Yen Chia-kan

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C. K. Yen
Yen Chia-kan
嚴家淦
Yen Chia-kan 1965.jpg
President of the Republic of China
In office
5 April 1975 – 20 May 1978
Preceded by Chiang Kai-shek
Succeeded by Chiang Ching-kuo
Vice President of the Republic of China
In office
20 May 1966 – 5 April 1975
President Chiang Kai-shek
Preceded by Chen Cheng
Succeeded by Hsieh Tung-min
Personal details
Born (1905-10-23)October 23, 1905
Suzhou, Jiangsu, Qing Dynasty
Died December 24, 1993(1993-12-24) (aged 88)
Taipei, Taiwan
Resting place Wuchih Mountain Military Cemetery
New Taipei City, Taiwan
Nationality Republic of China
Political party Kuomintang
Spouse(s) Liu Chi-chun
This is a Chinese name; the family name is Yen.
Not to be confused with Yahya Khan.
Yen Chia-kan
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese

Yen Chia-kan (Chinese: 嚴家淦; pinyin: Yán Jiāgàn; October 23, 1905 – December 24, 1993), also known as C. K. Yen, was a Taiwanese politician. He succeeded Chiang Kai-shek as President of the Republic of China upon Chiang's death on April 5, 1975. He served out the remainder of Chiang's term until May 20, 1978. He was a member of the Kuomintang.

Early life[edit]

C. K. Yen was born in Wu County, Suzhou, Jiangsu province in 1905. He came of a prestigious Suzhou family, the Yan (Yen) Family of Dongshan (東山嚴氏).[1] He graduated from Saint John's University in Shanghai with a degree in chemistry in 1926.

Political career[edit]

Yen started to work as director of the finance department of Fujian Provincial Government in August 1939. During his term, he initiated a policy of land tax payment for farmers with their agricultural produce. This policy was then adopted nationwide across China and contributed significantly for the nation food supply during World War II.[2]

Yen previously served as Minister of Economic Affairs, minister of finance, and Governor of Taiwan Province. He became premier on December 16, 1963.[3][4]

In 1966 the National Assembly elected Yen as Vice President and re-elected him in 1972. He became the second President following the death of Chiang Kai-shek and was later succeeded by Chiang's son, Premier Chiang Ching-kuo. After his presidency, Yen served as Chairman of the Council on Chinese Cultural Renaissance and Chairman of Board of the National Palace Museum until 1991.

Death[edit]

Yen died in Taipei City at the age of 88. He was buried at the Wuchih Mountain Military Cemetery in New Taipei City.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ By Sun Zhongwang, "Yan Family, Dongting Dongshan Anrenli (孙中旺,《洞庭東山安仁里严氏》) The Office of Suzhou History (苏州地方志). Yan Jiachi, an important politician in the Reformed Government of the Republic of China and the Wang Jingwei regime (Republic of China-Nanjing) also came of this family.
  2. ^ http://english.president.gov.tw/Default.aspx?tabid=550
  3. ^ "Yen Chia-kan", in Heads of States and Governments Since 1945, by Harris M. Lentz, (Routledge, 2014) p173
  4. ^ "Yen Assumes Premiership", Bridgeport (CT) Post, December 16, 1963, p10
Political offices
Preceded by
Liu Hang-chen
Economic Affairs Minister of the Republic of China
1950
Succeeded by
Cheng Tao-ju
Preceded by
Kuan Chi-yu
Finance Minister of the Republic of China
1950–1954
Succeeded by
P. Y. Shu
Preceded by
position established
Minister of Vocational Assistance Commission for Retired Servicemen of the Republic of China
1954–1956
Succeeded by
Chiang Ching-kuo
Preceded by
Yu Horng-jiun
Governor of Taiwan Province
1954–1957
Succeeded by
Chow Chih-jou
Preceded by
P. Y. Shu
Finance Minister of the Republic of China
1958–1963
Succeeded by
Chen Ching-yu
Preceded by
Chen Cheng
Premier of the Republic of China
1963–1972
Succeeded by
Chiang Ching-kuo
Preceded by
Chen Cheng
Vice President of the Republic of China
1966–1975
Succeeded by
Hsieh Tung-ming
Preceded by
Chiang Kai-shek
President of the Republic of China
April 5, 1975–May 20, 1978
Succeeded by
Chiang Ching-kuo