots is relatively small at the head and is getting larger toward the tail. One of the characteristic point to identify this moray is the yellow color of its inside mouth. The gills aperture is brown dark.

Distribution and habitat[edit]

The starry moray is widespread throughout the Indo-Pacific area from eastern coast of Africa, Red Sea included, until Polynesia and Hawaii and from south Japan to New Caledonia.[2]

Gymnothorax nudivomer

It lives on the outer slopes of coral reefs, sitting sheltered in crevices between 3.3 and 894.3 feet (1 and 271 meters) deep, but is usually seen at depths of around 99 feet (30 meters).[3][4]

Biology[edit]

The starry moray is solitary and carnivorous, it leaves its lair at night to actively hunt its preys along the reef. It mainly feeds on fishes.

A starry moray at Aliwal Shoal

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lieske, E. and R. Myers, 1994. Collins Pocket Guide. Coral reef fishes. Indo-Pacific & Caribbean including the Red Sea. Harper Collins Publishers, 400 p.
  2. ^ Castle, P.H.J. and J.E. McCosker, 1986. Muraenidae. p. 165-176. In M.M. Smith and P.C. Heemstra (eds.) Smiths' sea fishes. Springer-Verlag, Berlin.
  3. ^ Mundy, B.C., 2005. Checklist of the fishes of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Bishop Museum Bulletins in Zoology. Bishop Mus. Bull. Zool. (6):1-704.
  4. ^ Kuiter, R.H., 1998. Photo guide to fishes of the Maldives. Atoll Editions, Victoria, Australia. 257 p.

External links[edit]